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Older / Elderly GLBT / LGBT People

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Index: - Older GLBT People - Bisexuality - Religion   &  Spirituality - GLBT  History - HIV-AIDS - Male  Youth Prostitution - Homosexuality:  Biological  or  Learned ? Public School Issues - Transgender / Tranvestite / Transsexual - Lesbian  &  Bisexual Women - Homo-Negativity / Phobia - Identity Formation  &  Coming Out - Counseling  &  Therapy - Professional Education  - Gay & Bisexual Male Suicide Problems - Drug / Alcohol Use / Abuse / Addiction  -  - Community Attributes  &  ProblemsCouples / Families / Children / Adoption / Spousal Violence - Race/Ethnic Minority Issues: U.S., Canada, Europe,  New Zealand & AustraliaLatin America / Africa - Middle East / Asia

OLDER / ELDERLY GLBT PEOPLE

"We are always the same age inside"
Gertrude Stein (1874-1946)

Page Index: General (Mostly American, GLBT). - Lesbian / Bisexual Women. -  GLBT People Of Color. - Transgender / Transsexual. - Ageism & Prejudice. - Abuse & Violence. - Health Issues. - HIV / AIDS. - Homes / Housing & Care. - United Kingdom. - Australia. - Canada. - Europe. - French Speaking. - Stereotypes /  Intergenerational Sex / Relationships (Mostly Male Issues). - Internet Resources. - Online Bibliographies & Abstracts. - Book Listing (Abstracts / Reviews). - Full Text Papers / Reports / Documents Online.
 
To "The SEARCH Section" For...
The Best Search Engines & Information Directories, The Searchable Sites to Locate Papers & Abstracts...
And The Sites - Some Searchable - Where "Free Papers" Are Available!

 LGBT Aging and Rhetorical Silence (2009)
"The exclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) elders from queer and gerontological theories
has resulted in the silencing of LGBT older adults and their experiences..."

Aging and Sexual Orientation: A 25-Year Review of the Literature (2010)
"In a review of 58 articles published between 1984 and 2008, this article synthesizes the recent state of social research on older lesbian, gay male, and bisexual adults in order to summarize existing knowledge about these groups, to guide future research on aging, and to identify the substantive issues affecting their lives." Note: Many more papers will be required to produce a good understanding of GLBTQ - Sexual Minority - people.


Diesel-powered Ageism (2009)
In our own community, where are the positive images of aging and older people? When was the last time you went on an LGBT website or picked up an LGBT magazine and saw plentiful images of the older people who were the pioneers of our community? Given that the demographics of the country say that we're getting older by the day, that we're awash in an exciting "silver tsunami," where are they?
Why am I complaining? Just look down at the feet of the Diesel model.

C3 : S3
Challenges Closets Companions
Seniors Sex Sensuality

(2011)
We had an AIDS crisis where we helped our own.
We now have an aging crisis where we’re
not helping our own.
Why?‛
This has to change!

SAGE USA (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, 2013).
Health Equity and LGBT Elders of Color:
Recommendations for Policy and Practice. PDF Download.
LGBT elders of color are an important part of this demographic shift - yet the available research shows that they often face heightened health disparities and are largely rendered invisible in public policy discussions on aging.Many LGBT elders of color enter retirement age without the supports necessary for healthy aging. And a lifetime of discrimination has adversely affected LGBT elders of color, based on multiple aspects of their identities, including racial inequality, anti-LGBT discrimination, challenges based on immigration status, and more.

The Science of Conducting Research With LGBT Older Adults- An Introduction to
Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS) (2016)

The Aging and Health Report (2016, PDF)

Suit Charges Elderly Gay Partners Were Forced Apart (2010).

General (Mostly American, GLBT)

First White House Conference On Gay Aging Held In Miami (2012). - Community forum to explore aging in city’s gay community (2012). - Study of the Day: Gay Seniors Are Resilient Despite Tougher Old Age (2012): The first national LGBT aging project highlights the need for more appropriate services and better health care for this neglected community. - Aging gay: Lesbian and gay seniors flourish in changing times (2012). - Retirement Options Limited For Gay And Lesbian Seniors (2012). - Gay and Gray: What We Need to Know About Aging Gay Men (2012). - Gay Men and Aging: Finding Your Purpose (2012). - Creating A Safe Place For Older Adults Who Are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (2012). - Are We Allowed to Age? Growing Older as a Gay Man (2012). - Aging getting less scary for gay boomers (2012): Laws covering retirement benefits, hospital visitation keeping same-sex couples in mind. - Aging With Grace in the Gay Community (2013): I was born in 1963. It is now the year 2013. If you aren't too quick with math, I'll tell you what that means: This year I will be 50 years old. That's close to 100 in gay years, or so it may seem in the gay male community, where there is a fixation on youth, vigor, full heads of hair and six-pack abs. - LGBT retirement issues (Wikipedia).

Aging lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people face increased risk of mental illness (2011). -  Gay, Lesbian Older Adults Face Adversity, Depression (2011). - Local filmmaker showcases stories of aging black lesbians (2011). - Understanding the Psychological Challenges Aging Gay Men Face (2012). - Aging issues can be tougher on gays (2010, Alternate Link). - Aging in the LGBT community: Growing older in a hostile environment (2010). - Gay Couples Need To Plan Differently For Aging (2010). - Gray, Gay…and Worried (2010). - Forum on ageing and discrimination in the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex communities - working paper (2009). - ‘Invisible And Overlooked’ (2008, Newsweek): A growing population of lesbian and gay senior citizens seeks recognition for their unique needs and challenges. - Facts About the Aging Lesbian and Gay Community (2008, Newsweek): A growing population of lesbian and gay senior citizens seeks recognition for their unique needs and challenges. - Why Do Gay Men Fear Aging? (2012). - Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender senior citizens come out late, start second lifetime (2010): Increased awareness and acceptance of varied sexualities and gender identities has led Americans to come out far younger, as early as middle school. A less noticed but parallel shift is happening at the other end of the age spectrum, with people in their 60s, 70s and 80s coming to terms with the truth that they are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.

Affirmative Aging: Awareness and advocacy are growing for elderly LGBT adults (2010): Portland’s Second Annual Gay and Grey conference is part of a budding movement in the Portland metropolitan area to create services and resources for an ever-growing population of elderly lesbian, gay, bi and trans adults. Gay and Grey, taking place this year on May 22, was founded in 2009 by advocates for elderly LGBT adults. !e one-day conference provides free health consultations, fitness evaluations and panels discussing topics on gay-friendly senior housing options and other issues. Last year’s event attracted approximately 150 people. Organizers are optimistic the number will double this year. !ey also hope the resource fair will make it less daunting for elderly LGBT adults to access services that ultimately make aging a little easier. - Friendly House Announces New Affiliation as SAGE Metro Portland (2013): For over a decade Friendly House has provided a range of services for LGBT older adults with a mission to enhance the lives of LGBT community members through education, advocacy, outreach, resource development and case management. Previously known as Gay & Grey, we are now officially joining the SAGE network as the Portland local affiliate and will be known as SAGE Metro Portland..  Formerly known as Gay & Grey our SAGE Metro Portland program works to enhance the lives of older gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community members through education, advocacy, outreach and resource development. In 2010, Friendly House’s SAGE Metro Portland program adopted SHARE (Senior Housing and Retirement Enterprises), a private non-profit that had been established in 2001 to address the critical lack of affordable housing for sexual-minority seniors in the Greater Portland Metro area. In 2011 Gay & Grey become an affiliate of a national non-profit, SAGE (Services and Advocacy for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Elders).

Suicide Of Self-Help Therapist Raises The Gloomy Specter Of Gay Men And Aging (2012): On Saturday, The New York Times ran a belated obituary of sorts for well-known Manhattan therapist Bob Bergeron, who committed suicide in January at age 49. Though every death is tragic, what made his so alarming was that Bergeron was about to see his self-help book, The Right Side of Forty: The Complete Guide to Happiness for Gay Men at Midlife and Beyond, hit bookstores. And yet, Bergeron was despondent about growing older.
- Author of Self-Help Book for Gay Men Stuns Friends With Suicide (2012). - Gay Men and Aging: Finding Your Purpose (2012). - The Real Tragedy of Turning Thirty (2001): I admit I was somewhat amused when I heard a twenty-nine year old man at a bar genuinely bemoan that fact that he was about to turn thirty. The specter of that event looming over him, he said, made him "feel old." So, he told us, he needed to get some things done and find a partner before that happened -- and while he "still had a chance." To those of us who are quite a bit older, and who would never go back to thirty again unless we could guarantee that we could take with us all we have learned from our experiences since, there is something quite sad about feeling "old" at thirty.
 
Aging gay men and lesbians face unique challenges (1997). - One more battle (2007): Gay boomers, who fought discrimination and confronted AIDS, face a new fight as they grow old. - Gay couples enter golden years with more risk. (2004, Alternate Link): Lack of financial protections that marriage affords puts them in jeopardy. - Gay Old Timers (2006): The GLBT community looks ahead to its golden years.  - Young, Old... and Gay (2003): For Teens and Seniors, Gay Life Comes With a Lot of Challenges. -  Gay and Lesbian Aging (& Bibliography) (1993): "Little is known about mid-life and older adults who are gay men or lesbians..." - Gay and Lesbian Aging (1998): "Social service workers are becoming increasingly aware that there exists a large population of older gay and lesbian individuals." - SAGE helps seniors of color celebrate amid support (2005): Growing older in a youth-oriented society can be a difficult process. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people of color, however, face discrimination on multiple levels and aging brings with it complicated - and often painful - challenges.. - Legal Issues Faced By LGBT Seniors (2005): This article is based on testimony provided by the author on July 19, 2005 at a 2005 White House Conference on Aging Pre-Event titled 'Elder Voices: Let Your Stories be Heard,' sponsored by the Chicago Task Force on LGBT Aging, the Chicago Commission on Human Relations, and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. - Seniors pride is a reality (2007): Those of us who were around in the late ’60s took a deep breath when we heard about the Christopher Street riots. We weren’t sure if we were taking a step forward, or putting ourselves into harm’s way. But we did step forward, and we continue to move ahead toward building an honest recognition for ourselves. We still have a lot of hard work to do, and because of our very nature we will get that work done. We’ve come a long way since the day Kennedy was shot, and we should all be very proud of who we are, what we are, and where we are going.  - How Will Today’s Gay Adoptions Change the Future for LGBT Seniors? (2007): Could progressive adoption laws have positive outcomes for today’s gay couples when they look for long-term care? Gay adoptions are on the rise, and adult children are usually the first caregivers for the elder community. These two facts may mean that many more gay couples will have adult children to take care of them in their golden years.

Aging and Gay, and Facing Prejudice in Twilight (2007, See also the Audio Story of Fred and Emile) (Alternate Link, Alternate Link): Even now, at 81 and with her memory beginning to fade, Gloria Donadello recalls her painful brush with bigotry at an assisted-living center in Santa Fe, N.M. Sitting with those she considered friends, “people were laughing and making certain kinds of comments, and I told them, ‘Please don’t do that, because I’m gay.’” The result of her outspokenness, Ms. Donadello said, was swift and merciless. “Everyone looked horrified,” she said. No longer included in conversation or welcome at meals, she plunged into depression. Medication did not help. With her emotional health deteriorating, Ms. Donadello moved into an adult community nearby that caters to gay men and lesbians. “I felt like I was a pariah,” she said, settled in her new home. “For me, it was a choice between life and death.” - Quite Frankly, I Have Doubts About Remaining”: Aging-In-Place and Health Care Access for Rural Midlife and Older Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Individuals (2009): Unique issues faced by LGB adults, such as isolation and the lack of informal support, make obstacles to aging-in-place for LGB adults living in rural communities particularly more difficult to overcome. Future studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the unique physical and psycho-social outcomes of LGB adults aging in rural communities. - The Challenges and Rewards of Life as an Outspoken Bisexual Elder (2002): As a 69-year-old, I can expect to share many of the usual issues of aging that most people encounter -- and being bisexual gives me some additional challenges. The greatest is mandatory activism -- the feeling that I must be out as bisexual in the lesbian and gay community as well as the straight community; that I must educate professionals about bisexuality; that I must speak up for bisexual visibility, presence and inclusion. With so few out bisexual elders, we all have to do as much as we can to find allies, educate others, fight bisexual oppression and support those bisexuals who are less able to be out. 

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force: Aging: National Gay and Lesbian Task Force: Policy Institute: Aging Initiative- Gay and Lesbian Families in the Census: Gay and Lesbian Seniors (2003): 97 percent of U.S. counties have a senior in a same-sex partnership. Nearly three in five U.S. counties (1,847) have more same-sex partnered seniors per capita than the national average of one in a thousand people. Despite their prevalence, gay and lesbian partners do not have access to Social Security survivor benefits or tax-free transfer of survivor IRA contributions.- Older Gays Still Hesitant About Coming Out: Many find it hard to forget threat of being stigmatized (2004): Phil and John have lived together in a house in an affluent suburb west of Boston for 27 years. They began dating in 1974. Two years later, they moved in together, and they have been a couple ever since. Phil, 63, said he never heard the word “homosexual” until he was in the Army in 1963. He has never told his family that he is gay, nor does he tell his friends from church or the veterans community he spends time with. He didn’t want his last name or his hometown published in this article. “I’m not in hiding,” Phil said. “But I guess you could say I haven’t really come out. I’m from a generation where most of my contemporaries would be uncomfortable with it pushed in their faces. And I don’t want anyone to feel uncomfortable.” - Gay Seniors: Stigmas continue into golden years: Aiming to address such issues head-on, Boulder County Aging Services over the past five years has become a national leader in providing services specifically for gay and lesbian seniors. It offers a monthly support group, an annual dance, a directory of gay-friendly service providers, and a respite care program that sends gay or lesbian caregivers on home visits to peers in need. Now, the county is gaining national attention with its newest endeavor, a film and education program - both titled Project Visibility - that aim to alert administrators and staff of nursing homes and assisted living facilities that, despite assumptions otherwise, there are gay clients among them, and they need not be invisible.

Civil Marriage Discrimination & Gay and Lesbian Seniors (2003): They came of age when their families were expected to institutionalize them and approve shock treatments and “change therapies.” When it was considered good corporate policy to ferret out gay employees and fire them. When police officers were on the wrong side of hate crimes. Gay and lesbian seniors have seen breathtaking change in their lifetimes. But not enough. Marriage discrimination pushes many gay seniors into isolation, fear, a precipitous fall into poverty, and a higher risk of homelessness and premature institutionalization. According to a 2002 study in The Gerontologist (a publication of the Gerontological Society of America) the health of gay senior citizens is threatened by pervasive discrimination, requiring that we all ask “profound questions.” - Church Refuses Communion To Elderly Gay Couple (2006): Archbishop Terrence Prendergast of the Halifax archdiocese has demanded that his priests refuse holy communion to Daniel Poirier and Jack Murphy, an elderly gay couple. The unexpected and swift punishment came after the two 69-year-olds published their wedding announcement in a local newspaper. The couple, who have been Roman Catholic their entire lives, were completely shocked..

HHS to Create a National Resource Center for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Elders (2009): HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today announced plans to establish the nation’s first national resource center to assist communities across the country in their efforts to provide services and supports for older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals. - Group for gay, lesbian seniors comes to Fremont (2006, Alternate Link): Although times have changed, painful memories of similar discrimination often linger in the minds of aging gay and lesbian seniors. Those remembrances, coupled with the sense of vulnerability that commonly afflicts seniors, sometimes push elderly gay people back into the closet and out of arm's reach from essential social services. Lavender Seniors of the East Bay wants to change that. The San Leandro-based nonprofit is hosting a free lunch at noon Friday at the Fremont Senior Center to reach out to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people ages 55 and older. - It's Time to Care for the LGBT Aging! (2007): It has been almost 40 years since Stonewall and the rise of the active Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) rights movement. Those who were part of the early movement are now becoming our community elders, and yet our services have not kept up with their needs. Where should LGBT retirees reside? What are their specific health care needs? - Legislation Targets Older Gays (2006): Legislation that would require the state of California to deliver programs and services targeted to LGBT seniors passed a key committee on Tuesday. - Calif. Assembly Passes Gay Seniors Bill (2006): Legislation that requires the state of California to deliver programs and services targeted to LGBT seniors passed the Assembly on Thursday.

The Graying of the Rainbow: Thinking about GLBT aging issues (2001: From Outing Age: Public Policy Issues Affecting Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Elders, a report published by the NGLTF in 2000. - Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual elders are a strength within our community (2002): Lesbian, gay, and bisexual elders are a strength within our community yet there are few, if any, positive images that accurately reflect their lives. More common are lonely and depressed images that do not truly portray the diversity and resilience of the lesbian, gay and bisexual elder community. Their unique psychosocial and health needs are often overlooked by both the elder service network and their wider lesbian, gay and bisexual community. As a result of coming of age during a time of intense bigotry, lesbian, gay, and bisexual elders have learned by default to protect their identity and privacy. As they enter their elder years, the resulting independence may be both advantageous and detrimental; it can enhance their sense of self-reliance and their ability to negotiate challenges, but can also serve to further isolate them from community and support services. - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Elders - Do they really exist? Indeed they do. (PDF Download). - Gay and lesbian rabbis grapple with lifecycle issues, aging (2001). - Elderly gay community gains support (2006): A new resource pack has been launched to help those working in care homes and extra-care housing support older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals... The publication is part of Age Concern’s Opening Doors programme of publications, resources and events for and about older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals [The whole of me. Meeting the needs of older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals living in care homes and extra care housing].

Gay seniors settle into a niche (2006): Jack Norris and Seymour Sirota feared ending up like a lot of older gay men they know — no children, partners dead or gone, families estranged, little to do but sit in their New York City apartments hoping the phone rings. The couple tried retiring in Tampa but never felt comfortable there. They considered Sun City Center, Fla., until they heard about gay men who had moved in and promptly fled back into the closet. "We didn't want to go that route, not at this point in our life," Norris says. RainbowVision, the nation's first retirement village aimed at gay men and lesbians, seemed a perfect fit. A visit to arts-happy Santa Fe, a high-desert cultural oasis with a gay-friendly reputation, sealed the deal. They put their Tampa place and Upper West Side co-op on the market. - Center on Halsted Announces Expansion of Programming for LGBT Seniors (2006): Chicago: Center on Halsted, a first-of-its-kind center in the nation offering social service, cultural and recreational programming for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons, announced today plans to expand its programs for LGBT Seniors.  The Center received a $150,000 grant from Ken O’Keefe and Jason Stephens to launch the expansion of programming designed to meet the needs of LGBT older adults. - Gay, gray and black: a Brooklyn organization helps elderly lesbians and gays find each other and stay out of the closet in the golden years (2005).

Being gay and ageing (2011). - Out and Aging: Gay and Lesbian Boomers (2006): “The signs of denial and anxiety over aging permeate every aspect of our lives. We have no role models for growing old gracefully, only for postponing it. - Why Address the Needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Elders? (2003). - Talking about sexual identity with older men (2005): Despite the obstacles facing social workers in talking to older men about their sexual identity, it is essential that they do not ignore this aspect of people's lives. Therefore it is important that social workers open themselves up to the possibility that an older man might be gay or bisexual and help construct environments that enable the disclosure of this aspect of his identity. - When the young date the old: How does racism fit in? (2000): “People generally refuse to look at sexual attraction as politicized,” Mukamal said. “But it’s not uncommon to see young gay Asian males with 40- to 50-year-old white males. There seems to be a trade-off.” Lee answered: “It’s perfectly fair for an Asian to look for something an older gay man has to offer — elders are respected in some middle-eastern and Asian societies. - LGB Mind Matters: Looking at Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual mental health issues.

What are you really afraid of? Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex ageing, ageism, and activism (2002): As a researcher in gerontology with a background in education, advocacy and policy development, it has long been apparent to me that gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex (glbti) older people almost never rate a mention in aged care in Australia. - Alcohol and Seniors: Alcohol Dependence and Misuse among Older Gay and Lesbian People (2006, Alternate Link): It is important to point out at the outset that we do not know a lot about alcohol dependence and misuse among older people who are lesbian or gay, in part because we don’t know that much about the problem in the younger people. There are a lot of myths, stereotypes and misconceptions in this area.  - How does ageing affect older people with marginalised sexual identity? (PDF Download): What has received less attention is the way that older lesbians, gays and bisexuals have experienced the increasingly open sexualisation of identity, while at the same time becoming subject to the convention that sexuality is inappropriate for older age. - For seniors, being active in SAGE is a wise choice (2003): SAGE is also involved in the Rainbow Aging Awareness Project, joining with SAGE-Queens, Pride Senior Network and Griot Circle, a group of gay senior African-Americans who meet in Brooklyn. The Rainbow project is dedicated to extending awareness of the needs of L.G.B.T. seniors from all walks of life.

Gray gays: Aging gay men and lesbians face unique challenges (1997): Few gay or lesbian publications include groups for seniors in their resource listings. One Boston newspaper lists 18 support groups for gay and lesbian youth in New England, and only two for gay men and lesbians over 40. - Old and Gay: Is the Closet the Place to Retire? (2003, A Fictional Account by Gail Ellis based on recent research): Although this account is purely fictional, it portrays many of the experiences that elderly gays and lesbians living in a predominately heterosexist society must endure. This is borne out repeatedly in a disheartening report (1997) on needs in Winnipeg, conducted by the Sum Quod Sum Foundation Inc. This foundation is mandated to provide facilities, services and educational programming for older gay men and lesbians. Gay men and lesbians 55 years of age and over were surveyed to identify their needs. They found most senior lesbians and gay men were living alone, at incomes below the poverty line, and isolated from siblings, children, and extended families. Many are also isolated from the larger gay and lesbian community, and are seriously at risk. Their plight is accentuated by the reluctance of existing senior's organizations to address gay positive programming. - Opening the center doors to gay, lesbian seniors (2007): Yarmouth Senior LGBT Project welcomes Capewide constituency... Accordingly, they want the Project to be seen as open relevant not only to gay and lesbian seniors, but to heterosexuals, and to people in other age groups. “I’ve been going to the programs and it’s not unusual at all for other than gays and lesbians to be there,” said state Rep. Cleon Turner, who is on the panel for this month’s program. “We want it to be inclusive,” Isadore said, “and it has been so far.” “Actually, it’s an education for both sides,” said Marciante. Ultimately, she said, the aim is for gay and lesbian seniors to be completely integrated into the center’s services. “Hopefully, someday we wouldn’t need to call it a project,” she said. “It’ll just be part of what we do.”

Gay elder advocates criticize White House (2005): Gay and lesbian advocacy groups believe gay aging issues were purposefully left off the table in this week's White House Conference on Aging. The White House conference, held every 10 years, was strongly scripted this week to eliminate resolutions from the floor or other avenues for gay rights advocates to bring community concerns to light, gay organizational leaders said. They had hoped to broach issues like funding of elder care services for gays and lesbians and economic security for a growing number of gay seniors. - Historic Breakthrough: Federal Aging Report Explicitly Includes Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Elders (2006): The long-awaited Final Report of the 2005 White House Conference on Aging (WHCoA), released by the Administration on Aging, marks a milestone in the fight for the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders. Months of intensive organizing, including town hall meetings held around the country and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force -convened Make Room for All diversity summit last December -- a counterpoint to the WHCoA -- have paid off in the explicit inclusion of LGBT elders in the report.

Golden Gay Years in Newsweek (2001). - The Advocate: Older gay males report on their lives in 1978. - The Greening of the Senior Gay (2002). - Will you love me when I'm old and gay? (2003). - Gay & Lesbian Aging Issues: Care at the End of the Rainbow (2000). - Demystifying Gay Men's Adulthood (2000). - The Pause That Refreshes–Not! - Menopause for two, and other humorous factors of gay aging (2001). - American Society on Aging Honors LGBT Leaders (2003). - Gay Midlife Crisis: Do we have to have a mid-life crisis? Couldn’t we have a mid-life celebration instead? As a coach, one of the contributions I want to make is to assist young gay men to develop a vision for life early so they can avoid the crisis at mid-life. The questioning and second-guessing career choices, the tossing aside a relationship because it takes work, the conflict of living up to other people’s expectations and the pitfalls of keeping up with Mr. and Mr. Jones. What would life at 40 look like if we all had clear visions when we graduated college? What would life be if we planned from those visions and adjusted course instead of changing highways? We can make our own mid-lives more joyous and help our youth evolve to a higher level of acceptance through this inquiry. - History of LGBT Issues at the American Society on Aging.

The Challenges and Rewards of Life as an Outspoken Bisexual Elder (2002): As a 69-year-old, I can expect to share many of the usual issues of aging that most people encounter -- and being bisexual gives me some additional challenges. The greatest is mandatory activism -- the feeling that I must be out as bisexual in the lesbian and gay community as well as the straight community; that I must educate professionals about bisexuality; that I must speak up for bisexual visibility, presence and inclusion. With so few out bisexual elders, we all have to do as much as we can to find allies, educate others, fight bisexual oppression and support those bisexuals who are less able to be out. - Growing Older and Being Trans (2002): At True Spirit Conference this year, Jude Patton and Hawk Stone presented a session entitled “Growing Older and Being Trans.” Patton and Stone are both older transmen; their presence alone, even before examining the amount of work they’ve done for the trans community over the last few decades, is a welcome indication to all of the young people (and I’m calling everyone my age at 27 or younger, young) that we do have a future: that older trans people exist, and that we can plan for our futures despite the twin obstacles of aging and being trans.

Inclusive Congregations: Creating a Welcome Home for LGBT Older Adults (2003):  "It's not so bad," he told me. "Me, my partner and a couple of close friends make a day of it: We go to church, go out to eat, find things to do. It's worth the drive to have a church where we can be welcomed, as family, worshiping God in a community of faith. I could never abandon the Presbyterian Church, even though it has tried to abandon me." What can -- what should -- churches and synagogues be doing for their LGBT members? How can religious communities, struggling with diminishing resources, challenges from an increasingly secular society, and profound differences in social and theological perspectives genuinely become a house of prayer for all people? How can a gay elder such as John find genuine support in the church as he reaches the final decades of his life? I write as the pastor of a smallish (less than 200 members) Presbyterian congregation in Miami. Seven years ago, after a period of study, our congregation adopted a statement of nondiscrimination regarding LGBT people, declaring that our house of prayer would be welcoming to all people, regardless of sexual orientation. At the time of the declaration, four people in the church were openly gay or lesbian; today, the congregation is around 30 percent LGBT, and a significant number of older adults are an active part of that population.

Oldest Living Lesbian Tells All (2000): Black History Month usually focuses public attention on those movers and shakers who everyone knows by name: the activists, writers, artists and entertainers who have left their mark on American culture and society at large. What we don´t often hear, however, are more private stories of people like Ruth Ellis, who, as a Black lesbian, has quietly lived in two minorities for more than 100 years. Ellis speaks matter–of–factly of events and eras that often unsettle younger listeners. Born in Springfield, Illinois in 1899, Ellis grew up listening to first–hand accounts of slavery on her father´s knee. So far, she´s lived through segregation, the civil–rights movement and the simmering racial tensions of the late 20th century‹not to mention great socials strides made by women and lesbians, in specific. 

As Hard To Grow Old As It Was To Be Young (2001, Alternate Link): When Ruth Ellis died in Michigan not long ago at the age of 101, a beloved character among the elderly and the gay community in Detroit, she should have been more famous. She was the oldest known lesbian in America. But it was not the fact that she was homosexual that made her special. It was the fact that she let it be known. Of the estimated 70,000 centenarians now living in the United States, only one, Ms. Ellis, was so public about being gay. Of the million and a half nonagenarians, just a handful are widely known to be gay. There is a reason for that, and it isn't because so few old people are homosexual. It's because they grew up before the American gay rights movement began to free homosexuals to be honest about themselves. - Program ready to help aging gay, lesbian population (2006): Once a week, Luis Oropeza and Jimmy Ho get together and discuss theater, art, social work - their mutual careers - and a host of other topics. Each brings his own experience to the conversation. Oropeza has introduced Ho to Bay Area theater, and Ho shows him aspects of Chinese and Asian culture. Both men also are gay and enjoy analyzing and sharing their impressions of gay culture. The ease of their lunchtime conversations belies their vast difference in age. Oropeza is 63 years old; Ho is 26. Their weekly meetings are part of one program among several cropping up across the country to address the needs of aging lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people among the first generation to meet wide acceptance when they declared their sexual orientation. 

OutSmart Magazine, Special Issue on Aging: - Rebels & Survivors. - Aging well with Hal Kooden. - Community groups for older gays. - The graying of the rainbow: thinking about GLBT aging issues. - The pause that refreshes. - Village elders. - Workout. =
- Elderly Advocates Raise Concerns about the Rights of Older Gay Couples (2004): If Lois Johnson were married to a man, she would be financially protected if poor health forced him into a nursing home. The state could not force her to sell their shared home. She would not be forced to spend down their shared bank account to pay for his care. But because Johnson is a lesbian who has been barred from marriage, elderly advocates say, the state would offer none of the same protections to Claire Barden, her partner of 40 years.

Newspaper reaches out to GLBT seniors (2000): A newspaper aimed at an often overlooked segment of the gay and lesbian community—senior citizens—began publication in March. The Networker, produced by the Pride Senior Network, a nonprofit New York City advocacy group, intends to reach the elderly that ordinarily wouldn't seek out information that would benefit them. - Emerging Retirement Options for Older Lesbians and Gays (2000): In the last year the the New York Times ran a front-page article describing an effort by developers to build lesbian and gay retirement communities. The article caused many to consider whether there is a need for lgbt nursing homes, assisted living complexes, or retirement communities. Subsequent articles assumed that there is a universal need and desire by the aging lgbt population to march en masse into such defined communities. Such writings misjudge the vivid complexity of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender populations. There are no simplistic solutions to the emerging housing and retirement needs of the lgbt community. There have been no systematic or quantitative studies of urban and rural aging lgbt populations to carefully ascertain their housing needs and options. Clearly, there are multiple answers to the housing needs of our aging population. This issue of The NETWORKER highlights how many in our community have begun to address this issue. Pride Senior Network hopes these articles will become a catalyst for discussion and increased attention. We need creativity to meet the challenge of providing housing and care for lgbt seniors.

None of us knew that Bob was depressed (2012): He wrote a book on gay middle-age happiness, then he killed himself. The tragic life of Bob Bergeron. Four months after his death, Bob Bergeron’s suicide note remains stubbornly haunting. Bergeron, a handsome 49-year-old New York psychotherapist, killed himself some time around New Year: on Saturday a gathering in his honour was held at an East Village hotel. His friends and clients remain baffled by his death. Bergeron was living some people’s idea of a dream gay life: sexy, outwardly optimistic, an apartment in the gay-popular neighbourhood of Chelsea and about to publish a book, The Right Side of Forty: The Complete Guide to Happiness for Gay Men at Midlife and Beyond. If ever there was a poster boy for the book, it appeared to be its author. However, a New York Times article in March revealed that Bergeron felt he had “peaked” at 35, and described his worries over ageing, loneliness and whether his book would bring fame. Scott Boute, a former partner, found Bergeron dead in his apartment on January 5, a plastic bag over his head. - Not Waiting to Say Goodbye (2012).

When we grow old: Atlanta’s gay seniors discuss hopes, fears of twilight years (2007): A 2006 Zogby survey sponsored by the Lesbian & Gay Aging Issues Network of the American Society on Aging asked 1,000 gay men and lesbians between ages 40 and 61 from across the U.S. about their lifestyles and plans for retirement. Concerns over housing, finances and health — which mirror their heterosexual counterparts — took the forefront. But as deVries explained, gay and lesbian Boomers will enter mid-life and retirement largely on their own. More than half of the lesbians who answered the survey reported not having children, and about three-fourths of the gay men reported being childless. Two-thirds of the surveyed gay men did not have long-term partners at the time of the survey, compared to about half of the lesbian respondents. “Both of those groups, partners and children, are the ones most frequently called upon as caregivers,” deVries said. - Gay elders emerge from long isolation (Boston Globe, 2003) (Alternate Link): They grew up in an era when the words ''gay'' and ''lesbian'' were rarely spoken. They came of age when members of the US Senate sought to purge homosexuals from the civil service. Convinced that homosexuality was a mental illness and a moral failing, many of them tried to bury it in psychiatrists' offices and wedding chapels. ''My neurons were formed in a different world,'' said Bruce Steiner, 72. But yesterday afternoon, Steiner slow-danced in a ballroom at the Brookline Holiday Inn with his partner, James Anthony, 66. The couple, bedecked in beads, were joined under the soft lights by other gay and lesbian seniors who, like Steiner, had come to accept their homosexuality only later in life. They were part of Boston Pride's first-ever official event for gay seniors: the ''About Time Tea Dance.'' -

GAYging: Growing old gay and lesbian (2007): The aging process brings many new challenges and opportunities to individuals, families and society. Although there are more similarities than differences between heterosexual and homosexual older adults, growing old gay and lesbian does present some unique challenges to the aging process. This presentation will highlight the unique aspects of growing older as a gay man or lesbian, highlighting the implications for service providers. The preliminary findings from a research study looking at the retirement experience of older gay men and lesbians will also be discussed. - Gay men face unique challenges as they grow older (PDF Download N/A). - Someone is killing the gay boys of Verona: "Mark Roeder manages again to capture the thoughts and dreams of a young gay man. But this time, he goes even further. He deals with ways in which older gay men can be mentors and role models."

Homophobia and Unequal Treatment Limit Quality of Life for GLBT Elders (2000): Homophobia and neglect appear widespread in nursing homes. In a recent survey of nursing home social workers, more than half said their coworkers were intolerant or condemning of homosexuality among residents, while most other respondents avoided answering the question. Other studies report that the staff in one nursing home staff refused to bathe a resident because they did not want to touch "the lesbian," and a home care assistant threatened to "out" a gay client if he reported her negligent care. - GLBT Generations works to address diversity awareness (2003): A survey was conducted among GLBT elders in the Twin Cities to find out their concerns and perceptions about senior housing and service needs. The results of that survey were shared in a community meeting last fall at Spirit of the Lakes United Church of Christ in Minneapolis, which is the unofficial hub of activity for GLBT Generations. “The perception that came out of that survey is that care providers are not receptive to our needs,” says John Yoakam, another GLBT Generations board member. Data from that survey indicated that 56 percent of respondents felt that existing senior housing and social services would not be sensitive to their needs and that 92 percent were interested in receiving services from programs that were identified as GLBT-sensitive.

Senior Gays Act as Role Models (2000): Here is an example of how that vibrant energy and true commitment can be an inspiration to us all. Jim and Dave have been together for 23 wonderful years. They live together on beautiful, Rainbow Ridge Farm in Illinois and celebrate their love for each other everyday, considering themselves lucky to have found each other. They fly a rainbow flag outside day and night as a proud symbol of their community. - Gay Youth Offer to Foster Adult-Youth Partnerships (2000): Youth-Adult partnerships need to be cultivated. They do not pop out of existence and into reality. And it may be that youth have to take the first step. Don’t be afraid! Ways to start include calling your local GLBT group and get involved. Most groups are volunteer facilitated. What group is going to turn away a helping hand? Most of the time, adults are very willing to encompass youth in whatever the task is at hand because they recognize we have abilities and talents that our movement needs. If you’re looking at the national level, create a resume and send it to a national organization without youth on staff or on the board. Insist that you are willing to help solve problems. A lot of the generational stereotypes are just waiting to be proven wrong. - Eldon Murray: A Senior Citizen in the Halls of Fame (2000):  In 1998, One Institute and the International Gay and Lesbian Archives named him as one of only 31 pioneers of the gay movement. - Reestablishing Our Elders to Their Rightful Place in Society (1999): Overall, I'm hoping that we come around to the notion that elderly individuals are essential for our mental and emotional well-being, and that we someday welcome their presence. If you agree, then for starters, when an older LGBT individual smiles at you as he or she is walking your way, smile back. We've rendered them invisible, and its our job to restore them to their honorable place as our mentors and friends.

Equal Rights Protection Needed for Elderly Gays (2000): After 42 years together, the lesbian couple needed nursing home care. Their relatives swooped in, put them in separate institutions and refused to let them see each other. Their tragedy, described in a new report that should serve as a national wake-up call, spotlights the special vulnerability of older gay Americans. At the age when they are least able to protect themselves, gay retirees are cruelly victimized by discriminatory attitudes, regulations and laws. - LGB Ageing (2002): Growing older can lead to mental distress resulting from fears of loneliness, health, and income - a situation no different for LGB than for heterosexual elderly . However, the little research there is into the needs of elderly gays suggests that they might be better equipped than their heterosexual contemporaries. Until recently they have been an invisible group, ignored by gerontologists whose research into the elderly means only the heterosexual elderly and at the same time overlooked in research on homosexuality that focuses on the young. - An Elderly Gay Man's Story (1987): I'm 69, married, retired in 1980, My wife is blind and an invalid. I have a son and three daughters, all married, and six grandchildren, whom I love very dearly. I lack formal education, but love to read and in just the last few years have learned that my "inclinations" were "inflicted" upon other men also. Hence, my experiences with other men have been very few and most of them since my wife left my bed a dozen years ago. - Grandads together (2001): John and I have been together 13 years. (John would say for 12 years and two months. That is the difference between us. He is exact; I am easy.) We were both previously married. Between us we have eight children and nine grandchildren. We are retired. John was in a family business in Atlanta. I was an Episcopal priest for 19 years before I came out. I then became a social worker for the last 10 years of my working career. It has taken us a long time to reach this point in our lives: secure with ourselves and each other, able to be just John and John. 

Senior Citizen Wins Equality for Lesbian and Gay Relationships (2001):  The Washington Supreme Court has ruled that a state doctrine, which has provided protection to unmarried heterosexual partners for years, also protects lesbian and gay families, Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund said Thursday. - Fighting for Fairness and Equality Through the Legal System (1999): In response to the unique needs of older lesbians and gay men, Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund made a commitment in 1998 to expand our impact litigation and advocacy efforts on their behalf. As a Skadden Fellow, I will spend the next two years as a staff attorney at our national headquarters in New York specializing in legal issues affecting older lesbians and gay men, and working with individuals and groups to address homophobic discrimination and abuse targeted at older gay people. - Older Lesbians and Gay Men (2002): Through impact litigation, education, and policy advocacy, Lambda Legal seeks to ensure that older lesbians and gay men are protected against discrimination and receive treatment that respects their dignity, individuality, and privacy. Moreover, Lambda Legal works to increase awareness of the importance of advance legal planning and executing legal documents among older lesbians and gay men, ensuring that their wishes about medical decision-making at the end of life, and property distribution after death, are respected. - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Discussion (hosted by Monroe): Forum to explore issues related to being over 50 and self-identified as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgendered (2000):  There are many of us in this society who wake up one day and realize that we are an aging adult, over the age of 50, who find that we are men attracted to men, women attracted to women or we are attracted to both men and women. In addition, there are many of us who feel we either like to dress up in the clothes of the opposite gender or feel that we are men trapped in the bodies of women or women trapped in the bodies of men.

Viagra, the blue revolution (2001): When I was a young man, before going out to meet someone for sex, I always had to come before I actually went out. If I didn't, I would come far too quickly and spoil the encounter with the person I was meeting. That changes slowly with age and actually gets better in some ways . Think sex and there you are an erection!  At some point, however, the equipment develops a mind of it's own and starts getting as hard as a broom handle at three in the morning but faced with the upturned bottom of a beautiful man, refuses to wake up. - Aching Bones, Wrinkles and Viagra (2001):  This was an energetic opening to a discussion between a group of young people with backgrounds as diverse as New York City: African American, Asian, Caribbean, Latino/a, Native American and white; and seniors from the lesbian and gay community: Ellen Ensig-Brodsky, 67, from Pride Senior Network Ron Walker, 60, from Gay Men of African Descent (GMAD) and writer Rex Wilder, 80. This was a part of the Summer Training Institute run by Project Reach, a youth and adult people of color run organization serving multi-racial and multi-sexual communities - lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, two spirit, intersex and straight. This was one of many sessions in a ten week series of events, visits and creative work around the issues of racism, sexism, ageism and homophobia held at Reach's second floor premises right on the border of Manhattan's Lower East Side and Chinatown.  - Older Gay Men Turning to Viagra N/A. - Ageing Gay Men: Lessons from the Sociology of Embodiment (2005). 

The web site for Division 44: The Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Issues: Are GLBT elderly issues being ignored by this group? See Weblinks Section. - A New Constituency for Planned Giving (1996): "A decade ago the mere notion of walking into Los Angeles' Gay and Lesbian Community Services Center made Elliott nervous. Closeted in his professional life, he drove by twice before he could muster the courage to step inside the center for the first time when he retired. Now several of the properties he has accumulated over the years will go to the center. A scholarship fund for gay students at the University of Southern California and the AIDS Healthcare Foundation..." - GLBT Elders: Tarnish on the Golden Years (2004): Jane was Mary's life partner for 25 years. Last month, Mary died. Although Jane was beneficiary of Mary's life insurance, she gets no financial help from the government as she would if she'd been Mary's wife. The Social Security Administration doesn't recognize same-sex partners, and, without Mary's monthly check, Jane worries she won't be able to pay the bills. Another concern is Mary's sister. She is trying to force Jane out of the house she shared with her partner for 25 years because Jane's name was never officially put on the deed and she was not her partner's legal next of kin. This scenario illustrates how the golden years can dull when an older adult must deal with lack of legal protection, bias, and discrimination, in addition to other issues associated with aging. According to a study called Outing Age: Public Policy Issues Affecting Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Elders released in the fall of 2000 by the Policy Institute of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, these are the realities facing gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered (GLBT) elders:   - Study: Aging Gay Couples Face Fiscal Burden (2004): Same-sex couples face colossal fiscal burdens as they age -- including the potential loss of Social Security and tax benefits -- due to the denial of their right to marry. Same-sex couples face colossal fiscal burdens as they age -- including the potential loss of tens of thousands of dollars in taxes and an average of $5,000 in yearly Social Security survivor benefits -- due to the denial of their right to marry, according to new research by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC).

GALHA Acts on Elderly Gays (1998): The Gay and Lesbian Humanist Association (GALHA) has made a submission to the Royal Commission on the Long Term Care for the Elderly concerning the needs of elderly lesbians and gay men. - Organization aims to include elderly (2001): "An effort is under way in metropolitan Washington, D.C., to establish an organization that provides a wide array of health-related services for older Gay people, a population that aging advocates contend is too often overlooked."

Implementing Gay-Sensitive Services (1997): The Center for Healthy Aging, formerly known as Senior Health and Peer Counseling, in Santa Monica, Calif., is a comprehensive social service agency that has been serving the needs of older adults for over 20 years. Our agency recognizes the need for culturally sensitive outreach programs, but it had never looked at the needs of gay and lesbian older adults. In January 1995 we began an outreach program for older gay men and lesbians. This article will explain the process we went through and some of the challenges we encountered and suggest ways you can make your agency or practice more gay and lesbian sensitive. - Finding a way to reach the gay elderly: Local providers go to gay elders themselves to see what they need (2001) N/A. - Creating Welcoming Environments for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Elders (2003): Why This Guide?  The amount and variety of resources available on the topic of aging in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities has grown significantly over the last ten years.  These resources include published academic research, video documentaries, photography exhibits, newspaper and magazine articles, policy papers and recommendations as well as more and more service delivery models that recognize the specific needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender elders.  For many that work in the field of gerontology these resources, while invaluable, are not truly accessible because time and/or technological tools are not available.  This resource guide was created with the hope that it will allow for this much needed information to be more easily utilized by both direct service workers, senior staff and policy makers. This guide includes much of the general information that has been circulated in recent years on understanding and assessing the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender elders.  It also includes more specific and locally accessible resources for those working in or around the greater Boston area.  - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Persons (2013, About.com): A major challenge in meeting their needs is the limited research on older persons who are gay or lesbian. Even fewer studies have examined the experiences of bisexual and transgender elders. Existing research suggests that older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender adults are satisfied with their lives. The concerns they express about aging are often the same that other older people typically report. Research highlights several issues that are particularly important for LGBT elders.

LGBT Elders and Public Policy: An Overview (2000). Much of what has been written by and about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders over the past 20 years has focused on the psychosocial aspects of aging in a heterosexist society. Moving beyond this narrow focus, growing numbers of activists in the field of aging and more and more LGBT civil rights organizations are now starting to pay attention to the complex arena of public policy. - Assisted Living Standards to Recognize Sexual Orientation (2003):  The Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has added respect for "residents' habits and patterns of living (including lifestyle choices related to sexual orientation)" to the requirements in its accreditation manual for assisted living facilities. JCAHO is a national nonprofit that develops quality-of-care standards for healthcare organizations and evaluates institutions for compliance with those standards. The new policy is a result of several years of internal discussion and low-key advocacy by outside organizations including Senior Action in a Gay Environment in New York City and ASA's Lesbian and Gay Aging Issues Network. It comes on the heels of a similar JCAHO standard added to the JCAHO accreditation manual for nursing homes in 2002.  - Project Visibility (2006, Colorado): Seven years ago Boulder County Aging Services Division (BCASD) recognized that one under-served segment of the older adult population in Boulder County Colorado was the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) older adult. First, there was a need to acknowledge the existence of older LGBTs from service providers. At that time, LGBT older adults were virtually “invisible” in the county. Secondly, there was a need to provide training to cultivate a more sensitive and aware aging services system in the county. Project Visibility as a training program grew out of these needs. Project Visibility puts a “face” on aging as an LGBT, and subsequently brings a new awareness of how to provide culturally-competent care to the older LGBT. - Gray and Gay: Our Community Responds: Issues and Action Strategies (2004, Cleveland): Gray Pride Interagency Taskforce on Gay and Lesbian Aging... Participants in the dialogue series identified numerous barriers to local older gays and lesbians accessing services, housing, employment, and volunteer opportunities. These barriers can be arranged according to the source primarily responsible for change. System barriers can be a political, legal, or economic nature, while organizational barriers relate to impediments in agency or facility policies, procedures, or staffing. Barriers at the group level include those resulting from membership in or identity with the gay and lesbian community, and barriers at the individual level concern personal characteristics or experiences which inhibit accessing resources and opportunities.

Collaborating to Support Lesbian and Gay Caregivers for People With Alzheimer's (2002):  The New York City chapter of the Alzheimer's Association has many specialized caregiver support groups, including groups specifically for spouses, adult children and daughters only. People who share the same family role often have an immediate empathy for each other. The concerns of an adult daughter caring for a mother are significantly different from those of a wife caring for her husband of many years. Even though individual situations might vary greatly, the experience of being in the same caregiver role provides the framework for making connections and sharing experiences and feelings. Despite other differences, role commonality creates a bond. A similar framework applies to gay men and lesbians, especially older adults, many of whom have spent much of their lifetimes hiding an important part of their lives from the larger society. Many older gay men and lesbians were rejected by their biological families long ago, disowned and discarded solely because of their sexual orientation. Even some younger gay men and lesbians from accepting families have internalized the strong societal message that being different is wrong. It is difficult for them to be open and trusting in a mixed group.... We are pleased to report that other chapters of the Alzheimer's Asociation, as well as other organizations, have looked to us for information and guidance in helping them set up similar groups in their area. This has become a very positive model of cooperative partnering for both SAGE and the Alzheimer's Asociation. It provides a much-needed service, and we hope to see more groups of this kind in the future. - UK Alzheimer's Society: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Support. - Alzheimer's support group addressing LGBTs' needs (2013): A first-of-its-kind support group that will address the unique challenges facing LGBT caregivers, and the caregivers to LGBT Alzheimer's patients, will hold its inaugural session Saturday, Jan. 26, at 10 a.m. at the Howard Brown Health Center (HBHC), with subsequent meetings to take place - at the same time and location—on the fourth Saturday of every month. The Alzheimer's Association Greater Illinois Chapter is hosting the group and providing the trained facilitator, who also serves on the organization's diversity committee. The association had been building bridges to the LGBT community in diversity initiatives. Under Stephanie Herro, manager of support services and an out lesbian, the support group came to fruition.

Birch H (2009). Dementia, Lesbians and Gay Men. Paper 15, Alzheimer’s Australia. PDF Download. This paper was commissioned by Alzheimer’s Australia to promote an informed discussion about the issues aecting lesbians or gay men with dementia or caring for someone with dementia. It addresses the issues associated with the interaction between service providers and lesbian and gay men with dementia and their family carers, including the complexity of family relationships and barriers that may aect care provision and quality of life. The focus of this paper is on lesbian and gay seniors, including their same-sex partners. Not all people with dementia are seniors; however younger lesbians and gay men living with dementia may have a number of similar concerns and needs to those of lesbian and gay seniors. This paper also includes information about the needs of younger lesbians and gay men who are supporting a heterosexual family member living with dementia. Some issues and concerns identied in this paper are shared by transgender people, as well as additional specic issues such as the impact of medical interventions on ageing, including surgical changes and hormone treatments over a long period of time. This paper encompasses the needs of those members of the transgender community to the extent to which they identify themselves as gay or lesbian, but does not address the specic needs of transgender people.

Michigan Project for Informed Public Policy (2012). Research Fact Sheet: What does mental health re4search tell us about ... A lifetime impact of stigma and discrimination on LGBT Elders? PDF Download. Suicide risk is directly related to both physical and mental health status. Suicide is considered more frequently by LGBT seniors who are psychologically distressed or are isolated and without a caring support system of friends and family. • In a national community-based survey (5) of over 2,500 LGBT older adults in 2011: 39% seriously thought of taking their own lives. This includes 35% of lesbians, 40% bisexual women, 37% of gay men, 39% of bisexual men. Significantly, 71% of transgender older adults have considered suicide. Among LGBT people who contemplated suicide, 39% report that their suicide thoughts were related to their sexual orientation or gender identity. (2) • According to one study, more suicide attempts were reported among those older adults who were physically attacked. (2) Older survey participants in another study reported that 82% had been victimized at least once and 64% have been victimized three or more times in their lifetime. (5) • Less suicide ideation was associated with lower internalized homophobia and more people knowing about the (survey) participants’ sexual orientation. (1) • Some research reports that a majority of LGBT seniors – living alone, without life partners or children to rely on – are at an increased risk for depression, substance abuse, unnecessary institutionalization and premature death. (7) In a 2011 national survey of over 2,500 LGBT older adults, 31% had symptoms of clinical depression and 24% said they had been diagnosed with anxiety; 39% of transgender older adults had been diagnosed with anxiety.

Brown, Maria (2009). LGBT Aging and Rhetorical Silence. Sexuality Research & Social Policy, 6(4): 65-78. PDF Download. The exclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) elders from queer and gerontological theories has resulted in the silencing of LGBT older adults and their experiences. Historically, this silencing has left LGBT elders without adequate social or material supports and has isolated them from both the LGBT and the older-adult communities, as well as the agencies serving those communities. The author defines this silencing as a rhetorical move rendering elders invisible in queer theory and queerness invisible in gerontological theory and argues that the producers of queer and gerontological theory, from a position of power within these discourses, silence and ignore LGBT elders’ rhetorical activities. The author further argues that although many LGBT elders have worked to arrange material and social supports for themselves and their peers, their activities have become audible only relatively recently, due to the activism of middle-aged and older LGBT members of human service and academic networks.

Orel NA (2004). Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Elders: Expressed Needs and Concerns Across Focus Groups. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 43(2/3): 57-77. PDF Download. Although the Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual (GLB) senior population is growing, there has been little attention given to identifying and understanding the needs and concerns of this growing population. This paper will present results from a series of focus groups and in-depth interviews with GLB elders from three select areas in the Midwest. Content analysis of the expressed beliefs, attitudes, and opinions from participants revealed that there were seven major areas of importance for GLB elders (physical health, legal rights, housing, spirituality, family, mental health, and social networks). The needs, concerns, range of issues, common issues, opinions, and attitudes expressed across the three focus groups are discussed and recommendations are provided.

Gallanis TP (2002). Aging and the Nontraditional Family. University of Memphis Law Review, 32: 607-642. PDF Download. This Article is divided into two parts. Part I provides background in the form of demographic data, drawn from the recent census, on the number of elderly Americans and the number of Americans in domestic partnerships. It also provides a projection of the future growth of the elderly population; regrettably, analogous projections about the growth of domestic partnerships are not available. Part II of the Article then explores three important issues facing same-sex domestic partners at least one of whom is elderly: first, health-care decisionmaking; second, access to housing; and third, age discrimination within the gay and lesbian community. Significant in themselves, these issues are of particular relevance for this symposium, because at the core of each issue is the tension between conventional and expansive notions of who counts as "family." The Article concludes with a select bibliography on the topic of gay and lesbian elders, in the hope that it will be a resource for future scholarship in this area.

Family.net's Elderly GLBT  Health Issues (2003, Human Rights Campaign Foundation): - Introduction: A growing number of health care providers are learning about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender health care, but most cannot yet be called lesbian- and gay-friendly - or perhaps even knowledgeable about our issues. A significant number of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender seniors, meanwhile, are also less comfortable being open about their orientation than younger people who came of age in more tolerant times. As a result, many elderly lesbian and gay people do not seek necessary health care; and even when they do, fears about what they will encounter may keep them from being fully honest about themselves, their family and their health concerns...  Cancer. - Caregiving. - Depression. - Heart disease and strokes. - HIV and AIDS. - Transgender health issues. - Health centers. - Senior health links. - The future of aging in New York State: BRIEF, Lesbian And Gay Issues (2003, PDF Download): "Even as we enter the 21st century, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) subjects remain particularly controversial... Based on the 1990 census, a conservative estimate is 150,000 to 300,000 LGBT seniors residing in New York State. Yet, there are only five programs targeted specifically to this population in all of New York State, four in New York City and one just emerging in Syracuse... Some of the barriers to such support faced by the gay population are apparent in a recently published report by the Brookdale Center on Aging  of Hunter College." - Gay and Lesbian Families in the Census: Gay and Lesbian Seniors: one / thousand (PDF Download).

Pride Senior Network N/A. (Archive Link, To 2005) - Gay and Lesbian Association of Retiring Persons (GLARP). -  Yahoo's "Prime Timer International List" (To 2004). - Original Prime Timers Worldwide. - Grey Gay Guide (Australia). - Old Lesbians Organizing for Change. - SAGE /Upstate: Serving Older Gays, Lesbians, Bisexuals and Transgendered Persons in the Upstate Communities of Central New York (To 2004): (New Web Site: From 2004 to 2012) Current Newsletter; PDF Download (2005 to 2008). - Past Newsletters (To 2008). - Internet Resources (To 2008). - Community Groups for Older Gay Folk (2001).

American Society on Aging (ASA): Article Searches: Gay. - Lesbian. - Bisexual. - Transgender. - The American Society on Aging (ASA)'s Lesbian and Gay Aging Issues Network (LGAIN) (To 2012). - From LGAIN: Outword Newsletter (To 2007): - Online Article Index (To 2008). - LGAIN Articles mostly only available by becoming a member (To 2007). - ASA's popular Summer Series on Aging is continuing through July 21, bringing half-day and full-day intensives on a range of key issues for professionals in aging... The following list highlights intensives of particular interest to LGAIN members (June, 2000). - LGBT Aging Project.

Grey Gay Guide: listing places where both older and younger can meet other like minded people: " It includes the GrayGay Guide with in-depth reviews of over 2000 bars, clubs, restaurants, saunas, hotels and beaches that welcome mature men and admirers world-wide. Plus extensive resources and links such as personal ads, bulletin boards, organizations and publications." - CAFFMOS the seniors site for older, more mature gay men (To 2005). - CAFFMOS Community: The Older Gentlemans Club: The Caffmos Community has been created as a secure and safe area for older, more mature gay men, silverdaddies and their admirers to share ideas, experiences and companionship with like minded friends. It has been constructed with both Bronze and Gold membership levels. - Gay & Lesbian Elderly: Photographs by Richard Renaldi..

The Ultimate "Planet Out" Guide to Queer Movies (Subject: Aging/Elders) (To 2009). - LGBT elders on screen: queer film festival circuit offers range of images (July, 2000). -  Elder Gays and Lesbians in Literature and Film (1997). - A Century of Lesbian Pride (Review of two 1999 documentaries about lesbian elders: "Living With Pride" and "Golden Threads.") - The Confession: Directed by Carl Pfirman, is a short dramatic film about two elderly gay men which explores love, betrayal and grief within a 35 year long relationship (2001). - Pink Sunset Villa (2003): A Home for Gay and Lesbian Elders. A film by Tjarda Hockstra. - Silent Pioneers (1986): Gay and Lesbian Elders. A film by Pat Snyder, Lucy Winer, Harvey Marks and Paula deKoenigsberg in consultation with SAGE. - Oscar Nominated Director to Document LGBT Seniors: Colors Straight Up (2000). - Aging In Equity: Key Issues for LGBT Elders. Notes from the NYRAG Briefing (Word Download) - Gay and Gray in New York City (Film).

The Aging LGBT Community. Presented by: LGBT Boomers and Beyond Coalition For Arizona State University Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center (SIRC) (2012, PPT Download). Presenters: Scott Hawthornthwaite – Area Agency on Aging, Region 1. Adero Allison, PhD – Transitioning Adults Plus. Chris Boutwell – One Voice Community Center. David Coon, PhD – Arizona State University. David – Prime Timers. Brett Petersen – Duet. Billie Myres – Hospice of the Valley. Moderator: Joan Zecherle – Hospice of the Valley  Presentations: LGBT Boomers and Beyond Coalition – The Beginnings. - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Issues and Family Caregiving. - LGBT Boomers and Beyond Coalition: Community Programs and Resources in Maricopa County.

SAGE USA Conferences: - Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) is the country's largest and oldest organization dedicated to improving the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) older adults. Our mission is to lead in addressing issues related to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) aging. - Call for Proposals – SAGE Fourth National Conference on LGBT Aging (2008). - It’s About Time: LGBT Aging in a Changing World: SAGE Fourth National Conference on LGBT Aging Conference [2008] Report: Policy Recommendations (2010). PDF Download. The SAGE Conference represented a rare opportunity for the growing LGBT aging field to share expertise, data, and best practices. To make the most of the wealth of information gathered at this Conference, SAGE has prepared these Policy Recommendations and will issue additional “white papers” at intervals in the period prior to SAGE’s next Conference in 2010. The “white papers” will provide more information on how policy issues actually affect older LGBT adults’ lives, and discuss more fully what we do – and don’t – know about LGBT aging. The four key LGBT aging policy areas addressed in this Report are: • Discrimination and barriers to accessing services. • Financial and health security. • Caregiving. • Civic engagement. For each of the four policy areas, this Report provides a brief introduction, a review of some of the primary relevant findings and discussions from the 2008 “It’s About Time” Conference, and SAGE’s recommended policy changes.

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force: - Aging. - NGLTF, HRC & P-FLAG Help Lay Groundwork for the Elderly (1998).


To "The SEARCH Section" For The Best Search Engines & Information Directories, The Searchable Sites to Locate Papers & Abstracts... and The Sites - Some Searchable - Where "Free Papers" Are Available!  


GLBT People Of Color

SAGE USA (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, 2013). Health Equity and LGBT Elders of Color: Recommendations for Policy and Practice. PDF Download. LGBT elders of color are an important part of this demographic shift—yet the available research shows that they often face heightened health disparities and are largely rendered invisible in public policy discussions on aging.Many LGBT elders of color enter retirement age without the supports necessary for healthy aging. And a lifetime of discrimination has adversely affected LGBT elders of color, based on multiple aspects of their identities, including racial inequality, anti-LGBT discrimination, challenges based on immigration status, and more. - Health disparities in older people of color (2013): A report released last week from SAGE (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders) explored the health disparities faced by LGBT older people of color and offers policy solutions in 10 areas to address the findings, the Windy City Times, a gay Chicago paper, reported. The study, dubbed “Health Equity and LGBT Elders of Color,” found that “LGBT elders of color are historically marginalized on multiple fronts and their needs are often under-addressed in the mainstream aging field and in the popular LGBT rights movement,” according to Michael Adams, SAGE’s executive director.

Health Equity for Older LGBT People of Color (2013): Both Helena and Ty are LGBT and people of color. And both of them combat the health disparities and socioeconomic challenges associated with aging as people who are marginalized on multiple fronts -- a reality rarely discussed in the mainstream aging field or in the popular LGBT rights movement. The virtual silence on this subject lives out in their personal and political lifespans. A new policy report from SAGE (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders) seeks to challenge that silence. "Health Equity and LGBT Elders of Color" explores 10 policy areas where health and wellness can be improved for older LGBT people of color (a population that encompasses multiple groups that are diverse across race, ethnicity, culture, language of origin and more). The report examines policy topics such as federal funding gaps, the ways in which health reform implementation can reach marginalized people, LGBT-specific barriers within programs such as Social Security and much more.

SAGE (2013). LGBT Health, Racial Disparities and Aging - By The Numbers. PDF Download. Over the next several decades, our country will grow increasingly older and more diverse. LGB T elders of locor are an important part of theis demographic shift - yet the available research, highlighted in the report health Equity and LGBT Elders of Color, shows that they often face economic insecurity and heightened health disparities while remaining largely invisible in public policy discussion on aging... In order to improve the health and wellness of LGB T elders, policy changes are needed to explicitly address the racisl, economic and gender disparities facing LGBT elders of color.

National POC [People of Color] LGBT Convening: Day One Highlight (2011): Today was the first day of sessions for the National Convening of POC LGBT Aging Professionals, as someone said, “is a very historic day, an idea that was a dream, today was realized.”  From around 8am guests and panelists began arriving at Brickfield Convention Center, AARP’s hi-tech conference facility in the heart of the nation’s capital.  Carmelita Tursi, Senior Diversity Advisor HR Group at AARP, provided the opening greetings, while Clarence Fluker, Program Manager, Office of GLBT Affairs, District of Columbia Mayor’s Office, delivered a warm welcome to Washington, D.C.  In the absence of Cathy Greenley, Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services at AOA, Edwin L. Walker, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Programs Dept. of Health and Human Services, AOA delivered a message form the Assistant Secretary.

Johnson Jr, Michael (2013). Race, Aging and Gay In/Visibilityon U.S. Television. PDF Download. In: Television and the Self: Knowledge, Identity, and Media Representation edited by Kathleen M. Ryan, Deborah A. Macey (Google Books). I have always been particularly troubled by the fact that gay men often appear on television in the midst of their youth or perpetually in their early adulthood.The abject invisibility of gay men as “elders/seniors” or, the pathologizinghyper-visibility of “older” gay men as stereotypical sexual predators has permeated the televisual landscape. 1 While there is extensive scholarship on theissue of aging, ageism and its sociocultural importance for gay men in asubculture that valorizes youth, little research has been conducted into how this phenomenon is perpetuated and perhaps instigated through the ubiquity of television. Indeed, even less research has successfully explored the intersectionsof age for gay men of color in terms of televisual invisibility.The purpose of this chapter is to critically interrogate these issues todetermine what the contemporary televisual landscape reveals and what, if anyopportunities presage the appearance of characters on networks for queer men of color in the later stages of adulthood. Methodologically, I use textual analysiscombined with cultivation theory as a basis for establishing truth claims thatconstruct a theoretical framework through which my analysis is conducted. Inthis chapter, I argue that despite the increased visibility of gay men oncontemporary telenarratives (both on broadcast and cable networks) people of color remain stubbornly less visible and even within those examples of whitegay men who dominate the airwaves, few if any depict men over the age of 40or gay elders over the age of retirement. This invisibility operates a heuristic that pedagogically educates viewers to interpellate gay men as perpetually young or as young adults, thereby rendering middle aged or elders as alternativelyinconsequential or dangerous through their conspicuous absence. 

Insight Center for Community Economic Development (2012). Securing Our Future: Advancing Economic Security for Diverse Elders. PDF Download. Download Page. A report of the Diverse Elders Coalition in partnership with the Insight Center for Community Economic Development. This report describes the issues facing elders of color and LGBT elders, who together will represent a majority of older adults in the United States by 2050. The report also offers policy recommendations in several areas key to the well-being of older people, including Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, health care reform, and more...  Seven organizations formed the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) in 2010 in an effort to improve the quality of life for this country’s racially and ethnically diverse older adults and LGBT elders. "is unique and one-of-a-kind coalition promotes policy changes and programmatic solutions that respond to the needs of a signifcantly growing but ofen ignored population. DEC consists of: Asociación Nacional Pro Personas Mayores (ANPPM), The National Asian Paci#c Center on Aging (NAPCA), The National Caucus and Center on Black Aged, Inc., (NCBA). The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), The National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA), Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), and the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC). - Diverse Elders Coalition Releases Report and News Blog on the Policy Barriers Facing Elders of Color and LGBT Elders (2012): Despite their growing presence in the US, elders of color and LGBT elders  face significant disparities in health and health care access, economic security, housing, employment and more. Many encounter aging providers who lack the cultural and linguistic competence to address their unique needs, and many others face outright discrimination and neglect from our aging and health care system. More broadly, programs aimed at older people rarely explicitly serve elders of color and LGBT elders. To address these issues, some key recommendations from the report include:... [Note: Nothing is mentioned about how providing services to the elderly LGBT people who are also African Americans, Asian Americans, Pacifc Islanders, Hispanic, American Indians (AIs), or Alaska Natives (ANs) might be addressed. That is, there have been major racism issues in predominatly white North American gay/lesbian communities, and not only in North America... that have also been ongoing.]

Adelman M, Gurevitch J (2003+, 2010). Groundbreaking Study on LGBT Aging: Need for Housing, Services and Support. PDF Download. LGBT seniors have become increasingly visible in communities across the country, but only a handful of studies have documented their needs. Yet, having an accurate, informed understanding of their social, financial, retirement, health-related and support needs is essential to develop urgently needed housing and community services. In 2003 openhouse completed a major study of more than 1300 LGBT adults in the Bay Area – the largest and most racially inclusive study of LGBT aging in the country. Although we reached out to transgender and bisexual adults, the study predominantly reflects the experiences of lesbians and gay men who are more visible among older adults. More than half (55%) of participants were age 50 or older, 25% were people of color and nearly half were women... Among lesbians and gay men, aged 50-59, nearly half (45%) earn less than $39,000 per year while 20% earn less than $26,000. Among those aged 60 and older, 62% earned less than $39,000. People of color were more disadvantaged financially, with 1 in 4 earning less than $39,000 and only about 1 in 4 earning more than $60,000 per year... By contrast, our study found that almost three-fourths of gay men over age 65 and nearly half of same-aged lesbians were not partnered. Lesbians of color were even less likely to have a partner than white  lesbians...

City of Oakland Awards $32,073 to Lavender Seniors (2003):  The City of Oakland has awarded a one-year $32,073 grant to Lavender Seniors of the East Bay for outreach to Oakland's racial and ethnic minority LGBT seniors. "This grant from the City of Oakland will help not only Lavender Seniors but also city officials and others in the community to better connect with the most under-served and frequently over-looked LGBT senior populations," said Jeff Vessels, MSSW, Director of Lavender Seniors. The goal of the grant is to increase access to effective and culturally competent senior services and facilities for Oakland's LGBT seniors, especially those in communities of color.

Caring for caregivers: The issues—and interventions—are different for racial and ethnic-minority caregivers (2009). Note: Important differences but nothing mentioned about same-sex individuals or couples. Related writings / studies are needed.

"Mature Mens Group - Lgbt Elders Of Color" Program (GRIOT Circle -A Safe Space for LGBT Elders of Color.  Brooklyn, NY, USA.): A support group therapy for gay senior men to share their thoughts, fears, socialize and build new friendships... To create a non-threatening environment that promotes mental health and possibly prevent elderly depression for senior gay men. - GRIOT (Gay Reunion In Our Time) Circle Website.

"HIV/AIDS 50+ Support Group - LGBT Elders Of Color" Program (GRIOT Circle -A Safe Space for LGBT Elders of Color. Brooklyn, NY, USA.): LGBT seniors of color with HIV/AIDS discuss their unique issues with a support group therapy in a safe space... Live in isolation or are afraid to tell family and friends that they have HIV/AIDS are able to access a supportive place to discuss their illness... Watch Video on the Organization "Griot Circle"...  GRIOT Circle Inc. WebSite.

Jimenez AD (2003). Triple jeopardy: targeting older men of color who have sex with men. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 33 Suppl 2:S222-S225. Abstract. This article presents selected findings from a needs assessment conducted for a community-based organization in Chicago that targeted black and Latino men 50 years and older who have sex with men (MSM). A convenience sample of 110 self-identified minority MSM was recruited through agency sources and administered a 73-question survey. Most men surveyed (>90%) reported sex with other men, with 20% reporting unprotected receptive anal sex and most reporting drug use in conjunction with sex. The data showed varying sexual self-identification, with 45% identified as either bisexual or mostly or completely straight and a substantial proportion (36%) reporting sexual activity with women. A large percentage disclosed being relatively secretive about their same-sex behaviors to others, however, and ranked homosexual-related and HIV-related stigma high. Most men (74%) perceived themselves to be at minimal risk for contracting HIV infection, and 50% ranked their level of worry about contracting HIV infection as low. Noteworthy among the findings were the linked variables of age and race, revealing that older minority MSM may be at elevated risk because they are sexually active, often have multiple partners, and include drug use as part of their sexual episodes. Race and age also may play an important role in determining patterns of sexual identity formation, whether older minority MSM disclose same-sex practices to others or perceive gay-related or HIV-related stigmatization. Implications of these data for interventions targeting older minority MSM suggest the need for culturally sensitive and specific dissemination of basic HIV prevention information and promotion of HIV testing.


Lesbian  / Bisexual Women

Classic Dykes (1998 to 2012). - Golden Threads - works to end isolation and loneliness among midlife and elderly lesbians: Golden Threads is a contact publication for lesbians, published 4 times a year in March, June, September and December.  It is a world wide network, founded in 1985 by Christine Burton. - Coalition of Older Lesbians of Los Angeles (To 2008). - Enduring Like a Redwood at 60 (2000): It's strange to turn 60 in a community, and a country, where "old age" is dreaded by so many. On June 15, that benchmark birthday came to me. It seems only yesterday that I decided to stop plucking out those first silver hairs with tweezers. Now, all the hairs are silver. - Elder LGBT Resource List: The Elder Lesbian Initiative and the Seattle LGBT Community Center were two results of organizing meetings launched in 1997 by Queen City Community Development (QCCD), in part to address the needs of elder members of the local sexual minority population. The Elder Lesbian Initiative quickly acquired the sobriquet "RedDotGirls."... One of its first efforts was to produce a list of lesbian-friendly resources and social services, which was first published in the Lesbian Resource Center News in 1997; an updated version in 1999.

Elder co-housing project is aimed at gay women (2007): When they were younger, Nancy Nystrom and her friends joked about one day living together in a home for old lesbians. But as they aged, the joke grew less funny. Lesbian women and gay men often go back in the closet in later life, fearing discrimination and even abuse if they need care.Why wasn't there a special place for them? Soon there will be, on a quiet, wooded hillside in Bremerton. - Lesbians Welcome: Kitsap Fits Bill for a New Kind of Elderly Housing (2007): It seems perfectly obvious to Nancy Nystron and Teresa Jones: Kitsap County is the perfect place to conduct a social science experiment. The social work Ph.D.s and University of Washington lecturers have been life partners for about 15 years. They're in the process of building KitsHarbour, a independent living cooperative overlooking Port Orchard Bay in the Illahee area near Bremerton for women aged 55 to 78. The scenic home is open to all women, but lesbians are especially welcome.

Lesbian, bisexual and transgender female elders: A fact sheet from the Task Force (2007): In observation of Women’s History Month: Lesbian, bisexual and transgender female elders: women’s history month 2007 fact sheet.

Local filmmaker showcases stories of aging black lesbians (2011): Philadelphia filmmaker Tiona McClodden’s new project gives a voice to a group of women whose stories — each a unique tale of struggle and triumph — together shed unprecedented light on the black lesbian community’s historical influence. “The Untitled Black Lesbian Elder Project” is a joint work by McClodden and Lisa Moore, a publisher who first began collecting stories from this community for a master’s thesis in the late 1990s. Moore approached McClodden in 2008 = after the release of the filmmaker’s award-winning “black.womyn. conversations with lesbians of African descent.” - to propose building on Moore’s original work to create a feature-length documentary. Read more: PGN-The Philadelphia Gay News. Phila gay news. philly news - Local filmmaker showcases stories of aging black lesbians. - The "Untitled Black Lesbian Elder Project" is underway (2011): This gem of lesbian history and documentary filmmaking is the brainchild of filmmaker Tiona McClodden and publisher Lisa C. Moore. If a publisher sounds like an odd accomplice for a filmmaker, have no fear: Moore is head of the fierce Red Bone Press, which publishes books by black gay and lesbian authors. -  Untitled Black Lesbian Elder Project (2014).

Ruth Ellis Senior Project (2002): This project was named after Ruth Ellis the oldest "out" African American lesbian, who was Born July 23, 1899,  in Springfield, Illinois, and died in 2000... Black Lesbian ElderSpeak Project: On April 11-13th, 2003 in Los Angeles, California at the ZUNA Institute’s National Black Lesbian Conference, health data was collected from both older and younger lesbians who attending the conference ninety percent of whom were from California...  Most respondents (n=70, 55%) were under the age of 55 while 45% (n=57) were 55 or older... Conclusions: Significant differences exist in the health issues of older and younger African American lesbians. In addition the rates of various health issues suggest that health disparities probably exist in African American lesbians and that health care workers must be conscious of them. The report and the video will also be made available to mainstream senior services provider who are seeking to obtain more information on this population. The Black Lesbian Elder Speak Project (2003): Voices missing from the last Zuna Conferences were those who are over 55 years of age. This will occur at the ZUNA Institute National Conference which is scheduled for April 11-13th, 2003 in Los Angeles, California... It is our hopes that by bring these women from all across California and other parts of the United States together it will diminish the sense of isolation and start to build a national older black lesbian community network.

Ruth Ellis (July 23,1899- October 5, 2000): Matriarch of African American lesbians has passed on at the age of 101, leaving a legacy of optimism, modesty and humor. Openly lesbian since 1915, Ruth Ellis made a declaration of her love of women and of life - and lived these as truths until her last days... - In Memoriam: Betty Berzon & Anyda Marchant (2006): Betty Berzon, 1928-2006. Pioneer gay rights activist, psychotherapist, and writer, Betty Berzon died peacefully in her sleep on January 24, 2006. She was 78... Anyda Marchant, 1911-2006. Anyda Marchant, 94, a retired attorney, novelist and publisher died January 11, at home in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware.

100 years young: Ruth Ellis brings the celebration of a century to D.C. Black Pride. - Talking Black History (1999): 100 year old `Miss Ruth' lived through it. - On being a lesbian of color (2000): I am 77 years old and I live in the State of Arizona.   When I was born in Natchez, Mississippi, I was categorized as a "colored female."  When I was one month old I was taken to Louisiana by a couple in their mid-fifties.  I stayed there until I was sixteen.  I was a multiracial person brought up in Southern Jim Crow states.  We had white water, white toilets, white schools, white churches and white side-walks.  Disobey the rules and anything could happen.  Anything!... Sadly, racism is alive and well in our own lesbian community.  Although the lesbian community is itself a minority group, it has all the same baggage that the larger society has, and this includes racism.  If you look around and see few women of color at our gatherings, the reason is rather simple:  at our age women of color are not willing to subject themselves to the slights and innuendoes which let us know we are not accepted.  We will not be present in numbers until we have more assurance that we are welcome.  I have tremendous respect for the women who are able to rid themselves of the feeling of superiority based solely on their whiteness, and too often find myself impatient with the ones who don't. If we don't resolve some of the issues of racism that keep us apart we will not succeed in our mission:  the eradication of ageism and homophobia.  Black people, in particular, are very into their churches which are almost totally segregated.  Black lesbians are in touch with their family members and their churches on many levels.  If we had more unity, the religious right would not have the success they do in going to black churches and making lesbians seem like monsters. Women of color have some very special assets to give to our common struggle.  In our age group we've been struggling all our lives.  We know how to go over, around and under many kinds of obstacles in order to survive. The struggle against ageism (and racism and all the "isms") will be with us for a long time.  We must not let our guard down.  Freedom from ageism won't happen overnight.  If we unify, persevere, and remain vigilant, we'll see some changes even in our life time. 

Old Lesbians Organizing for Change (OLOC, Vermont): Why We Call Ourselves Old: "Society calls us old behind our backs while calling us "older" to our faces. "Old" has become a term of insult and shame. To be "old" means to be ignored and scorned, to be made invisible and expendable. We refute the lie that it is shameful to be an "old" woman. We name ourselves "old lesbians" because we no longer will accommodate to language that implies in any way that "old" means inferior. We call ourselves OLD with pride. In doing so, we challenge the stereotypes directly. Thus, we empower and change ourselves, each other, and the world." - Rebels & Survivors: The life stories from four of our lesbian "ancestors" (2001): And yet, women born in the early part of the 20th century managed to somehow get educations, support themselves, and live their lives intimately connected to other women. Gay or lesbian organizations or communities were basically nonexistent in the U.S. until after about 1948. But, that didn’t stop these women. Through the efforts of Arden Eversmeyer and Old Lesbians Organizing for Change (O.L.O.C.), a number of oral histories have been taken of these women who are now in their 70s and 80s. Arden conducted these interviews in the last few years, and several of the subjects are no longer living. She started in Houston with her oral history project, and is now touring the country gathering stories of our lesbian forebears. - Lesbian.com: Lesbian Elders and Crones (2003).

The Narratives of Old Lesbians: Maintaining the Integrity (1997): Macdonald and Rich (1991) expressed concern over the "patronizing tones" used to describe old lesbians and gay men in professional writings. These authors argued that images of childlike simplicity; neurotic fears; physical, cognitive, and sensory loss; wrinkles; and sagging bodies are inaccurately portrayed as risks of old age rather than risks of life. Hill-Collins (1990) reported that research on disempowered and marginalized groups is only given attention when the findings and ideas are framed "in the language that is familiar to and comfortable for a dominant group. This requirement often changes the meaning of ideas and works to elevate the ideas of dominant groups." Personal narratives by old lesbians and gay men can present a more accurate description of their authentic experiences and maintain the integrity of their lives. - Relying on Themselves and Their Communities: Healthcare Experiences of Older Rural Lesbians (1998): Previous research on lesbian healthcare has drawn primarily from samples of young lesbians living in metropolitan areas. With grant support from the Lesbian Health Fund, we have conducted an exploratory study that begins to fill this gap in the literature by examining the healthcare experiences of older rural lesbians. Our research focused on past experiences in obtaining healthcare and on future visions for safe, inviting and accessible healthcare, mental health care and support services. Our sample consisted of 21 informants...

Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon (Wikipedia): Dorothy Louise Taliaferro "Del" Martin (May 5, 1921 – August 27, 2008) and Phyllis Ann Lyon (born November 10, 1924) were an American lesbian couple known as feminist and gay-rights activists. They were a couple until Del Martin's death on August 27, 2008. - Guide to the Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin Papers, 1924-2000. -  No Secret Anymore: The Times of Del Martin & Phyllis Lyon (Documentary, 2003). - No Secret Anymore:  Phyllis Lyon & Del Martin (2003): The celebration of their 50th anniversary and the premiere of the documentary No Secret Anymore. - A century of lesbian pride (2000): At the same time, the oldest homosexuals - those in their 80s and beyond - have remained largely invisible... Two new hour-long documentaries begin to redress this situation by profiling a pair of outspoken older lesbians. Golden Threads, directed by Lucy Winer and Karen Eaton, introduces viewers to Christine Burton, who at the age of 80 founded a national correspondence club for older lesbians; Burton died last year at age 94. Living With Pride: Ruth Ellis @ 100, directed by Yvonne Welbon, offers a portrait of a centenarian whose home was a gathering place for African American homosexuals in Detroit from the 1940s into the 1960s

Merrill, Tiffany Jo (2010). Aging and Lesbian Relationships: Strengths, Challenges, and Late-Life Concerns. Master's Dissertation, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Utah. PDF Download. Download Page. Empirical efforts have slowly begun to explore the ways in which lesbian-identified women experience the many facets of aging. However, most research either conflates the experiences of lesbians and gay men or fails to distinguish between the experiences of single and coupled lesbians. This study utilized a qualitative grounded theory design from a feminist constructivist perspective to develop a conceptual model of the role of aging in lesbian relationships, including the impact of aging on lesbian relationships and the ways in which couples lesbians think about, talk about, and plan for late-life experiences. Eight participant couples in which 1 partner was at least 60 years of age described their experiences around getting older in interviews. Six themes emerged: planning, lesbian community, negotiations and concerns around caregiving, relationships and the impact of aging, resiliency and lesbian identity, and gratitude. Overall, participant couples expressed an enriched and strengthened relationship with one another as a result of growing older. The six themes were then integrated into a conceptual model that attempts to understand the themes in relation to one another and to the larger context of participants' lives.

Traies, Jane Elizabeth (2009). Now you see me: the invisibility of older lesbians. Master's Dissertation, University of Birmingham. PDF Download. Download Page.  Monika Kehoe (1986) described older lesbians as "a triply invisible minority.‟ In this dissertation I seek to establish whether that description is still valid and, if so, why. I go on to ask, if older lesbians are culturally / discursively invisible, what are the circumstances which can enable them to be seen? and what could be gained from that visibility? By analysing a range of cultural texts I demonstrate that, although the visibility of women and of lesbians has steadily increased in recent years, older lesbians are still rarely represented in popular culture or the media. Academic research reflects this blindness: gerontology largely ignores non-heterosexual subjects, while lesbian and gay studies marginalise the old. I then use a case study of the documentary film Women Like Us (Neild and Pearson, 1990) to investigate the social and political forces which enable older lesbians to become visible, and to demonstrate the cultural importance of these representations. I conclude that older lesbians in Britain today are rendered invisible by a combination of sexism, ageism and hetero-sexism; that lack of media representation has been a decisive factor in maintaining their invisibility; and that there is a need for further research in this neglected area.

Rumpf, Andrea Taylor (1999). Support Networks and Life Satisfaction Among Older Women: A Comparison of Lesbian and Heterosexual Women. Discourse of Sociological Practice, 1(2): 8-. Reference. Full Text. The following is an exploratory study that will address the use of support networks and levels of life satisfaction among older lesbians as opposed to older heterosexual women. The findings of this research have been based upon a literature review and interviews with four older women (ages 63-82, two lesbian, two heterosexual).  None of the respondents were involved in romantic relationships at the time.

Being Out at 65: Gay retirement communities are catching on fast (2003): Nature has it fixed so that women often outlive their husbands. So it's no surprise to find the gender ratio skewed to female at most retirement communities. Stroll the grounds at one such vibrant development near Fort Myers, Fla., and you're apt never to even see a man. But that doesn't stop its 300 female residents from enjoying busy social lives, competing in tennis by day and partying it up at dances in the evenings. That's because these women are part of the first predominantly lesbian retirement community of its size in the U.S. "I still have to pinch myself that this isn't a dream," says Mary Jeanne Walsh, a retired Chase Manhattan bank vice president who moved into her attractive two-bedroom home three years ago. "When I was younger, I never would have imagined a place like this existed."

History of Lavender Seniors of the East Bay (2007): Lavender Seniors of the East Bay was founded in November 1994 by about 20 women and men. Some who attended that first meeting were long-time activists who were eager to organize as East Bay lesbian and gay seniors. We wanted to make our presence and needs better known, not only within the lesbian and gay community but also in mainstream society. The 1994 Alameda County Senior Needs Assessment had identified older lesbians and gays as an under-served special needs population, so we had reason to believe that the time was right for a grass-roots senior-run group to advocate for our needs to the general public and to government agencies and mainstream providers of senior services. - The Untitled Black Lesbian Elder Project (2013, Video, Kentucky).

From OlderDykes.org (Australia): Newsletters: 2008 to 2013+). - Australian Lesbian Links. - Listing of Recent Articles (To 2008). - Archives (To 2008). - Hey! Look at Me, I'm Grieving! (2002): "There are books on practically every aspect of grief except those experienced by women grieving for women. Women whose partners have died. When this happened to me I searched for something - anything - what to do, what not to do, how to cope under the weight of this sledge hammer that had flattened me to pulp. I found nothing." - Thousands of Elderly Lesbians in Poverty: "To conclude, there are lesbians who will experience the delights of a well funded retirement, but more than half of our lesbian population will experience some degree of poverty."

Transgender / Transsexual

National Center for Transgender Equality (A social justice organization dedicated to advancing the equality of transgender people through advocacy, collaboration and empowerment): Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults (2011): According to the national Caring and Aging with Pride survey, transgender older adults are a “critically underserved population[ ] at heightened risk of physical and mental health disparities often combined with less social and community support.” The same survey found that 40% of transgender older adults have been denied health care or received inferior care due to bias. A recent survey of 320 area agencies and state units on aging found that more than one in four reported that transgender older adults would either not be welcomed by local service providers or the agency was unsure of how welcome they would be. Other research has revealed discrimination and abuse of transgender residents in long-term care facilities. Some initial steps have been taken by the Obama Administration to address these issues. - Psychological and social adjustment in older transsexual people (2012).

Age UK: Factsheet: Transgender Issues in Later Life: This factsheet provides information on issues in later life for transvestite, transgender and transsexual people, as well as people who wish to offer them support. It covers a range of social, care, legal and financial issues and includes some general information and a glossary, plus details of where to go for further information. Age UK is indebted to the FTM Network for researching and writing the greater part of the original information for this factsheet. The information given in this factsheet is applicable in England. Different rules may apply in Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland.

Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender senior citizens come out late, start second lifetime (2010): On his 75th birthday, Bill Farthing decided to be reborn. In the six years since he'd buried his wife of 45 years, he'd felt as he did long before: Lonesome, different, outcast. He wondered if he was going crazy; he contemplated suicide. Looking back, the clues leading to this day had been scattered throughout his life, but only made sense just now. So Farthing dressed in the most basic of blue wool skirt suits he could find on the Internet, with a white blouse and low-heeled, open-toed white shoes, and went shopping. Arms loaded with skirts and blouses from the clearance rack, Farthing approached the checkout. "Did you find everything you wanted, ma'am?" the cashier asked. Farthing looked over his shoulder, then realized she was talking to him. He had pulled it off. He had become a she.

Opening Doors: Working With Older Lesbians and Gay Men - 2001 - (London: Age Concern England): What these facts mean for transgender persons is that the option of being completely “stealth” shrinks as one ages. Although some post-operative MTFs look completely female even unclothed, that is not the case for FTMs, MTFs who could not afford or didn’t want genital surgery, crossdressers, and other transgender and intersex individuals whose secondary sex characteristics and/or genitals don’t “match” their dressed appearance. The fact that, unlike their non-transgender lesbian and gay male peers, most trans elders can NOT be closeted in health care settings, makes it even more imperative that efforts to educate aging and health services personnel and institutions about sexual orientation and gender identity diversity include detailed information about trans elders. Unfortunately, that transgender inclusion is in name only far too often. A good example of this “disappearing T” phenomena is a resource packet for aging services providers on LGBT issues created by Age Concern England, “Opening Doors: Working with Older Lesbians and Gay Men.” Despite its title, the Introduction states that the packet uses the term “lesbian and gay older people to encapsulate lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older people.” (p. 2, emphasis added) Unfortunately, that is the only time transgender people are mentioned.

Physical and Mental Health of Transgender Older Adults: An At-Risk and Underserved Population (2013): Utilizing data from a cross-sectional survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults aged 50 and older (N = 2,560), we assessed direct and indirect effects of gender identity on 4 health outcomes (physical health, disability, depressive symptomatology, and perceived stress) based on a resilience conceptual framework... Transgender older adults were at significantly higher risk of poor physical health, disability, depressive symptomatology, and perceived stress compared with nontransgender participants. We found significant indirect effects of gender identity on the health outcomes via fear of accessing health services, lack of physical activity, internalized stigma, victimization, and lack of social support; other mediators included obesity for physical health and disability, identity concealment for perceived stress, and community belonging for depressive symptomatology and perceived stress. Further analyses revealed that risk factors (victimization and stigma) explained the highest proportion of the total effect of gender identity on health outcomes... The study identifies important modifiable factors (stigma, victimization, health-related behaviors, and social support) associated with health among transgender older adults. Reducing stigma and victimization and including gender identity in nondiscrimination and hate crime statutes are important steps to reduce health risks. Attention to bolstering individual and community-level social support must be considered when developing tailored interventions to address transgender older adults' distinct health and aging needs.

Fredriksen-Goldsen KI, et al. (2013). Physical and Mental Health of Transgender Older Adults: An At-Risk and Underserved Population. The Gerontologist, Online First. PDF Download.   Utilizing data from a cross-sectional survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults aged 50 and older (N = 2,560), we assessed direct and indirect effects of gender identity on 4 health outcomes (physical health, disability, depressive symptomatology, and perceived stress) based on a resilience conceptual framework. ... Transgender older adults were at significantly higher risk of poor physical health, disability, depressive symptomatology, and perceived stress compared with nontransgender participants. We found significant indirect effects of gender identity on the health outcomes via fear of accessing health services, lack of physical activity, internalized stigma, victimization, and lack of social support; other mediators included obesity for physical health and disability, identity concealment for perceived stress, and community belonging for depressive symptomatology and perceived stress. Further analyses revealed that risk factors (victimization and stigma) explained the highest proportion of the total effect of gender identity on health outcomes.

Persson Diane I (2009). Unique Challenges of Transgender Aging: Implications From the Literature. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 52: 633–646. PDF Download. Transgender elders are both underserved and understudied. Neither the etiology nor prevalence of transgender is well understood. Because sex, gender, and sexuality are at the very core of individual identity, it is difficult to dislodge one’s ideas and feelings about them. Unlike biological sex and sexual orientation, gender has several aspects: gender identity, gender expression, and gender classification. A discussion of the terminology of transgender is presented, and the issues facing aging transgender individuals are identified. Although the challenges of adequate healthcare, social support, and legal obstacles are faced by many elderly individuals, the way they are presented and managed are unique to this often invisible group.

Auldridge A, Tamar-Mattis Kennedy S, Ames E, Tobin HJ (2012). Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults; Recommendations for Policy and Practice. New York, NY: Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) and National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE). PDF Download. PDF Download. Read Online. - Improving The Lives of Transgender Older Adults (2012): I just got off the podium from our press conference here at the Philly Trans Health Conference where NCTE and Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) released a new resource for transgender older adults. Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults: Recommendations for Policy and Practice includes over 60 concrete steps to immediately help trans older Americans... This resource was produced as part of the Transgender Aging Advocacy Initiative. It is only a small part of the work needed to make sure transgender people are treated fairly by aging service providers. And we’ll continue to work to ensure that older transgender Americans have access to necessary services and are treated with respect. - Transgender seniors not getting proper care (2012): A recent new set of recommendations released by SAGE (Services and Advocacy for LGBT Elders) and the National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE) sheds light on systematic issues facing the growing population of aging transgender Americans. The report—entitled "Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults; Recommendations for Policy and Practice"—focuses on how insurance companies, Medicare and cultural stigma prevent aging transgender people from receiving proper care. - The realities of transgender aging (2012): A new resource provides insights into the issues aging trans men and women face. - Shameful lack of services for Trans seniors (2012).

The Challenge of Finding a Home: A Cross-Dressing Elder Veterans's Story (2004): The situation lasted for a while, until Jane realized that it was not stable and would eventually end; her roomate had her own life to deal with and could not be a caregiver to an older person. Jane then went to a commercial retirment home in a delightful area, but she still complained. I was able to visit her at this location once. Although it was very clean and charming, Jane felt stifled. Jane began to have to have some health problems and ultimately ended up in another verterans home. By then, she was approaching 80 and was determined to dress. She began doing so during the day - at first, onlin in her room. The nurses smiled and seemed to go along with it, but the orderlies were apparently snide and cold. Jane wanted to go to lunch and social activities - bingo, movie parties - in her feminine clothes. The situation blew up, and the nursing home administration prohibited her from cross-dressing publicly. - What We Don't Know: The Unaddressed Health Concerns of the Transgendered (2006): The LGBT Health Issues Companion Document, part of the Federal Government’s HEALTHY PEOPLE 2010 initiative, issued in the fall of 2000, dramatically underscores this shortcoming. Though not enough, there is some data on many of the important lesbian and gay health concerns. But what the document brings to light most is the lack of information about the bi-sexual, and the dearth of data on the ‘T’ community. Reading through it, one soon realizes that what we don’t know far exceeds what we do know (and what we need to know) about the health needs of the transgendered.

Thomas, Charlotte (2013). How well does bereavement counselling in the UK provide for the particular needs of trans people. UK: The Counselling Directory. Full Text. Several developments over the last 10 years have brought profound changes for trans people in the UK and for their families and friends. Whilst these changes are welcome, there is still much to be done and not all of society, including the therapeutic community, will have caught up with these changes. The trans community has faced, and is still facing, transphobia, discrimination, prejudice and social exclusion. The trans community is part of an increasingly aging population in the UK. This paper seeks to review the literature that identifies the particular needs of trans people and their friends and families as they cope with the challenges of aging including the death of a loved one or of friends and family. The paper explores how social exclusion, estrangement and isolation may make contact with bereavement counselling services all the more important for this community. However, a history of rejection and prejudice may create a barrier as potential trans clients remain defensive and wary of these services. Although there is little research on the subject, it is likely that the barriers to counselling will not be overcome unless therapists take action to reach out to this community and reassure them with their trans-affirmative practices.

Whittle S, Turner L (2007). Bereavement: A guide for Transsexual, Transgender people and their loved ones. England: Department of Health. PDF Download. This booklet has been produced to assist bereaved trans people or friends, or the family of a trans person who has died. It will also inform professionals such as coroners, pathologists, mortuary staff and undertakers to understand the particular needs of trans people in the circumstances of death. There have been recent legal changes regarding gender recognition for legal purposes as well as obligations to protect the privacy of trans people. These impact on the obtaining and security of details of trans people in the circumstances where either they have died, or when dealing with the death of a family member. Trans people have particular needs regarding privacy. Some for example, live only part-time in their preferred gender as they fear that transitioning to their acquired gender may put their career at risk. Some who transitioned many years ago ‘pass’ in public life as non-trans people and some living permanently in their new gender are clearly trans people to those they interact with. Trans people are aware of the prejudices which exist – and the popularity of ‘sex swap’ stories in the media and keep a low profile in their local communities. For many, the death of a trans person brings the additional anxiety of dealing with the appropriate authorities and maintaining the status of the deceased as trans, private. There will also be particular concerns for the relatives or partner of a deceased trans person regarding the treatment of the body by funeral directors and mortuary staff, particularly if the trans person has not undergone genital surgery. We hope that this booklet will help bereaved people cope with the difficulties of the event of a death and clarify the legal situation for all.
 
Minter S (2002 / 2003). Legal and Public Policy Issues for Transgender Elders. National Center for Lesbian Rights. PDF Download. Alejandro is a 72 year old female-to-male transsexual (FTM). After suffering a number of serious health problems, Alejandro no longer felt safe living alone and moved into an assisted living facility. Within a few days of his arrival, some of the other residents discovered that Alejandro was transsexual and demanded that he be asked to leave. A month later, the facility informed him that his presence was upsetting to the other residents and that his tenancy was being terminated. Alejandro contacted several public agencies for assistance, but was told that discrimination against transgender people is not prohibited under federal, state or local law...  Conclusion: Transgender elders are vulnerable to multiple forms of discrimination and generally have few legal, medical, or social resources. There is a great need for programs and initiatives specifically targeted at this group.

Old Hags & Sagging Bags: A Forum for Ancient Cross-Dressers (1996 to 1999): "Old Hags & Sagging Bags" is a newsletter for the aging crossdresser and other older transgendered persons. The newsletter complies with the spirit and letter of Renaissance so while the emphasis seems to be on crossdressing, all transgender issues are featured. The newsletter was originally, and still is, a printed publication. To retain the feel of printing we have created it in black and white, the only difference being to display in a single column instead of the two column format of the printed version. Reprints and copying of all material, unless otherwise copyrighted, is permitted as long as reference is made to "Old Hags and Sagging Bags" newsletter.

Transgender Aging Network (To 2006). - Transgender Aging Network. - Lesbian, Gay Male, Bisexual and Transgendered Elders: Elder Abuse and Neglect Issues (1998, Alternate Link): Social prejudice against transgendered persons (transphobia) is, in many cases, even more intense than that directed against Lesbians and Gay men. Surveys of transgendered persons consistently show an extremely high rate of violent victimization, including higher-than-average rates of street violence and of childhood violence perpetuated by parents and caregivers (Bowen, 1996; Courvant, 1997; Wilchins, 1997). Transgendered persons face prejudice from family members, employers, the general public, and "helping professionals." - Trans and Intersex Survivors of Domestic Violence: Defining Terms, Barriers, & Responsibilities (2000/2001, Alternate Link): Clearly, trans and intersex survivors exist. Like other domestic violence survivors, they need the help of service agencies, including shelters, to free themselves from abusive partners and to learn to recognize future abusive relationships before the abuse becomes extreme. Unfortunately, few ever manage to access these services openly. There are many reasons why so few trans and intersex survivors are served by the community that typically aids and advocates for survivors of domestic violence. - Trans Issues in Aging: Information for Health Care Providers (2004, Outward): Although they are often invisible to professionals in the field of aging - and indeed to society in general - transgender (TG) and transsexual (TS) individuals clearly form a more than negligible percentage of the U.S. population. These elders not only require the same care as all older adults, they also need care - and face obstacles - specifically related to their gender status. - American Society on Aging: Transgender Resources.

Transgender Health: - Aging Resources. - Tarynn Witten’s Bibliography: Transgender Aging (To 2008). -  Growing Old Gracefully: The Transgender Experience (2012): A documentary film in production that highlights the trials many transgender people face when growing older. The film features the true life stories of five transgender elders, who are currently dealing with many of the issues that come with age, and also includes interviews with trans activists such as Jamison Green, and doctors and researchers. - The Needs of Older Trans People (2003): Thanks to Dick Moore for providing the report and permission to reproduce many of its findings here. - Aging in Transgender People: An Annotated Bibliography (2003).
 
A home for transgender elderly in Indonesia (2013, Video): Indonesia's first home for transgender elderly people will soon be receiving government help. But discrimination, illness and poverty are still rife for the marginalised community. - World's first old people's home for the transgender (2013, YouTube): Traditionally elderly people in Indonesia are cared for their families but that's not the case for the countries more than three million strong transgender community. They are often rejected by their family who are ashamed of them. Many elderly transgenders who use to survive as prostitutes end up begging on the streets. But now perhaps the world's first old people's home for transgender is being built on the outskirts of the capital Jakarta. - World’s first home for transgender elderly (2013): As part of new moves towards acceptance, the government will in March begin supporting the home, which officially opened in November, with a basic nutrition programme while offering business seed money to 200 transgender residents in the city. However, most of the funds needed to support the home will continue to come from its founder, Yulianus Rettoblaut, a waria and prominent activist better-known as Mami Yuli, who turned her own house into the shelter last year. “We are focusing on elderly waria because NGOs usually focus on young ones,” the 51-year-old told AFP. She was inspired to take action after seeing many of her fellow ageing waria on the streets, ill, unemployed and forced to live in squalid conditions.    
 

Ageism & Prejudice

Old Lesbians Organizing for Change: What is Ageism? Related Issues: What is Ageism?  Ageism is a social disease. Are you ageist?  Do you consider "young" a compliment and "old" a derogatory synonym for ugly, decrepit, out-of-date ("You don't look your age.")?  Do you speak/do for an Old Lesbian instead of letting her speak/do for herself and assume she needs help?  Do you view an Old Lesbian either as a burden or an icon, rather than as an equal with whom a reciprocal relationship is desirable?  Do you patronize a courageous Old Lesbian by trivializing her anger as "feistiness?" (Would you call Superman "feisty"?)  Do you categorize an outspoken Old Lesbian as "complaining," "difficult," or "crotchety?"  Do you assume that an Old Lesbian is asexual?  Are you unsupportive of an Old Lesbian looking for a partner, or disrespectful of an Old Lesbian's choice to be single?  Do you refrain from confronting ageist remarks because they are "not really meant that way?" - Old Lesbian group fights racism, ageism (2010): Racism and ageism were themes for the keynote speakers at the Old Lesbians Organizing for Change national gathering here in July, and for the speakout sessions done in a format known as “fishbowls.” The 150 participants ranged in age from 59 to 87. - Cleveland Pride 2011 - (OLOC) Old Lesbians For Change (2011, YouTube): They are a national network of old lesbians over age 60 working to confront ageism in their communities and all over the country. They use education and public discourse as their primary tools. Their national organization is directed by a Steering Committee that works to form and support local groups who will work in their own communities. They believe that they have a great deal of wisdom, experience and strength to share with communities as well as among themselves.

Ageism – A Radical Lesbian Feminist Perspective (2012): Do not name me against my will. Do not presume to know how I want to be named without asking me. Do not call me “elder,” “elderly,” “geriatric,” or “crone.” Do not assume that naming me in a category as different from yourself is flattering. Do not assume that I agree to be part of the mainstream ageist and heterosexist separation of females. Ageism is one of the many ways that patriarchy divides women from each other. Wouldn’t it be better to make all Lesbians and women welcome and have truly inclusive and diverse Lesbian communities without driving anyone away by “othering” and oppressing her? Similarly, do not call me “cis” or “cunt.” Even the feminist/Wiccan “maiden, mother, crone” is based on sexism and heterosexism – pre-fucked, currently fucked, post-fucked – all identities associated with bonding with men, with no recognition of females who say no to men and to male rules and patriarchy. I do not agree to any of it. My identity is based on being a Lesbian...I am not even that old at 61, and I don’t feel very different from how I’ve always felt. You don’t make a decision to become old. It just happens. So it will happen to everyone, if they live long enough. It is therefore in all women’s interest that old females be treated with respect and equality... Barbara Macdonald’s (with Cynthia Rich) book, Look Me in the Eye: Old Women, Aging and Ageism, from 1983, is still the best book I’ve read about ageism, with that old Seventies direct, radical, and sensible Radical Lesbian Feminist politics that I rarely see now. The book began when Barbara was 62 and Cynthia was 41. Barbara described being so alone as an old woman in her community, treated as “other” by younger women. Almost thirty years later, my experience is very different, though ageism of course still exists and younger women are clearly more valued. I see older Lesbians being dismissed with a glance, just as I see those with less privilege in other ways dismissed. Still, old and older Lesbians now have a huge loving community. We no longer have our bookstores, coffee houses, or bars, so we meet in public, het, or gay male spaces for a night. There is so much for older Lesbians that sometimes I have to choose between five events in one evening. One of my friends in her twenties likes to go to the dances where ages range from twenties to seventies. I also love that age diversity, especially when older is the majority. - Lesbian Wimmin's Views of Older Wimmin.

Aging Report: Are Gay Men More Ageist Than Ever? (2012). - Ageism remains rampant in LGBT community (2011): Our culture’s increasing comfort with LGBT folk has encouraged elders to come out late in life. This is terrific. Yet while freeing, leaving the closet can turn your life upside down. How comfortable with and supportive of are we in the queer community of these elders who are coming out? Along with SAGE, there are organizations for LGBT elders ranging from Prime Timers (a social network for gay men) to Old Lesbians Organizing for Change. Yet despite this support, ageism is rampant in the LGBT (as in the straight) community. “When people hear ‘senior,’ they don’t think of love or sex,” Kathleen DeBold, president of Moving Experiences, a transition program for seniors, told me. “People don’t see their images,” said Ken South, president of Prime-Timers of Washington, D.C. “If you look at photos of the recent Gay Pride parade, the average age is about 24.” Overcoming ageism will take some work. We can start by opening our eyes to the vibrant images of our elders.
- Who Cares? (2007): If ageism is a social disease in our culture in general, it is an epidemic in GLBT culture. You don't have to go very far to see the clues all around you. In preparation for this “Outing Age” workshop I counted the pictures in one issue of my local gay paper. I counted 174 pictures and of these I surmised that maybe seven were of gay people over 50. They included, Gay Episcopal Bishop Gene Robinson, some ads for counselors, and an ad for plastic surgery.  The only pictures of other people over 50 in that issue included: Congressman Pete Stark, President Bush, The Pope, Bishop Tutu, Nigerian Archbishop Peter Akinola and Congressman Bob Barr. So where do old GLBT people find images of themselves? - Aging Out: Exploring Ageism and Heterosexism Among African American Lesbians and Gay Males (2012).

Ageism In The Gay Community (2012): I was recently responding to a friend's blog about some of the problems within the gay community, which inspired me to write this blog. The truth is, Ageism is extremely prominent within the gay community. If you are an older man who makes a habit of going to gay bars and clubs, you are thought of as "creepy" by the younger gay crowd. What a shame. I have personally been to clubs where someone who is a bit older was in attendance, and I was shocked by how often I had overheard people saying things like "look at that old guy over there, I hope he doesn't talk to me". How rude and snobbish can you be?It's a fact that within the gay community there is too much emphasis on superficial matters. This obviously plays a part in the rampant ageism. - Ageism is an LGBT Issue (2011): It is a positive step in the right direction that LGBT people and their supporters are finally paying attention to the toll bigotry takes on youth. However, our analysis rarely goes deep enough to begin to unpack the intersectional role that ageism plays in these tragedies. As long as we refuse to take into account the way that ageist social structures unnecessarily inhibit the liberty, equality, and pursuit of happiness of our youngest LGBT people, our analysis of the problem will be toothless and incomplete.

Alienation, ambivalence, agency: Middle-aged gay men and ageism in Manchester’s gay village (2013): Based on interviews with 27 men and 20 observation sessions, this article explores how middle-aged gay men’s accounts/experiences of Manchester’s ‘gay village’ indicate various uses of ‘ageing capital’ (at times problematic) that differentiate them from other gay men. Men’s spoken and bodily expressed accounts indicate three responses to gay ageism. First, the village represents an alienated space where middle-aged men felt subject to ageist scrutiny or else erased from ‘the scene’. Second, the village represents ambivalent space of intermixed pleasures and dangers where middle-aged gay men negotiate with age-related norms. Third, middle-aged gay men could challenge gay ageism and render parts of the village more convivial. - Better for Whom? Ageism and the LGBT Community (2012): Last week I wrote about ageism, a widespread, seriously underexposed problem. If you agree that it’s a problem in general, try being LGBT and old. The “It Gets Better” campaign (a credit to Dan Savage, who started it) urges and encourages LGBT youth to hang in there in the face of homophobic bullying and rejection, with the promise of a better, easier future. It’s a great idea, very much needed, and it’s helping. But for someone age fifty, sixty, or older, “it gets better” tends to beg the question, When? - PTS tackles ageism in Ottawa's queer community (2013): Seminar aims to repair generational divide... The majority of PTS’s staff, volunteers and service users are younger queer people. This has created a youth-driven culture, which is positive, Van den Heuvel says, especially since people often lament a lack of involvement from youth.  However, the cultural shift that this entails can also alienate older generations and become a barrier to their participation, she says.

Chicago Task Force on LGBT Aging (2003). LGBT Persons in Chicago: Growing Older: A Survey of Needs and Perceptions. PDF Download. The survey also revealed significant frustration with and criticism of the larger LGBT community. Findings suggest that seniors often feel either invisible or unwanted within the LGBT community and suggested that the LGBT community needs to become more aware of and to value the life experiences and collective wisdom of its elders. Respondents reported significant social barriers to interaction among different age groups within the LGBT community, and that opportunities for intergenerational contact and interaction would go a long way toward beginning to bridge those barriers. Some respondents commented that advertising targeting the LGBT community reinforces such ageism by placing an even greater emphasis than main-stream media on youth in images used to sell everything from alcohol and automobiles to lingerie, medications, and sex.

Gay Ageism: A Particular Vulnerability (2011): I have reflected in my last post on the fact that the gay community, more specifically, the gay, male community, has internalized negative narratives regarding gay aging that are propagated by the dominant, heterosexist culture. That narrative is, of course, re-enforced by the broader culture of youth that has prevailed in Western Society since the Sixties. It is not to be expected that the gay community would be impervious to that broader, cultural trend; however, I want to suggest that the community has, in fact, been particularly susceptible to some of its more destructive consequences. Such vulnerability exists because of characteristics which are either particularly present or specific to the gay male community itself; characteristics that have served to augment the negative narrative present in the wider culture; creating a negative feedback loop. The emphasis on the value of youth and the horrors of gay aging transmitted by the dominant culture feed negative perceptions and experiences of aging endemic to the gay community; the extreme negativity toward aging in the gay community strengthens the perception of the accuracy of the perspective of the dominant culture. Each trip through the loop augments the negativity; re-enforces the narrative serving the interests of the dominant, heterosexist culture and diminishing the lives of gay men.

SAGE Central VA Has Great Community Conversation on Ageism (2012): SAGE Central Virginia had a great Community Conversation on Ageism... The panel presentation was both interesting and engaging, from Dr. Watson’s personal accounts of ageism
both toward older and younger people to information about different kinds of ageism and how culture is very youth oriented. Several of the panelists mentioned the very youth oriented culture and how the gay culture specifically has been even more youth oriented; Rev. Gorsline told the story about how when he came out, 30 was “over the hill” for gay men. Several of the panelist talked about the various ways we experience ageism both internal ageism, how we see ourselves and hold ourselves to cultural ideas of age, and external ageism, how others treat us. Dr. Cramer put a different spin on it talking about implicit ageism.

Ageism in the LGBT Community (2012, YouTube): Related Commentary: My partner and I made the mistake of visiting a gay club a while back...I was 55 and he's 64. It was like a scene in an old Western movie, when the bad-guy walks into the saloon...it got very, very quiet, and we could feel every eye on us. We sat at the bar for a bit, but, there were just too many almost-whispered comments ("old man sex...ew," was one of the kindest), so, we left. Nice to see that there are at least a few younger guys with intelligence and class. Nice video! - Ageism in the LGBT Community with Josh Rimer, Alex Life of A Gay, PappaNikko Fab5 Collab (2013, YouTube): Commentary: I'm a lesbian and this was so well done! I loved the different viewpoints and the intelligent personal insights. I wish there was more on this topic and more collaboration within the LGBT community. I will subscribe!

Barbara MacDonald: A Pioneer Theorist of Ageism (2008): Editorial Note: Gay and Gray is a monthly column at Time Goes By written by Jan Adams in which she thinks out loud for us on issues of aging lesbians and gay men. Jan also writes on many topics at her own blog, Happening-Here.]:In 1983 (along with her partner Cynthia Rich), Barbara MacDonald published a collection of essays titled Look Me in the Eye: Old Women, Aging and Ageism. With this slim book, MacDonald put the lesbian feminism movement of that time on notice: in carving out space for ourselves as lesbian women, we were ignoring, excluding, and rendering invisible the few old women around us - and the old women we ourselves would one day become... I had not thought of MacDonald's book in many years until Marian Van Eyk McCain of Elderwomanblog reminded me of it in comments on a previous Gay and Gray column. When I first encountered it, I was one of those youngish women among whom MacDonald was never sure she could find a place. Today I am almost as old as Barbara was when she began writing these essays. Reading it again was a profound experience I had hope I have succeeded in sharing here. Look Me in the Eye is presently out of print, so I have taken the liberty here of offering long quotations to share the flavor of what hold up well as a challenging work by a brave woman.

My Queer Agenda: Racism (2012): Age ain’t nothing but a number. But in the gay world, it can mean the  difference between a warm welcoming smile and a nasty glare. Say hello to ageism... The image of the gay community is built on youthful, muscular attractive (usually white) men. Or so it’s portrayed in the media.  Rarely do you see anything to the contrary.  But that doesn’t mean that older gay men don’t exist.  After all, they’re the ones that fought for us to enjoy a life of freedom. I understand that everyone has preferences but that doesn’t mean that we can’t be polite or respectful... There are many other issues associated with ageism… This is just the tip of the iceberg. So how can we challenge the stereotype that growing old is a bad thing? - Ageism in the Gay Black Community (2012): I talked to younger and older gay Black guys who said older guys shouldn’t be at the clubs, that they have been there, done that and they should leave the clubs to the young people.  A lot of younger guys don’t like older guys being around them and by the same token many older guys don’t like being around younger guys. It’s like we should never invade each other’s world.  Many young people aren’t open to being mentored by older men because they lived in a time without technology so what can they learn from them.
 
Ageism and activism… (2010): For all of you who felt the pain of Wednesday’s news of the stay now is the time to not ask, but demand your fundamental rights. We have shouted, yelled, rioted, protested, rallied together, celebrated, marched, fought, died, lost and won. We have asked and pleaded at times, being polite and at other times demanding. Every person under thirty owes a huge thank you to the many that came before us, who have made possible what we take for granted. We truly stand on the backs of giants. They stood in a time and place where militant action risked it all: job, friends, family, safety and life itself. How do some in the community repay them? Many have respect for the generations that came before them, valuing their wisdom and contributions. Others see only the present, denigrating the old with harsh looks, comments like troll and dirty old man. Too often they are greeted with disapproving stares and cruel asides when they dare to try to socialize in clubs and bars packed with the fresh young faces they once were. What do you think will happen to you one day? - LGBT-on-LGBT age discrimination / Social Chaos: Bill's Briefs (2011): Lacking, however, has been coverage of LGBT-on-LGBT age discrimination. The obsession with youth, especially with the guys, creates an unwelcome part of a senior’s life. As we age we slowly realize we are no longer welcomed at the table. We fight with creams, diets and fashions, but Father Time wins. For gays, old is out. A few years ago in Tokyo a new bar opened. My interest was piqued, so I checked and was assured foreigners were allowed. So off I went. I barely got in the door when a cute young man ran up to me. I smiled beguilingly, but he didn’t. Instead he pointed to a sign in English. I expected the usual “no foreigners allowed.” But no; it read, “All guests must be 37 or under.” Not 35. Not 40. Thirty-seven? Worse, it continued “… and look it.” Closer to home, more recently I went on an all-gay cruise...

Can Intergenerational Connection Battle Ageism Within the LGBT Community? (2011): Ageism is hurtful to all older people, but it can be particularly devastating for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders. Not only do LGBT elders face ageism in the community at large, but they face marginalization within the LGBT community as well... However, a new report, Celebrating Intergenerational Diversity Among LGBT People  by London’s International Longevity Centre (ILC), shows that creative efforts to bring LGBT youth and elders together can play a critical role in combatting the destructive impact of social isolation and ageism on LGBT elders. These efforts may help forge enduring new bonds that will dramatically improve the situation of LGBT elders and give LGBT youth a stronger sense of their community and history. - International Longevity Centre (2011). Celebrating Intergenerational Diversity Among LGBT People. Download Page. Executive Summary: PDF Download.

Semon, Theodore (2012). Eyes Wide Open: Emancipating the Elderly Gay and Lesbian from Invisibility & Discrimination. Honor Disssertation, Georgetown University. PDF Download. We live in a culture that glorifies the youth and devalues the elderly. Although a majority of cultures instill a personal responsibility to care for aging family members, many western countries have created a surrogate to bear such a responsibility – the retirement home. What happens when this idiosyncratic facet of our society is com pounded with an overarching and prolonged discrimination toward the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LG BT ) community? The resulting two - factor disadvantage is a harsh reality to the invisible aging LGBT individual and a primary factor behind a wide range of complex issues affecting this often discriminated group. This thesis intertwines empirical research, qualitative interviews, historical references, theoretical perspectives, and personal insight in order to provide a holistic conception of elderl y LGBT experience. Once specific themes of deprivation are identified, the recourse for their amelioration is rooted in intergenerational dialogue. Conversation between the young and elderly LGBT populations must be rooted in mutual affinity. No longer can the non - generational characteristic of sexual minorities be a deterrent for the interchange of knowledge, support, and responsibility. The LGBT community has consistently demonstrated resiliency in the face of widespread crises as is evident in widespread outreach during the HIV outbreak of the 1980s and the current anti - gay bullying terrorizing schools across the nation . This thesis demands the same level of innovation and advocacy through its resolve to expose, uncover , and raise cultural awareness on this disadvantaged group.

Johnson Jr, Michael (2013). Race, Aging and Gay In/Visibilityon U.S. Television. PDF Download. In: Television and the Self: Knowledge, Identity, and Media Representation edited by Kathleen M. Ryan, Deborah A. Macey (Google Books). I have always been particularly troubled by the fact that gay men often appear on television in the midst of their youth or perpetually in their early adulthood.The abject invisibility of gay men as “elders/seniors” or, the pathologizinghyper-visibility of “older” gay men as stereotypical sexual predators has permeated the televisual landscape. 1 While there is extensive scholarship on theissue of aging, ageism and its sociocultural importance for gay men in asubculture that valorizes youth, little research has been conducted into how this phenomenon is perpetuated and perhaps instigated through the ubiquity of television. Indeed, even less research has successfully explored the intersectionsof age for gay men of color in terms of televisual invisibility.The purpose of this chapter is to critically interrogate these issues todetermine what the contemporary televisual landscape reveals and what, if anyopportunities presage the appearance of characters on networks for queer men of color in the later stages of adulthood. Methodologically, I use textual analysiscombined with cultivation theory as a basis for establishing truth claims thatconstruct a theoretical framework through which my analysis is conducted. Inthis chapter, I argue that despite the increased visibility of gay men oncontemporary telenarratives (both on broadcast and cable networks) people of color remain stubbornly less visible and even within those examples of whitegay men who dominate the airwaves, few if any depict men over the age of 40or gay elders over the age of retirement. This invisibility operates a heuristic that pedagogically educates viewers to interpellate gay men as perpetually young or as young adults, thereby rendering middle aged or elders as alternativelyinconsequential or dangerous through their conspicuous absence. 
 
Older Lesbian Experiences of Homophobia and Ageism (2013): Utilizing specific data from a national, online 115-question survey, the authors examined the perceived discrimination experiences of 456 lesbians older than the age of 51. Experiences explored included ageism and homophobia in a variety of relationships and social settings. Quantitative analysis and several open-ended questions provided qualitative descriptions of their experiences with discrimination. The findings indicate that older lesbians have experienced homophobia, heterosexism, and ageism in a variety of settings including housing, employment, health care, social situations, family relationships, or shopping/dining out.

Potter C, Bamford S-M, Kneale D (2011, International Longevity Centre - UK). Bridging the gap: Exploring the potential for bringing older and younger LGBT people together. Download Page. PDF Download. This paper is particularly interested in the interaction between age and sexual or gender identity and how these characteristics shape individuals‘ experiences, behaviours and attitudes. Specifically it is concerned with the issues facing older (65+) and younger (under 25) LGBT individuals, the divisions and commonalities between them and whether there is potential to bring the two groups together for mutual benefit... Despite being at different ends of the age spectrum, many older and younger LGBT people will therefore share experiences of marginalisation within society and discrimination by support services. They may also be dealing with some specific mental and physical health concerns, the risks of which may be heightened by their sexual or gender orientation. Traditional mainstream interventions do not appear to offer adequate support to these two groups. Intergenerational approaches could offer an innovative alternative.

Kneale D, Serra V, Bamford S-M, Diener L (2011, International Longevity Centre - UK ). Celebrating Intergenerational Diversity: An evaluation of three projects working withyounger and older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender people. Download Page. PDF Download. All three projects aimed to enable older and younger people to share and learn new skills, improve understanding between younger and older people, foster mutual support and celebrate LGBT heritage. This report describes the project activities; the evaluation process; provides detail on the recruitment and retention methods; outlines the pre-existing need for intergenerational work; illuminates the respective benefits of using different methods to bring older and younger people together; and assesses the success of the projects against the objectives set out at the beginning of the projects. We find that the projects were successful in meeting most of the objectives, and set out summaries of the main benefits of an intergenerational approach used in the projects below.

Bamford S-M, Kneale D, Watson J (2011, International Longevity Centre - UK ). Intergenerational projects for the LGBT community; A toolkit to inspire and inform. Download Page. PDF Download. Anecdotal evidence has always told us that contact between older and younger lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people is overwhelmingly absent. It features rarely in family contexts, which are the primary source of most people’s intergenerational relationships, such as between grandparents and grandchildren. More formally, there are few organised contexts in which older and younger LGB and T people have the opportunity to meet. The consequences can be disquieting, with an absence of any kind of intergenerational support or positive older role models. At Age UK, we have a proud history of promoting intergenerational work and a growing reputation for our equalities work with lesbian, gay, bisexual and, increasingly, transgender people in later life. So we have long felt that bringing the two together in an LGBT intergenerational project was an idea whose time had come... This resource shares the learning of those projects. Fortuitously, it coincides with the publication of Stonewall’s ambitious new research into the needs and aspirations of lesbian, gay and bisexual people in later life, which highlights the much greater likelihood of LGB people ageing alone and without intergenerational contact. We hope therefore it will provide ideas and practical examples, not only to encourage support for older people but also to foster a more positive sense of the future among younger LGB and T members of our communities.

Community must conquer ageist stereotypes (1998, Alternate Link): A huge portion of the task the Gay community has undertaken in its 30-odd years of organized existence is identifying and countering - personally, socially, and politically - stereotypes about homosexuality. Although the organized anti-ageism movement is nearly that old, too (the Gray Panthers was founded in 1970 and articles and conferences on Lesbian and Gay male aging began appearing in the late 1970s), efforts to root out ageism have not gained the momentum or respect Gay civil rights campaigns have. They need to. And Lesbians and Gay men should be in the forefront of this effort. - From  a Salon Magazine Interview with Edmund White (1997): "  If you say you're going to be dead by 40, they say, "So what? There's no gay life after 40, anyway." Especially in France, but even here. You can easily be a gay in his 20s and never meet a gay over 40 because you don't see them in the bars. They don't go out, they're not part of your world, and if you do see them, you consider them pathetic." - Older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) and Transgender (LGBT) Substance Abuse Issues: Are Substance Abuse Issues: Are They at Higher Risk for They at Higher Risk for Substance Substance Abuse (2002, PDF Download). - Ageism: If straight seniors must struggle against becoming invisible as they age, gay elders have been almost non-existent in society's mirror. Since many queers who are reaching old age during the 2000s came of age well before the gay liberation movement, they may have spent much of their lives in the closet without the support of a visible community.. Discrimination against older queers does not always come from the straight world. Within the gay and lesbian communities, youth has often been a prized commodity. Gay men might seek slimness and attractiveness, while lesbians tend to value strength and athletic vigor, but for both groups accepting the aging process presents a challenge. Though there are undeniably queers of all ages, there is often little interaction across generations and therefore little understanding of the issues of differing age groups.

Elephant Graveyards (1999): Gay Aging and Gay Ageism in the Year 2000 (Alternate Link): Many gay men have made aging complicated and painful for themselves by adopting an ageist caste system that rules their social and sex life. It’s as ruthless as the caste system in India ever was. Goddess help you if you break the rules. "You hang with guys your own age. Young guys don't talk to older guys, or even hang with them," insists a 23-year-old. "It labels you." Evidently the idea of an older sugar daddy is not something that many Generation X'ers want to flaunt. This caste system is extra complicated for men who happen to look younger than their age. Many older men's fragile egos can't handle socializing with men their own age who look younger than they do. Age caste is most excruciating for men from the 1970s and '80s Generations, who lost friends to AIDS. My business partner Tyler St. Mark told me: "If the rule is hang out with your own age group, who am I supposed to hang out with? Most of my old friends are dead." One 60-something man in Chicago, who used to be a mythic figure in the leather world and also had his losses, says: "I don't go out any more. Nobody there but ghosts." Many lesbians deal with aging better than gay men do. But for every silver-haired Barbara Gittings (to whom I presented an award last year, who is still out there breaking lances for gay rights in the American Library Association) there are the older women I know who have withdrawn from "community life". "I’m tired of being ignored," said one 50-year-old woman, "or made to feel unwelcome at any women's event where pheronomes are in the air. I’d rather live in Skokie and babysit my straight son’s kids." 

Trušník, Roman (2010). From “Youth and Beauty” to “Age and Decrepitude”: Age, Ageing, and Ageism in American Gay Fiction. In: Roman Trušník et al (Eds). Proceedings of the Second International Conference on English and American Studies at Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Czech Republic, 207-214. PDF Download. The paper deals with the treatment of age-related issues in American gay literature, focusing on Christopher Isherwood’s A Single Man (1964) and Andrew Holleran’s Dancer from the Dance (1978) and The Beauty of Men (1996). Even though Holleran’s The Beauty of Men is inspired by A Single Man, there is a major difference between the two authors: while the protagonist of Isherwood’s novel is isolated from other gay men, Holleran’s protagonists in many ways interact with gays of other generations. A line of mentor-protégé relationships can be identified in Dancer from the Dance, while the characters of The Beauty of Men replace the vertical line of relationships with a horizontal network of peers, losing some of the opportunities offered by intergenerational interaction.

'New Leaf' bridges generation gap in LGBT community: Writing workshop keeps older gays connected with others (2007): “The isolation of the seniors of this community and in the world is incredible,” said Smyth. “It’s a youth-oriented world that we live in, and in the gay community it’s even more powerful because there’s the sexuality involved, and you’re no longer a sexual being.” - Facing Life After 40 (2004): “Apparently, this young fellow wasn’t remotely interested in where I lived, what I did for a living … if I did drugs … beat up my boyfriend when I was pissed off … Just ‘How old?’ as if my age defined me in total,” Bergling says. That was Bergling’s first encounter with ageism among gay men. The 1996 experience wasn’t unique, say Bergling and other experts on aging. 

Fear and Loathing (2000): "The new play, You Look for Me, by playwright Paul Harris, recently caught my attention because it tackles an issue so rarely portrayed in our newspapers, magazines, art, literature or theater: older gay men." - Better Respect for Lesbian and Gay Elders (1999): After his partner's death, an older man is kicked out of his home -- the house the two men shared for nearly two decades. A nursing home aide adamantly refuses to "wash the lesbian." A 75-year-old woman keeps photos of her deceased life partner and all other signs of her identity as a lesbian hidden away, fearful of anti-gay reprisals or abuse from staff and fellow residents at her nursing home. - Calling All Geezers (2001, Must Scroll): "Now why did that get your attention? If you’re like me, a gay man over 50, you may be sensitive to geezerdom but having trouble relating to its implications. We don’t really feel that much different than we did at 35 but we sure are perceived differently..." - Study charts aging gay concerns: "Older gay men, lesbians and bisexuals can feel largely shut out from their own communities, according to new Nottingham Trent research. "Older gay men, lesbians and bisexuals can feel largely shut out from their own communities, according to new Nottingham Trent research."- Gays Fight Their Own Prejudices Homosexuals Confront Such Issues As Racism, Ageism (1991).

Schope RD (2005). Who’s Afraid of Growing Old? Gay and Lesbian Perceptions of Aging. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 45(4): 23-39. PDF Download. This article is a study of how gay men and lesbian individuals perceive the aging process. The findings indicate that gay men have more negative views of how gay society views growing older and how they view their own growing older than do lesbian respondents. Gay men were also found to be more ageist, have a greater fear of negative evaluation by others, and give more importance to their own physical attractiveness. Implications for social work practice with elder homosexuals are addressed.

Cahill S, South K, Spade J: NGLTF (2000). Outing Age: Public Policy Issues Affecting Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Elders. PDF Download. PDF Download. Download Page. All NGLTF Documents. Manifestations of ageism within the GLBT community include beauty standards that privilege youth, the exclusion of old people from community discussions, and the absence of senior issues from the mainstream GLBT political agenda. However, the problem of ageism in GLBT communities is more than just a problem of attitude; it is also structural. Why are organizations and social institutions within the GLBT community age segregated? There is a general lack of outreach to elders; few programs honor their contributions; and very few articles in the GLBT press feature GLBT old people, except for those done with a historical perspective. Discounts for elders are rarely given for admission to GLBT events. There are very few intentional intergenerational organizations, with the GLBT religious community as probably the most visible exception. In a recent article, Patricia Nell Warren summed up the issue when she said: “Community means all of us, numerically including the old. I won’t use the term again till we’ve earned it...and I will do my part to help bring those changes about. Till then, we need to stop kidding ourselves. Age bias is destroying the very gay world that we’re trying so hard to build.” 

Grant JM, et al. (2010). Outing Age 2010: Public Policy Issues Affecting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Elders. National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute. PDF Download. Download Page. Ageism is an unfortunate fact of American life. Young people are both exploited and held up as the standard bearers of beauty, vibrancy, and innovation—and old people are seen as a drain on societal assets, their rich store of experiences and skills widely ignored. While many LGBT people work to confront oppressive behaviors and practices that harm our community, ageism is an issue that has received relatively little notice on the list of LGBT social-justice concerns... Organizing for Change (OLOC), a national advocacy group of lesbians ages 60-plus, has been a longtime leader in confronting ageism. The OLOC website offers this forceful statement: “Old has become a term of insult and shame. To be ‘old’ means to be ignored and scorned, to be made invisible and expendable. We refute the lie that it is shameful to be an ‘old’ woman. We name ourselves ‘old lesbians’ because we will no longer accommodate ourselves to language that implies in any way that old means inferior. We call ourselves old with pride. In doing so, we challenge the stereotypes directly. Thus, we empower and change ourselves, each other, and the world.” Gay and bisexual men appear to have had little connection to this dialogue, with some notable exceptions. Writer Andrew Holleran’s 1996 novel The Beauty of Men and Johnny Symons’s 1997 documentary fi lm Beauty Before Age mine this important territory. Articles in the popular and professional LGBT media have likewise addressed the topic on occasion, but no national organization has emerged to work consistently against ageism among gay and bisexual men.71 Ageism thus continues to have a signifi cant impact on gay and bisexual men’s sense of self-worth and attractiveness over the lifespan.

Ageism and HIV (2001): Most HIV prevention programs have been remised in providing specific HIV prevention programming for the over 50 LGBT community. As with most of the prevention work currently being conducted addresses behaviors and not labels, in this case being old. By engaging in particular behaviors, people place themselves at risk for a multitude of health related issues, which we all know. However, age is not a behavior which puts people at risk, rather a unique factor which should be addressed when providing behavior based prevention programs. Much of the lack of prevention comes from societal beliefs that old people are no longer interested in having sex, or if they are, no one is interested in them; if they are sexually active, it is assumed in a monogamous relationship; and that they don't do drugs, although if they did it was long ago. These myths reinforce the barriers to providing HIV prevention, early detection, medical care and social services for people over 50. - What are you really afraid of? Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex ageing, ageism, and activism (2002, PDF Download) (Alternate Link). - NGLTF Releases Report on Old GLBT People (2000) : The NGLTF Aging Initiative includes four main goals: to collect and distribute factual information on the needs and realities facing GLBT elders; to raise consciousness within the GLBT community about ageism; to secure inclusion of GLBT seniors in all service, policy and aging frameworks; and to form partnerships with mainstream aging advocacy groups to increase advocacy on behalf of GLBT elders. 

‘Stuck in the quagmire of an HIV ghetto’: the meaning of stigma in the lives of older black gay and bisexual men living with HIV in New York City (2011): In this paper, we analyse the life history narratives of 10 poor gay and bisexual Black men over the age of 50 living with HIV/AIDS in New York City, focusing on experiences of stigma. Three overarching themes are identified. First, participants described the ways in which stigma marks them as ‘just one more body’ within social and medical institutions, emphasising the dehumanisation they experience in these settings. Second, respondents described the process of ‘knowing your place’ within social hierarchies as a means through which they are rendered tolerable. Finally, interviewees described the dynamics of stigma as all-consuming, relegating them to the ‘quagmire of an HIV ghetto’. These findings emphasise that despite advances in treatment and an aging population of persons living with HIV, entrenched social stigmas continue to endanger the well-being of Black men who have sex with men.

Robinson, Peter (2011). Chapter 12: The Influence of Ageism on Relations between Old and Young Gay Men. Full Text. In: Out Here: Gay and Lesbian Perspectives VI - 2011 - edited by Yorick Smaal and Graham Willett. This chapter considers how gay men aged 40 and over understand the ageism that operates in the gay world. It draws on data collected from interviews with 21 Australian and North American men aged between 40 and 79. The Australian men were recruited from Sydney and Hobart and the North American men from New York and Los Angeles – as part of a larger study on ageing in the gay world. The two primary narratives the men used were first, that gay men were ageist because the gay world was youth obsessed – a public narrative that is common to both homosexuals and heterosexuals – and second, that the young gay men they personally knew were not ageist and respected them. The four secondary narratives comprise stories about (a) respecting old gay men; (b) hustling as a conduit for beneficial relations between different generations of gay men; (c) teenage gays being oblivious to anyone older than 20; (d) old gay men as predatory or sexually undesirable. Both primary and secondary narratives are revealing for what they suggest about the varying influence that public and private narratives can have on gay men’s self identity and how they live their lives... Conclusion: The narrative stream connecting the interviewees’ stories linked the following points. First, that mainstream society has a history of ageism, which the gay world simply mirrors; second, that gay identity is associated with youthfulness; third, that consequences for gay men of the ageism that exists in the gay world are (a) old men being regarded as sexless; and (b) middle-aged gay men trying to act as though they are 20; and (c) that the youthful obsession of gay men made growing older harder. Stories of older gay men’s experience of positive personal relations with young gay men point to evidence of their decentred lives, to use Arlene Stein’s phrase. That is, their lives are now less focused than they used to be on the social networks and institutions of the gay world and they can call on a wider variety of experiences and relationships to fill out their lives and identities. The collection of secondary narratives that interviewees drew on strongly suggest the absence of a universalising view of old gay men. As the discussion showed, in the eyes of a subset of the sample of men interviewed for this chapter, old gay men can be seen as respected figures either because they lived through the HIV/AIDS epidemic or only if they have been successful; young gay men can develop affective relationships with them through the means of prostitution while very young gay men can regard them as distantly but with less affection as they would their grandparents. Finally, despite the different cultural milieux from which the interviewees were drawn, a sense of commonality pervaded the stories they told of how old gay men were regarded and treated in the gay world, that is, by other, younger gay men. One explanation for the common strand running through their stories might be the internationalising effect of gay culture that has come about for a certain class of western gay men with the advent of relatively cheap air travel since the late 1970s and then more significantly, the advent of the internet since 1989.

Living in a Culture That Holds Youth and Beauty in High Regard, Older Gay Men Open up About Aging, and the Vital Role Sex Plays in Their Lives (2003): Neither of these images is entirely correct. There are a growing number of openly gay men over the ages of 50, 60, even 70, who are neither Adonises nor shlubs. And their sexual lives are still as varied and rich--if not more so--than men half their age. Not that you'd ever know that, since gay men over 50 are almost entirely absent from straight and queer media alike--magazines, TV, movies--especially when it comes to any discussion of their sex lives. Curiously, the average gay man's perception of life and sex at 65 is entirely unlike a heterosexual's.  - Homosexual Seniors Face Stigma (2003). -  Trolls and twinkies: Meditations on gay pride (2003): Ageism, we should remember, is not inevitable. It really is a product of consumer culture, in which the new and shiny is continually valorized. One may, as the Spanish do, admire youth without fetishizing it. Here again, gay people -- adventurers by nature -- have a choice to lead the culture rather than adopting its pathology.  - Age in Gay Community - Why do we want Young Guys? (2004): Age in the Gay community seems to be so important. We have all heard the jokes about being 40, What's that in Gay years? DEAD... Since that incident in the bar, I have cut off all of my donations to gay charities and have managed to convince a number of my over-40 friends to do the same.

Lesbian Notions: Too old to go to gay pride parades? (2002): And what about my generation? We taught ourselves community organizing and fundraising and built national and local lesbian and gay organizations into a powerful movement with political clout. As we get further into middle-age, we can turn our attention to defying ageism within the community by creating ways to share what we know and learn from the experiences of other generations. - Gay & Grey (2002): On the eve of the UK's first national conference discussing issues effecting older gays and lesbians, Adrian Gillan talks to Peter Robins from mature gay social group Pimpernel about the bad old days and ageism in the current cult of youth." - Homophobia, Unequal Treatment Limit Quality of Life for GLBT Elders (2001): To support these efforts, the GLBT community must examine its own ageism, value its older members, and recognize their unique concerns. GLBT activists must address aging issues, and also demand that the needs of GLBT seniors be incorporated into the work of mainstream aging organizations.- Gay and Grey: "On the eve of the UK's first national conference discussing issues effecting older gays and lesbians, Adrian Gillan talks to Peter Robins from mature gay social group Pimpernel about the bad old days and ageism in the current cult of youth." 

Abuse & Violence

Arcus Foundation, National Senior Citizens Law Center, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), Lambda Legal, National Center for Lesbian Rights, National Center for Transgender Equality (2010). LGBT Older Adults in Long-Term Care Facilities: Stories from the Field. PDF Download. Download Page. PDF Download. Download Page. Video stories and comments about the project.  This report is the result of a survey undertaken by six organizations seeking to better understand the experiences of LGBT older adults in long-term care settings. The survey also sought to capture personal comments that describe some of the varied experiences of LGBT older adults, their loved ones, and the providers who care for them. Of the 769 individuals who completed the survey, 284 identified themselves as LGBT older adults, and 485 identified themselves as family members or friends, social service providers, legal services providers, or simply “other.” Social service providers included ombudsman program representatives, state staff of area agencies on aging, administrators of area agencies on aging, nursing home administrators, doctors, social workers, nurses, psychologists, hospice workers, and owners of and workers in home health care companies... However, the most significant results of the survey are expressed in the hundreds of comments submitted, ranging from reports of staff harassment to staff refusals to provide basic services or care. Altogether, 328 people reported 853 instances of mistreatment. Instances were reported by those identifying themselves as LGBT older adults, family members, friends, social service providers, legal services providers, or other interested individuals.

LGBT Elders Raise Serious Fear about Losing Long-Term Care Facilities (2011): [New York, NY] A majority of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults who answered a national online survey believe that staff of long-term care facilities would discriminate against an LGBT elder who was open about his or her sexual orientation, and more than half believe that staff or other residents would abuse or neglect an LGBT elder. Released today, the groundbreaking report - LGBT Older Adults in Long-Term Care Facilities: Stories from the Field - utilizes survey results for the first glimpse into some of the issues faced by LGBT older adults in long-term care facilities. Of the 769 individuals who completed the survey, 328 people reported 853 instances of mistreatment in such facilities. The survey, conducted from October 2009 through June 2010 did not use a representative or scientific sample, but includes hundreds of personal comments offered by the respondents, ranging from reports of staff harassment to staff refusals to provide basic services or care. Of the 769 individuals who completed the survey, 284 identified themselves as LGBT older adults. Others said they were family members, friends, social service providers, legal services providers, or other interested individuals.

Will their today be our tomorrow? A Look At Gay & Lesbian Elder Abuse (2002): I have seen first hand how older people in general can be treated. It is my fear that the gay & lesbian elders will be treated with utter distain and disrespect simply because of our orientation... Many may not want to think about this growing problem, but we must. We will be the old people of tomorrow and it will be us that are battered, bruised and neglected. A very bleak picture of our future but no doubt an accurate one for some of us if we do not act now.. - An Elderly Gay Man's Story  (1998): I was hospitalized in the Veterans Hospital in Salt Lake City last year and the year before, and not a soul from the Ward came around or offered help. Hence, I'm quite bitter toward the hierarchy – not that they suspect that I am gay. I couldn't exist if they knew. - Gay Elder Abuse (2003): If you are under 30 you may not realize it, but yes, there are members of our community over 35.  And, there are lot over 50 and over 70!  Like it or not, we will all be senior citizens some day.  And some, older members of our neighborhood are not being treated particularly well... For those of us who are of the Loud & Proud generation, it is difficult to fathom that people live in these conditions, particularly if they have been known as proud pioneers of our present human rights. But this is also the generation who, more so than we, believe that the Police cannot/will not help, and that there are no GLBT –positive social agencies out there. Many seniors fear that they will be placed in an institution if they speak out against their so-called caregivers. Others just don’t know their rights. Some have taken on the shame that rightfully belongs to the abusive caregiver, while others just don’t want to make waves.  - LGBT Elders: Domestic Violence / Sexual Assault Resource Sheet (2003, PDF Download, PDF Download). - The LGBT Senior Population's Risk of Elder Abuse (2011).

Aging in the LGBT community: Growing older in a hostile environment (2010): Many members of the LGBT community try to hide their sexuality from home health workers. They take down pictures of their partners, remove artwork and do other things to make their homes look more heterosexual. Then, they wait for the workers to arrive, and hope they are able to conceal the truth. For many, it would be devastating if the worker found out they were gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender. They could be physically or verbally abused, and fail to get the care they need. Lastly, many members of the LGBT community face discrimination when they attempt to visit their ailing partners or play a role in their care. However, steps are being taken to put a stop to this type of discrimination.

Older gays face increased violence (2002, Alternate Link): As the first generation of largely open gays grows older, they may face an unforeseen risk of violence, according to a new study that shows a steep rise in the number of hate crimes against gays over 45. The overwhelming majority of last year's 143 victims of anti-gay crime were middle-aged and 14 percent were over 65 according to an annual statewide report released yesterday by Fenway Community Health, a Boston-based public health agency.  Twenty-one of last year's victims were senior citizens, compared with one in 2000... Pitt said she has seen multiple cases of anti-gay crimes against the aging - she has counseled older gays harassed by neighbors who saw them with their partners, others who have been shouted at in public, and some who have been beaten.Pitt said elderly victims usually have a delayed reaction, and don't realize until days later how the incident affected them.  Often elderly victims become inexplicably depressed, and begin losing sleep and crying sporadically before they realize they've been truly hurt. "It's an assault on a person's identity, and it goes right to the heart of that person," Pitt said.

Murder Charge Laid In Disappearance Of Elderly Gay Toronto Man (2006): Investigators also found the Walker's bank account had been cleaned out and other assets had been cashed in.  A check of Walker's computer showed he had met a man in a popular gay chat site and had arranged to meet at Walker's home. - Task Force mourns death of elderly Detroit man viciously beaten in hate-laced attack (2007): A 72-year-old Detroit man who was attacked Feb. 13 and left paralyzed from the neck down died today in what his family is calling a hate crime. Andrew Anthos, who was known in Michigan for his longtime campaign to illuminate the dome of the state capitol for one night each year in red, white and blue lights, was on a city bus when a man reportedly approached him and asked him if he was gay. The man continued to harass Anthos, followed him off the bus at the stop in front of his building and then viciously beat Anthos with a metal pipe, striking him from behind. Anthos, who family members said was gay, was in a coma in the days immediately preceding his death. - Bus rider killed in hate crime attack: Man with pipe asked 72-year-old victim if he was gay (2007): Man with pipe asked 72-year-old victim if he was gay. - Update: Suspect caught in murder of two elderly gay men (2008): Michael Brown, a suspect in last month's murders of Eric Hendricks and Milton Lindgren has been arrested in California. Hendricks, 73, and Lindgren, 70, were found beaten to death in their home in late October. The two men had been targeted earlier for their sexuality. Their phone and cable lines were cut and "FAG" was spray painted on the house. Thankfully, the likelihood that the homicides were a hate crime is diminishing quickly. - Elderly Gay Man First Miami Murder Of 2008 (2008): Miami-Dade police are searching for a 20-year old man in connection with the murder of an elderly gay man who had taken him into his home. The body of Alexio Bello, 68, was found by his housekeeper. An autopsy showed he had been stabbed to death.

Teen Who Murdered Gay, Elderly, Jewish Man Also Used Steroids According to Newspaper (2013): Bleddyn King targeted gay, 63-year old Jewish man for robbery and murder. He killed the elderly man's cat, stabbed the victim multiple times and filmed himself with his mobile phone as he stomped on the dead man's head while yelling obscenities. King was  nineteen years old when he contacted and arranged to meet widower David Evans on January 26, 2012. King had agreed to meet Evans after corresponding with him on a gay internet dating website. - Steroid-taking teenager who killed elderly man fails in bid to cut jail term (2013): Lord Justice Treacy told the court King - who was 'obsessed' with his physical appearance and took steroids - was in financial difficulty and planned to steal from Mr Evans after contacting him through a gay dating website. Armed with a knife, and with murder in mind, he went to the victim's bungalow in Pentyrch, near Cardiff, at about 8pm on January 26 last year and killed him. The judge said the victim's face was 'virtually unrecognisable' and he had suffered multiple fractures and dozens of stab wounds. After killing the 'slightly-built' widower, who was said to have been 'a bit of a lost soul' since the death of his wife in 2008, King filmed himself on his mobile phone as he repeatedly stamped on the dead victim's face and shouted obscenities. He then loaded several of the victim's possessions into his car and set fire to his house before driving away in the stolen car.

Police hunt South African connected with murder of elderly gay Scot (2012): Detectives release photo of man wanted in connection with murder of Michael Polding, who was found dead in his flat in Brighton, England. - Michael Polding death: Website to help trace Ricardo Pisano (2012): A website to assist Sussex Police in tracing a suspect being sought over the unsolved murder of a Brighton man has been set up by the force. - Ricardo Pisano arrested for the murder of his gay lover (2013): A man who escaped from a New Zealand prison nearly 12 years ago has been arrested by British police for the murder of his gay lover. Ricardo Pisano, also known as Brandon Victor Pillay, who was once dubbed the "Artful Dodger", walked out of Rangipo Prison near Turangi in August 2001 while serving a 15-month sentence for extortion. He was never recaptured. - Brit Jason Peter Marshall accused of killing elderly gay Italian man he met online and trying to kill another (2013): A 23-year-old British man was arrested in Italy for allegedly murdering a 68-year-old man and trying to kill another. Jason Peter Marshall, from Greenwich, south-east London, is accused of strangling tour guide Vincenzo lale to death in an apartment in Rome. Reports say Marshall, who was arrested Friday night, traveled to Italy last month after meeting his victims in a gay online chat room.

Male model charged with murder of Portuguese journalist found castrated in New York (2011):  Carlos Castro, 65, was a high-profile television journalist in Portugal and an outspoken gay rights campaigner. Police believe that the pair had dated for several months, although Mr Seabra's family insist he is not homosexual. Renato Seabra, 21, was charged with one count of second degree murder and is being held at New York's Bellevue psychiatric hospital pending a possible court appearance. - Gay Activist Slain, Castrated in N.Y.C. Hotel (2011). - Model Admits He Killed Boyfriend and Wore His Testicles on His Wrists (2012).

Even after death, abuse against gays continues (2010, Senegal): Even death cannot stop the violence against gays in this corner of the world any more. Madieye Diallo's body had only been in the ground for a few hours when the mob descended on the weedy cemetery with shovels. They yanked out the corpse, spit on its torso, dragged it away and dumped it in front of the home of his elderly parents. The scene of May 2, 2009 was filmed on a cell phone and the video sold at the market. It passed from phone to phone, sowing panic among gay men who say they now feel like hunted animals.

Morrow, Deana F (2001). Older Gays and Lesbians: Surviving a Generation of Hate and Violence. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 13(1/2): 151-169. PDF Download. This article discusses the impact that coming of age in the Pre-Stonewall era has had on older gays and lesbians. Anti-gay hate and violence, within a historical context of homophobia and heterosexism, are examined. Risk factors, as well as coping capacities, for older lesbians and gays are explored. Research on the psychological adjustment and well-being of older gays and lesbians is reviewed, and suggestions for intervention with this population are proposed... Studies have also shown that the emotional and psychological consequences of enduring a lifetime of hate and violence can be exhausting. Outcomes reported in the literature include depression, anxiety, anger, and symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (Barnes, 1994; Herek, Gillis, & Cogan, 1997); hiding one’s lesbian or gay orientation in order to avoid harm (Cook-Daniels, 1997; Herek, 1989); and relocation to minimize the likelihood of becoming a target for violence (Barnes, 1994).

Cook-Daniels L (1998). Lesbian, Gay Male, Bisexual and Transgendered Elders: Elder Abuse and Neglect Issues. Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect, 9(2): 35-49. Abstract. Full Text. Full TextPDF Download. Unfortunately, due in large measure to our society's still-pervasive social prejudice against and ignorance about sexual orientation and gender minorities, there have been few studies of this population of elders, and virtually no one has examined how this population's culture affects its experience with elder abuse. This paper is thus only a beginning, speculative venture into this realm. It is based primarily on my personal knowledge of Lesbian and Gay male elders and younger transgendered persons and on my discussions with social workers serving older Lesbians and Gay men and with domestic violence specialists serving older women or Lesbians, Gay men, and transgendered persons... Given how much prejudice and violence Lesbian, Gay male, and transgendered elders face, there can be no question that any given APS caseload will include such elders. These clients are likely to be more resistant than other clients to accepting services, due to their fears of being victimized or ridiculed again and of losing especially-valued independence and privacy. When APS workers become more aware of the existence and circumstances of Lesbian, Gay male, and transgendered elders, they should be better able to build rapport with these clients and assist them in getting the services and assistance they need. - Elder abuse carries specific dangers for Gays (1998, Washington Blade): Unfortunately, service providers’ ignorance of the existence of LGBT elders makes it doubly hard for elders who do want help to get respectful and appropriate treatment. Although many of those who work with elders are themselves members of our community, not all of them are willing or able to educate their professional colleagues. Indeed, one workshop panelist’s boss asked her to pay most of her own expenses to the conference and present herself as an independent consultant to avoid associating her employer with the topic. If the professionals serving elders are unwilling to talk with their peers about LGBT aging issues, it’s hard to imagine they are sensitively talking to their LGBT clients about the violence and discrimination they may be suffering at home, and how it can be alleviated.


To "The SEARCH Section" For The Best Search Engines & Information Directories, The Searchable Sites to Locate Papers & Abstracts... and The Sites - Some Searchable - Where "Free Papers" Are Available!
 

Health

Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Issues and Research Gaps and Opportunities; Board on the Health of Select Populations; Institute of Medicine (2011). The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding. The National Academic Press. Full Text & PDF Download. Full Text & PDF Download. Later Adulthood: PDF Download. PDF Download. - Older Lesbians, Gays Have Higher Rates of Chronic Disease, Mental Distress, Isolation (2011): Members of California's aging lesbian, gay and bisexual population are more likely to suffer from certain chronic conditions, even as they wrestle with the challenges of living alone in far higher numbers than the heterosexual population, according to new policy brief from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Half of all gay and bisexual adult men in California between the ages of 50 and 70 are living alone, compared with 13.4 percent of heterosexual men in the same age group. And although older California lesbians and bisexual women are more likely to live with a partner or a family member than their male counterparts, more than one in four live alone, compared with one in five heterosexual women... The policy brief, "The Health of Aging Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Adults in California," [Abstract. PDF Download] includes the first data published on aging LGB adults based on a large statewide population. And among a population whose health needs are too often associated only with HIV and AIDS, the study offers the first insights about broader health conditions and trends.

Workshop on aging covers LGBT sexual expression and long-term care (2013): Same-sex intimacy and long-term care were among the topics addressed in "Sexual Expression, Older Adults and Long-Term Care Settings," an LGBT-related forum held during the American Society on Aging's 2013 Aging in America Conference, held recently at the Hyatt Regency Chicago... Among the many other LGBT-related workshops at the conference were "The Other Side of 40: Gay Men and Ageism," "Religious Affiliation and Successful Aging Among Transgender Older Adults" and "Health Enablers, Minority Stress and Coping: Midlife and Older Gay Men's Mental and Physical Health."

Mollon, Lea (2012). The Forgotten Minorities: Health Disparities of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Communities. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 23(1): 1-6. PDF Download.

Cook-Daniels L (2008). Aging as Ourselves: LGBT Aging Health Issues for Health Care Providers. PDF Download. About this document: This document contains only the narrative script and citations for a multi-part, multimedia, online curricula for health care providers that includes PowerPoint slides, narration, role-plays, quizzes, assignments, etc... There are 13 modules in this course. The first module is the one we’re in, course introduction and overview. The topics we’ve covered include lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people and the health care profession; how this course will help you and your patients; and how the course is constructed...

Lum J, Hawkins L (2011). Informal Caregiving and LGBT Communities. In Focus. PDF Download. This In Focus, the third in our Informal Caregiving series, looks at the challenges of providing informal care for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transsexual/ transgendered populations... Why focus on informal caregivers and the LGBT community? Informal caregivers within LGBT communities may be friends, neighbours, family members or members of a person’s “family of choice” (See glossary). They may include: • LGBT caregivers caring for older LGBT friends or relatives (e.g., spouse of friend of an older person); • LGBT caregivers caring for heterosexual older people (e.g., LGBT adult children caring for parents); • Heterosexual caregivers caring for LGBT relatives or friends. Each group will have differences in approaches to care but will need support from the LGBT community...  Challenge homophobia and heterosexism among health and social care systems and providers: Informal caregiving is rarely provided in isolation, but rather as part of a greater network of care that includes professional healthcare providers, staff in hospitals and long term care facilities, home care personnel and personal support workers. Homophobia is one of the greatest barriers that informal caregivers within the LGBT community encounter as they and their care recipients attempt to access services (Brotman & Ryan, 2008). With few exceptions, hetero-centred principles frame most policies and practices within mainstream health and social service agencies. For example, hetero images and terms such as husband/wife convey a lack of understanding and acceptance of alternate sexual orientations and identities. As a consequence, older LGBT people and their carers may hesitate to seek needed professional care, supportive services or even respite due to long-standing experiences of discomfort, homophobia and discrimination. In the end, avoiding additional supportive services or specialized care negatively affects a person’s quality of life (Brotman, et al., 2007).

Aging in Indiana – What professionals [service providers] should know about LGBT aging (2013): Older adults who are lesbian, gay, bi-sexual or transgender face many of the same physical, psychological and social challenges of aging that heterosexual seniors face. However, LGBT aging also brings with it some unique challenges. The University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community asked Kathleen Sullivan, director of senior services at the L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center in Los Angeles, California, and Glorianne Leck, a member of the LGBT Aging & Caring Network in Monroe County, Indiana, to share their thoughts on the topic...  A third issue involves our not having legal rights to pass on property and or pensions and social security benefits to our chosen partners.  CAC: What can aging services providers do to help relieve these issues?  Sullivan: Getting trained is the number one thing people can do. Learn the differences, experiences and how you can create safe space for LGBT seniors. When these seniors are afforded environments that are accepting and safe, stress and feelings of isolation can be reduced.  Leck: First, all staff and service providers need to be sensitized to the issues and commit to treat LGBT adults with dignity and respect. Staff and service providers need to know of our special needs and the issues that effect our well being. Second, whenever possible our identity should be regarded and our preferences for LGBT or, at least, same sex service providers ought to be considered.   CAC: Are there best practice when it comes to meeting the needs of LGBT older adults?   Sullivan: No one has done this research, are you game?   CAC: What are the barriers to the implementation of these practices?   Sullivan: Well, not having definitive information is the biggest barrier. Additionally, heterosexism (discrimination by heterosexuals agains homosexuals) continues to be a problem that seniors face. ...

Anderson KJ (2011). Grey and Gay: A Brief Discussion of Determinants of Heal and Health Disparities of LGBT Elders. PPT Presentation.  PPT Download. Broad Recommendations for Change: Increase funding for and provision of LGBT Elder Programs.   Provide Immediate Access to Volunteer-Based Care.   Provide Education, Tools, and Legal Services to LGBT Elders.   Create and Support Advocacy Infrastructure.   Build a Strong Coalition of Allies.   Advocate for Greater  Research on LGBT Older Adults.   Create a National Public Discussion about LGBT Aging Issues. - Alzheimer's Society (2013, Fact Sheet, UK). Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual people with dementia.

Williams, Mark Edward (2012). Same-Sex Partnerships and the Health of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Older Adults. PhD. Dissertation, University of Washington. PDF Download. Download Page. While extensive research has examined associations between marriage, cohabitation and the health of heterosexual adults, it remains unclear whether similar patterns of health are associated with the same-sex partnerships for older adults. The following papers examine how having a same-sex partner may be related to general self-reported health, mental health, and satisfaction with life for older adults. Analyzing survey data collected from lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults 50 years of age and older, the first paper reports findings that those with same-sex partners have significantly better self-reported health, fewer depressive symptoms, less perceived stress, and greater life satisfaction, controlling for gender, age, education, income, sexuality, and relationship duration. Relationship duration did not significantly impact the association between partnership status and health, nor did gender. The importance of culturally sensitive clinical practice and policies that recognize the role that same-sex partnerships may play in older adult health are discussed along with implications for future research. The second paper further examines how identifying as married is associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms and greater life satisfaction compared to those identifying as unmarried partners, but not significantly less perceived stress. Social integration, as reflected in increasing access to and identification with marriage by LGB older adults, is an important area for future research to examine in order to study how changing social acceptance of sexual minorities may impact older adult health. The final paper reviews the theoretical frameworks that have been employed to study lesbian, gay, and bisexual older adult health. Social determinants of health models are contrasted with social constructionist and post-structural critiques of gender, sexuality, age and health. Future research needs to envision both structural sources of health disparities as well as account for individual agency and the resilient subject as important elements for theorizing the source and meaning of health disparities for lesbian, gay and bisexual older adults.
 
The Merck Manual of Geriatrics (Chapter 114; Sexuality) [Note: The new version of the Merk Manual does not have a sexuality section, but there is an intimacy section]:
"Many elderly homosexual persons have not publicly revealed their sexual preference. Although their relationships and sexual problems are generally similar to those of heterosexual persons, homosexual persons may experience additional stress due to a perceived need to hide their sexual orientation. Those who are institutionalized may be particularly vulnerable to loneliness and isolation. Gay-oriented long-term care facilities are virtually nonexistent." - Discrimination Threatens Elderly Gay Men's Health Care (2003): A study published in the April 2003 issue of The Gerontologist found that older gay men and lesbians often mistrust the health and social service networks as a result of life-long experiences of marginalization and oppression. "Many gay and lesbian elders who experienced the pervasive social stigma that existed prior to the advent of gay liberation movement maintain a sense of extreme caution with respect to whether or not societal attitudes have really changed," according to the authors of the study, Shari Brotman, Bill Ryan and Robert Cormier of the McGill School of Social Work. - Fear Haunts Gay, Lesbian Seniors, Study Reveals: Prevents Homosexuals From Accessing Health-Care Services (2006): There are many seniors who have good relationships with their health-care providers, Brotman said. But "we have to pay attention to those who don't." The study calls for increased training within the health-care sector and greater effort to reach out to gay and lesbian seniors. - Social Networks, Gay Men, and Aging (2006): Results from the first large-scale study of caregiving in the gay and lesbian communities in New York challenge the myth of the isolated aging gay man. - LGBT Frail Older Adults: How aging affects LGBT older adults differently (2013).
 
National Conference on Aging to feature sessions on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults (2006): The Joint Conference of the American Society on Aging (ASA) and the National Council on the Aging (NCOA) - taking place March 16-19, 2006, at the Anaheim Marriott Hotel in Anaheim, Calif. - will include an array of sessions addressing the concerns of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people ages 50-plus and of the agencies and professionals serving them. In addition, a number of events are planned for the Lesbian and Gay Aging Issues Network (LGAIN), one of ASA’s eight constituent groups... More than 20 Joint Conference presentations will deal with LGBT aging, with a focus on such topics as housing options; advocacy, law and public policy; health and mental health concerns; elder abuse and neglect; spirituality; and cultural competence for service providers. - Unmet mental health and substance abuse treatment needs of sexual minority elders (2012): In a survey exploring the reliability and validity of a screening tool, we explored the substance abuse and mental health issues among 371 elders; 74 were sexual minorities. Analyses by age group indicated that elders 55-64 years had significantly more problems with substance abuse, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts compared to those 65 and older. Bisexuals reported significantly greater problems with depression, anxiety, and suicidality than either heterosexual or lesbian or gay elders. Mental health and substance abuse treatment utilization was low among all elders with problems. Implications for assessment, access to care, and group-specific services delivery are discussed. 

Mental health issues in gay and lesbian aging Conference, Dec. 1998, The Washington School of Psychiatry, Washington, D.C.: The Center for the Study of Psychotherapies for the Aging of the Washington School of Psychiatry presents a conference on Mental Health Issues in Gay and Lesbian Aging. Participants are invited to examine the meaning of aging in gay and lesbian life by: 1. learning how practitioners and agency programs can respond to the special needs of lesbian and gay elders; 2. exploring the topic of countertransference and sexual orientation; 3. and gaining an understanding of the history of mental health with this population.  - Seniors Active in a Gay Environment (SAGE): Conference, May, 1998: The conference aims to: heighten awareness of gay and lesbian aging issues within the gay and non-gay communities; vigorously debate the causes, effects, and potential solutions for ageism and age-phobia in the gay community; identify strategies for bringing gay and lesbian elderly fully into the gay community's family portrait; showcase innovative outreach, support and service programs for aging gays and lesbians. - SAGE, USA. - SAGE conference addresses joys, challenges faced by gay seniors (2000):  "There aren’t a lot of images of old people in our community," Kaelber said. "And ones that do exist are conflicting for seniors: We kind of fall into the societal precept that the old are decrepit, are society’s throwaways - the predatory older man that seems to take a long time to die away." But for a while in early May, all of that changed, when more than 600 gay seniors gathered in New York at Fordham University’s Lincoln Center campus to participate in the second national conference organized by SAGE.  - Gay Seniors Conference Draws Attention to a Hidden Population (2000): On May 5 and 6, Senior Action in a Gay Environment (SAGE) will focus national attention on one of the most hidden and under-served populations of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) seniors.  - Health: Groups team up to aid older gays: Callen-Lorde, Pride Senior Network join forces to launch the Pride Aging Resource Center N/A (2000). - XAdaptation and Age-Related Expectations of Older Gay and Lesbian Adults (1992) (Abstract): Results from a study of lesbian women and gay men in the Midwest over the age of 50, who indicate high levels of involvement in the gay community, provide a picture of the aging process of these adults that builds on previous research efforts. Respondents reported acceptance of the aging process, and high levels of life satisfaction, despite predictable problems associated with aging and sexual orientation. Being active in the gay community was an asset to accepting one's own aging.

Chicago Holds Forum on LGBT Substance Use Among Seniors (2006): Over 30 professionals from healthcare, counseling or social service providers attended a March 17 round-table discussion on substance use held by the Chicago Task Force on LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) Aging, the Windy City Times reported on March 29... Research specifically targeting the aging LGBT population is underfunded, despite a lack of specific knowledge about this patient group and the multiple barriers to care it experiences, according to Kenis Williams of the Haymarket Center. Existing training textbooks contain only very brief sections on health issues specific to the LGBT population and offer no information on substance use among the senior LGBT community.  - Health Issues Affecting Older Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual People in the UK: A Policy Brief (2008, PDF Download.):  There is very little that is known about the health outcomes and health care needs of older LGB people in the UK and how they differ from those of their heterosexual peers or younger LGB people. Most of the research that is done on health issues and LGB people does not distinguish between young and old. Stigma and discrimination that is experienced across the lifecourse is likely to have a detrimental effect on health in later life, but there is no research evidence documenting this. More research in this area is needed.

Older LGBT Substance Abuse Issues: Are They at Higher Risk for Substance Abuse? (2002, PDF Document: Powerpoint Presentation): The general population data informs us of where we need to go with future research, which can inform effective interventions. We cannot assume that the older LGBT community has the same risk factors associated with the general population. - Alcohol & Seniors: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Older Adults. - Alcohol and Seniors: Alcohol Dependence and Misuse among Older Gay and Lesbian People - Aging in Canada (2006): It is important to point out at the outset that we do not know a lot about alcohol dependence and misuse among older people who are lesbian or gay, in part because we don’t know that much about the problem in the younger people. There are a lot of myths, stereotypes and misconceptions in this area.

Davidson, Darcy (2001). Issues Facing Elderly Gay Men and Lesbians. Full Text. PDF Download. The purpose of this bibliography is to examine the unique issues facing the elderly gay men and lesbian population. Because the laws of the US do not recognize their living situations with a same-sex partner, more thought and planning is needed to even attempt to put them on the same footing as heterosexual elderly. This paper will explore the unique legal, social, and economic issues facing the gay and lesbian elderly. There are a few limitations with the scope of the research. First, to get a fairly current perspectives on the aging issues, the farthest back the research extends is to 1985. Therefore, this paper covers sources from 1985 to 2000. Next, the research is limited to those sources that dealt with the United States of America. It does not include sources written about elderly gays and lesbians from other countries. The reason for this is a lot of the unique challenges facing elderly gay and lesbians arise from the laws of the United States not recognizing and affording protection to the same-sex relationship.

Chicago Task Force on LGBT Aging (2003). LGBT Persons in Chicago: Growing Older: A Survey of Needs and Perceptions. PDF Download. Survey respondents identified a number of barriers to receiving appropriate care from both health care and social service providers that were specific to their sexual orientation and/or gender identity. Among these were the need for education among professionals regarding the extent to which unconscious or implied heterosexism (i.e., the presumption of heterosexuality) is a barrier to open communication between providers and LGBT clients/patients regarding lifestyle and health issues. Findings suggest that health and service professionals often fail to recognize or acknowledge the significance of primary relationships that are like spousal relationships in a legal heterosexual marriage, and that networks of friends often function as extended family for LGBT seniors.

LGBT Seniors Internship at Barbary Lane (2006, PDF Download N/A, Pacific Institute): "Through the Pacific Institute’s comprehensive educational programming we train licensed health professionals in the fields of mental health, social work, gerontology, nursing, and residential care administration for the elderly..." - Pacific Institute: In the next 10 years, Pacific Institute will help in changing the paradigm for teaching and learning how to care for the elderly and people with chronic mental health issues from a humanistic, process-oriented perspective...  Clinical Internship & Research (2013): The Clinical Supervisor manages intern supervision and oversees all resident issues of a clinical nature. He/she is a licensed professional in the State of California and meets current supervisory requirements. The Assistant and/or Clinical Director is the interns' primary administrative contact. He/she coordinates all aspects of interns' presence in the practicum-site facility, including orientation, logistical concerns, and any other issues of a non-clinical nature.

SAGE USA (2012). Inclusive Services for LGBT Older Adults: A Practical Guide To Creating Welcoming Agencies. PDF Download.

Makadon HJ (2012). Health Care and Human Rights for LGBT People: A  Critical Focus for Our Work. Making Life Healthier: A Publication of the Fenway Institute, Boston, MA. Full Text.

Diehl, Brian (2013). LGBT Aging and Elder Care. Honors Dissertation, Social Work, Bridgewater State University. PDF Download.This project focuses on particular issues faced by elderly lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered (LGBT) people. This qualitative study involves interviews with eight gay men, four lesbians and two service providers and seeks to understand the unique challenges confronting aging members of the LGBT community and the quality of training received by caregivers assisting this population. Interview participants included three couples and four single men, and two partnered individuals across Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Analysis of the data indicates that the areas of greatest concern to LGBT elders are social-support networks and broader social change. Individuals interviewed expressed concern about maintaining local connections or receiving support within the direct community, while couples were primarily concerned with legal rights on a federal level, such as spousal benefits and pension transference. Services providers expressed concern about understaffed agencies, a void in LGBT elder training and lack of agency support in meeting the needs of this minority group. Aging members of the LGBT community who have faced stigmatism, discrimination or marginalization throughout their life would benefit from an environment that supports diversity and institutional changes designed to meet their distinctive needs. Policy-makers interested in equal protection, eldercare advocates or diversity awareness groups could utilize these findings.

MacGabbann P (2012?). Promoting the Sexual Health of Older People. Journal of Nursing. Full Text. This paper examines the issue of sexual health and older people. It identifies sexual health in this population group as a component of health that is often overlooked. As a practitioner of Gerontological Nursing, the author seeks to determine why this is and what can be done about promoting sexual health for this population group. Initially health promotion and sexuality are defined before outlining the rationale for the choice of this topic. Incorporated into the discussion is the acknowledgement that this is an area requiring significant development for all older people, regardless of sexual orientation, that in fact the need for health promotion for older gay and lesbian people may be a more pressing issue overall. Having outlined the need for health promotion, a number of strategies are introduced. Relatively little research into this specific issue has been conducted thus health promotion strategies in more broad terms are discussed.

Enum Y, et al. (2009). Older People’s Mental Health Needs Assessment For Depression, Dementia and Severe Mental Illness (Draft). East London NHS Foundation and NHS Tower Hanlets. PDF Download. PDF Download. Anecdotal evidence suggests that there are a number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans Older People (OLGBT) in Tower Hamlets. There is currently no data but research carried out on behalf of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets recommends that staff are aware of different sexual orientations and that service provision is sensitive to the needs of the service user6. This research recommends a number of actions including looking at current service provision for OLGBT, and developing gay friendly policy and practice. 

Hughes M (2007). Older lesbians and gays accessing health and aged-care services. Australian Social Work, 60(2): 197-209. PDF Download.  This paper examines older lesbian and gay people’s experiences of and expectations for the delivery of health and aged care services. In-depth narrative interviews were conducted with older gays and lesbians in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney. Data were analysed by identifying evaluative statements within specific narratives and grouping these statements into themes. Participants reflected on the meaning of their sexual identity and how they would like it to be acknowledged when in contact with health and aged care service providers. In addition to direct discrimination, participants reported a more indirect form of discrimination in providers’ assumption of heterosexuality among clients and their failure to provide lesbian- or gay-friendly services. The findings highlight the need for health and aged care services to better understand and acknowledge older gay and lesbian people’s sexual identities to enable improved access to services in the future.

Gay, Lesbian Older Adults Face Adversity, Depression (2011):  LGBT adults were also more likely to binge-drink and smoke than heterosexuals of similar ages. "The higher rates of aging and health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender older adults is a major concern for public health," study researcher Karen Fredriksen-Goldsen, director of the University of Washington's Institute for Multigenerational Health, said in a statement...  The team surveyed 2,560 LGBT adults ages 50 to 95 from across the U.S. and found that many of the subjects' unique circumstances lead to physical and mental distress, with nearly four out of 10 participants asserting that they had considered suicide at some point.In addition, 47 percent of respondents reported a disability, 31 percent reported depression and 53 percent reported loneliness. The participants were less likely to be married or partnered than heterosexuals, which may result in less social support and financial security as they age, according to the researchers. The study authors note that LGBT adults were more likely to live alone, and because they may not have children to help them, and are at a greater risk for social isolation, which is "linked to poor mental and physical health, cognitive impairment, chronic illness and premature death," Fredriksen-Goldsen said. The study also revealed that 80 percent of the participants had been victimized and discriminated against because of their sexual orientation or gender identity — incidents that may contribute to their poor health, according to the researchers. For example, 21 percent of respondents said they were fired from a job because of their perceived sexual orientation or gender identity.

Fredriksen-Goldsen KI, et al. (2011). The Aging and Health Report: Disparities and Resilience among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults.  PDF Download. Executive Summary: PDF Download. About 31% of LGBT older adult partici-pants have depressive symptoms at a clinical level (measured using the CESD-10, with a cut-off point of 10; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale). Among LGBT older adults, the prevalence of depression by each specific group is as follows: 27% of lesbians, 35% of bisexual women, 29% of gay men, 36% of bisexual men, and 48% of trans-gender older adults... Almost one-quarter of the LGBT older adults in the pro-ject (24%) have been told by a doctor that they have anxiety, including 22% of lesbians, 34% of bisexual women, 22% of gay men, 24% of bisexual men, and 39% of transgender older adults..  Thirty-nine percent of LGBT older adults in the project have seriously thought of taking their own lives at some point, including 35% of lesbians, 40% of bisexual women, 37% of gay men, 39% of bisexual men, and 71% of transgender older adults. Among those who have contemplated suicide, 39% report that their suicidal thoughts were related to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Lesbian and bisexual women and gay and bisexual men are similar in terms of suicidal ideation. Transgender older adults are more likely to have contemplated suicide than non-transgender older adults, regardless of socio-demographic differences...  LGBT older adult participants with HIV disease report poorer general mental health on average (64.5) than those who are HIV negative (71.4). Those with HIV disease are significantly more likely to have depres-sion (40 % vs. 30% respectively), anxiety (35% vs. 22%), and to have contemplated suicide (49% vs. 38%) compared with those who are HIV negative. Differences in general mental health, anxiety, and suicidal ideation remain significant after accounting for age, income, and education... Loneliness and social isolation can lead to negative health consequences. Among LGBT older adults in the project, 59% feel that they lack companionship, 53% feel isolated from others, and 53% feel left out.

Fredriksen-Goldsen K, Kim H-J, Goldsen J, Hoy-Ellis CP, Emlet CA, Erosheva EA, Muraco A (2013). LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Health, Risks, and Resilience - Findings from Caring and Aging with Pride. Report prepared for the LGBT Aging Policy Task Force, San Franciscon, CA. Seattle, Washington: Institute for Multigenerational Health, University of Washington. PDF Download.This report provides an initial snapshot of the 295 participants from Caring and Aging with Pride residing in San Francisco. The findings reported here are preliminary given the limited sample size, especially for transgender and bisexual older adults and older adults from specific racial and ethnic communities. The goal of the report is to provide information that will aid in the development of a community-based survey of the aging needs of culturally diverse LGBT older adults in San Francisco. This report is organized into the following sections: Background Characteristics, Physical Health, Mental Health, Resilience, Risks, Healthcare Access, and Services and Programs. At the beginning of each section we provide some preliminary comparisons of San Francisco’s LGBT older adult participants to older adults in San Francisco’s general population and to LGBT older adult participants across the nation. These comparisons are followed by a descriptive analysis of San Francisco’s LGBT older adult participants.

Social Care Institute for Excellence, Consortium of LGBT Voluntary and Community Organisations (2011, UK). At a glance 42: Personalisation briefing: Implications for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered (LGBT) people. PDF Download. This At a glance briefing explores what personalisation means for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered (LGBT) people. It looks at some of the main issues and examples of good practice. Social care commissioners and providers don’t often think about LGBT people when planning and delivering services, but this does not mean that LGBT people are not using services or do not want to use services. There may be a lack of visibility because LGBT people do not feel comfortable being open about themselves and may fear discrimination.

The potential impact of discrimination fears of older gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgender individuals living in small- to moderate-sized cities on long-term health care (2008): As an exploration of the potential impact of fears of discrimination against GLBTs in long-term health care settings, this study compared perceptions of GLBT persons and heterosexuals. A total of 132 GLBT persons and 187 heterosexuals living in Eastern Washington completed a survey that contained demographic questions and perceptions of discrimination in long-term care settings. Most respondents suspected that staff and residents of care facilities discriminate against GLBTs. GLBT respondents who believed that residents of care facilities are victims of discrimination were more likely to believe that they would have to hide their sexual orientation if admitted to a care facility. GLBT respondents were more likely than heterosexual respondents to believe that GLBTs do not have equal access to health care and social services, that GLBTs residents of care facilities are victims of discrimination, that GLBT sensitivity training programs would benefit staff and residents of care facilities, and that GLBT retirement facilities would be a positive development for older GLBTs. This study is offered as a preliminary investigation of concerns about GLBT discrimination in health care settings, how concerns are expressed, and the implications of those concerns for health care needs.

Fenge L-E, Hicks C (2011). Hidden lives: the importance of recognising the needs and experiences of older lesbians and gay men within healthcare practice. Diversity in Health and Care, 8: 147–154. PDF Download. If they are to meet the diverse needs of the ageing population, healthcare practitioners require a greater understanding of the experiences of older lesbians and gay men. The provision of respectful, compassionate, accessible healthcare is as important to them as it is to anyone else. However, to date only a limited number of studies of older lesbians and gay men have been undertaken in the UK, and therefore their experiences and needs have remained largely hidden. This paper reports on the findings of a participative research project, involving older lesbians and gay men, which was one of the first to use this methodology within the UK. Key themes include issues of ‘coming out’ and concerns about heterosexism in care. These are discussed in terms of the need to adopt a more person-centred approach within healthcare that promotes an emphasis on valuing individual identity and diversity.

Blank TO, et al. (2009). Gay Men's Knowledge and Attitudes about the Prostate and Prostate Cancer. PPT Presentation, 30th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions, Society of Behavioral Medicine, Montreal. PDF DownloadSummary of Findings: Basic lack of knowledge of risk, screening, prostate issues, and treatment effects. - Clear role of sexual identity and masculinity with regards to issues of prostate cancer and treatment. Commonality of all men: “Cancer is cancer!” Specificity of gay and bisexual men.  Perceived interconnections of aging and impacts. - - - Future Research and Policy: Broaden scope and encompass views other than heteronormative/ marriage-centric model... Sexuality... Relationship status. Transgender status. Need for materials specific to GBT community. Address ageism in the gay community.

Johnston, Angela (2008). Exploring the Health Needs of Older Lesbians and Gay Men in Metro Vancouver. Master's Dissertation, Department of Gerontology, Simon Frazer University. PDF Download. Download Page. Gerontological research examining the lives of older lesbian and gay adults is limited. The unique health needs of this sub-population remains unclear. This research addresses this gap by exploring the following research questions: 1) What are the specific health needs of older lesbian and gay adults? 2) How are the specific needs of older lesbian and gay adults unmet? and 3) How can healthcare agencies better address the needs of older lesbian and gay adults? This study is guided by a feminist/queer perspective synthesized with an ecological framework. In depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 individuals aged 50+ who reside in Metro Vancouver. Participants self-identified as either lesbian or gay and reported at least one chronic health condition. The findings of this research can be used to increase equitable health service delivery, inform policy development and resource allocation, as well as provide a foundation for critical health research.

Kaplan BJ (2002). Gay Elders Face Uncomfortable Realities in LTC. Caring For The Ages, 3(11). Full Text. Full Text. By the year 2030, there will be four million gay elders in the United States, according to the Policy Institute of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force (NGLTF) in New York City. These gay elders, like gay people of all ages, live in a social environment dominated by heterosexism, to which they accommodate with varying degrees of frustration and satisfaction, dependence and independence, according to Policy Institute Director Sean Cahill, PhD, who is also coauthor of Outing Age: Public Policy Issues Affecting Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Elders. As gay people grow older, however, they--like their heterosexual counterparts--are compelled to rely more and more on public programs and social services for care and assistance, Dr. Cahill said in an interview. This often means more frustration and less independence from heterosexist institutions. In addition--and more pernicious--is the fear of experiencing discrimination and depending on strangers, because gay elders are less likely to have children and may even be estranged from their families due to homophobia or fear of rejection.

Kaplan BJ (2002). LTC Staff Sensitized to Needs of Gay Elders. Caring For The Ages, 3(12). Full Text. Full Text. Part One of this series (see "Gay Elders Face Uncomfortable Realities in LTC" in the November 2002 issue of Caring, p. 1) showed how lack of information about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) seniors is fed by heterosexist assumptions, staff difficulties in dealing with any kind of sexuality among seniors in long-term care, and unspoken homophobia. This creates an environment in which LGBT seniors often feel unwelcome--even in danger. Part Two looks at a new LTC staff training program that is dealing with these problems and helping to change the LTC facility culture. A recently launched collaborative effort between Senior Action in a Gay Environment (SAGE; (www.sageusa.org) and the Brookdale Center on Aging (www.brookdale.org) in New York City is providing much-needed training for LTC staff in the needs and care of LGBT residents.

American Medical Directors Association (2012): The Care of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans-Gender Persons in The Long-Term Care Setting: White Paper: Resolution A-12. Full Text. Given the history of social ostracism and lack of knowledge regarding their global biopsychosocial needs, particularly in comparison to other aging groups, LGBT elders have been rendered a largely invisible population. In light of advancing age, those considered among the “Greatest Generation”, “Stonewall Generation” and “Baby Boomers”, LGBT elders will require increasing involvement with physicians and institutions specializing in long term care. Of paramount importance, yet least well understood, the needs of advanced aged LGBT elders must be identified to facilitate culturally competent and appropriate care, as well as eliminate disparities in the long term care environment...  This White Paper briefly summarizes disparities faced by LGBT seniors and recommends that AMDA formulate policies of acceptance, equality and non-discrimination in keeping with societal evolution, federal laws, and ethical guidelines established by other professional organizations vested in the provision of long term care.  Such a policy takes into account the number of LGBT elders at risk, clinical considerations, reports of current inequities, regulatory concerns, and ethical imperatives.  Accordingly, it is suggested that AMDA advocate and support the following recommendations, divided by Clinical Practice and Policy, Education, and Research. While neither policy statement nor practice recommendations can quickly and easily effect pervasive individual, institutional or organizational culture change, advocacy for all elders, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identify, or other human attributes, supports the best interest and optimal practice of all long term care stakeholders.

Schilder AJ, Kennedy C, Goldstone IL, Ogden RD, Hogg RS, O'Shaughnessy MV (2001). "Being dealt with as a whole person." Care seeking and adherence: the benefits of culturally competent care. Social Science and Medicine, 52(11): 1643-1659. Abstract. PDF Download.The purpose of this study is to characterize the relationship between identity and health care experiences (including antiretroviral therapy utilization) among HIV-positive sexual minority males.This qualitative study used grounded theory with data collection occurring through focus groups and interviews.A questionnaire was used to complete a demographic profile.The study included 47 HIV positive participants from three minorities: gay men, bisexual men and transgendered persons, gender identifying as female and or living as women.Sessions elicited information on: (1) general experiences with health care, (2) experiences with HIV antiretroviral therapies and issues surrounding access, and (3) adherence to these therapies and identity in relation to health care.These textual data revealed three themes: (1) the importance of sexual identity and its social and cultural context, (2) the differences in the health concerns between the sexual minorities and (3) a wide spectrum of experiences with the health care system that provide information surrounding the access to and adequacy of health care.Successful health care providers are aware of different issues that may play a role in the provision of health care to these sexual minorities.Providers awareness of sexual and social identity and the related different cultural values, beliefs and custom enhance care seeking and therapeutic adherence. For sexual minorities, primary care remains the most important entry point into the health care system. Cultural competence of care providers can foster patient’s care seeking and adherence to treatment. NOTE: The same would aply for elderly gay, lesbian, bisexuxal and transgender persons, with related studies to be carried out.

Health Disparities Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Older Adults: The Results of a Population-Based Study (2012, Washington State):  Results Of the 51270 female respondents whose age were 50 and older, 477(0.99%) were lesbian and 245 (0.50%) were bisexual, and 50548 (98.51%) were heterosexual. Of the 32643 male respondents aged 50 and older, 396 (1.27%) were gay, 192 (0.51%) were bisexual, and 32055 (98.22%) were heterosexual. Among older adult women, lesbians were more likely to report current smoking (AOR=1.83; p<.001) and binge drinking (AOR=1.63; p<.05) than heterosexual women. Lesbians were also more likely to be obese (AOR=1.41; p<.01) and disabled (AOR=1.45; p<.01) than heterosexual women. Bisexual women showed higher prevalence rates of life-time asthma (AOR=1.67; p<.01) and disability (AOR=1.56; p<.05) than heterosexual women. Among older adult men, gay men showed higher prevalence rates of current smoking (AOR=1.42; p<.05), poor physical health (AOR=1.47; p<.05), and mental distress (AOR=2.14; p<.001) than heterosexual men; bisexual men showed higher prevalence rates of disability (AOR=1.88; p<.01)... Conclusions and implications: We observed similar and dissimilar health disparity patterns among older adult lesbians, gay men, and bisexual women and men. Culturally tailored interventions that respond to unique health-related needs of sexual minority sub-groups need to be developed. In addition, future research needs to further investigate what risk and protective factors are associated with such disparities among sexual minority older adults.

Integrating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults into Aging Policy and Practice (Public Policy and Aging Report - by the National Academy on an Aging Society, 21(3), 2011, PDF Download): Contents: 3 Resilience and Disparities among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults. - 8 The Diverse Elders Coalition and LGBT Aging: Connecting Communities, Issues, and Resources in a Historic Moment. - 12 Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults. - 14 Reflections on Advancing an LGBT Aging Agenda. - 19 How Health Care Reform Will Help LGBT Elders. - 24 Safe Spaces? The Need for LGBT Cultural Competency in Aging Services. - 28 Bridging the Service Gap: LGBT Older Adults, Public-Private Partnerships and Program Innovation. - 30 The Policy Issues and Social Concerns Facing Older Adults with HIV. - 34 LGBT Aging: Research and Policy Directions

Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Issues and Research Gaps and Opportunities; Board on the Health of Select Populations; Institute of Medicine (2011). The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding. The National Academic Press. Full Text & PDF Download. Full Text & PDF Download. Later Adulthood: PDF Download. PDF Download.

One Objective of the 2003 GMHS (Gay Men's Health Summit): "To rivet public attention to the health and wellness of middle-age and old gay men of all colors, classes, and ethnicities and support the creation of various local and national projects designed to meet the needs of these men." - Older lesbians and gay men's rights neglected shows Age Concern research (2002): The leading older people's charity has called on the public and voluntary sectors to recognise the needs of older lesbians and gay men as the UK population ages. Age Concern issues the challenge to recognise the diversity of an ageing population on the day of its ground-breaking Opening Doors conference held on Tuesday 30 April at the Victoria Park Plaza Hotel, London SW1. The charity has published a report, ahead of its conference, which shows older lesbians and gay men have remained invisible because many organisations have failed to investigate their needs. Many older lesbians and gay men can face discrimination caused by lack of legal recognition of their relationships, in terms of pensions, tenancy rights and next of kin arrangements. This can be coupled with the loneliness, ill health and financial issues that all older people can face. - Gay and lesbian seniors face health quandary: study (2006):  The McGill School of Social Work conducted the study on the treatment of gay and lesbian seniors by health care providers and others between 2003 and January of this year. The report, released Tuesday, was based on 90 interviews with seniors, their caregivers and their health care workers in three urban centres -- Vancouver, Montreal and Halifax. What it found was somewhat shocking. 

Working With Older Lesbians and Gay Men (1997): All of us, whether we are gay or non-gay professionals, need to examine our attitudes about working with older lesbian and gay male clients. Non-gay professionals should not assume competence in working with older lesbians and gay men without retraining or consultation with a gay male or lesbian practitioner. Gay professionals might want to carefully review their own "coming out" process or their need to stay "in the closet." How we feel about ourselves as lesbians and gay men and our own aging will affect our professional relationships with older lesbians and gay men.  - Substance use and high risk sexual behaviors among rural gay men: "A total of 770, sexually active, gay/bisexual men were included in this analysis. 88% were white, 63% were 30 years-old or older. Among young gay men, 43% reported having sex with alcohol, 22% had sex with drugs, 34% used marijuana, 11% cocaine, and 5% amyl nitrate in the last three months. Among older gay men, 49% reported having sex with alcohol, 21% had sex with drugs, 29% used marijuana, 9% amyl nitrate, and 6% used intravenous drugs. Among young gay men, 56% reported inconsistent condom use during anal sex, 33% had anal sex with multiple partners, and 48% received semen in their mouth during oral sex in the last three months. Among older gay men, 50% reported inconsistent condom use during anal sex, 25% had anal sex with multiple partners, 45% received semen in their mouth during oral sex. Twenty-five percent of the younger gay men had never been tested for HIV antibody as compared to 16% of older gay men. Conclusion: Young gay men use different kinds of drugs than older men. Although young gay men appear to engage in more risky sexual behaviors, this study shows that older gay men still engage in high risk behaviors. Targeted interventions must take into consideration these age-related differences in substance use and sexual behaviors." - Generational Differences Among Gay Men In the Coming Out Process, Self-Esteem, and HIV Risk (2000, PDF Download, Salt Lake City, Utah). - Older Gays Involved in Caregiving (2004): Nearly half of gay and lesbian individuals over 50 are heavily involved in caregiving, both for members of the families they grew up in and for same-sex partners and close friends, according to a new study. Caregiving is the extensive, hands-on help with the tasks of daily living for the very sick or frail. In fact, gay people over 50 may actually be caregivers at a higher rate than their counterparts in the general population, concluded the report released Friday by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute, Pride Senior Network, and the Fordham University Graduate School of Social Service...  Federal Programs Disregard Gay Caregivers.

Gay Widowers edited by Michael Shernoff (Ed) (1998). (Related Information: Michael Shernoff lost his partner to AIDS. He found himself drawn to others who were gay widowers, giving comfort to each other. He was astounded that there were no books by or about the process of gay men becoming widowers.) (Introduction to GAY WIDOWERS: Surviving the Death of A Partner: This book contains a widely diverse cross section of our community. Thus, men of different ages and racial, ethnic, religious, geographic and economic backgrounds are all included. My hope is that if your lover is currently dying, this book will provide you with some hope for a meaningful life after he has gone, while beginning to prepare you for the realities of just how difficult a transition awaits you. If you are a recent or even a not-so-recent widower, I expect that you will find some of your experiences reflected in the stories, and discover an additional source of comfort in recognizing some of what you are currently going through, or have gone through. If, by some chance, you are not gay and are reading this book, I sincerely hope that you will come to understand the universality of the human experience as told by the men who have shared their experiences in the following pages. If you are a member of one of the helping professions my hope is that the stories told in the following pages will help you in your work with all clients, but specifically gay men who are about to or who have already become widowers. I hope that you will find this book to be a useful and friendly companion as you navigate these uncharted waters.

Shernoff, Michael (1998). Gay Widowers: Grieving in Relation to Trauma and Social Supports. Journal of the Gay & Lesbian Medical Association, 2(1). Full Text. Objective: To describe the psychosocial issues relevant to gay widowers, and how social support is central for them to resolve their grief in a functional way, and to offer some comparisons between heterosexual and gay widowers, thus assisting health care professionals in best serving this population and illuminating areas for further research. Design: The findings are primarily from empirical clinical practice with support from the literature. Results: The lack of recognition for male couples in general and for the status of a gay man as a widower in particular, complicates the grieving process. Conclusions: Gay men whose partners die exhibit the constellation of classic symptoms manifested by survivors of other traumatic events. Mental health professionals can play important roles in providing support and healing during the mourning process of gay widowers.

Hash, Khristina (2001). Caregiving and Post-caregiving Experiences of Midlife and Older Gay Men and Lesbians. Ph.D. Dissertation, School of Social Work, Virginia Commonwealth University. - Webpage for PDF Downloads: - Signature page, Dedication, Acknowledgements, Table of Contents. - Abstract. - Introduction. - Literature Review. - Methodology. - Findings. - Implications. - References, Appendix, Vita. - Executive Summary: Respondents had similar experiences in caregiving as those in previous caregiving studies, including managing the bulk of the caregiving responsibilities and experiencing physical and emotional strains and conflicts with employment responsibilities. Similarly, respondents experienced loneliness and depression following the loss of the caregiving role and faced the challenge of moving on with their lives after this loss. As with other caregivers, respondents also valued the opportunity to show love and commitment through providing care. Important in this study were the unique aspects of caregiving and post-caregiving for the respondents. Their unique experiences involved their interactions with informal (family, friends, coworkers) and formal (health care and other professionals) support persons and services and their long-term planning and decision-making processes. Persons outside of the partner relationship had the potential to greatly affect the caregiving and post-caregiving experiences. Respondents were often faced with informal support persons who were not accepting of their relationship. As a result, some family and coworkers did not acknowledge the relationship or provide the level of support needed during caregiving or bereavement. Ex-spouses and adult children, in some cases, were particularly hostile toward the couple and the caregiver. Despite family and coworkers who were unsupportive, some had the advantage of a strong network of friends and family members who were supportive of the partner relationship. Although homophobic attitudes were not often overtly expressed by professionals, they were many times apparent through slighting remarks or rude or hostile behavior on the part of professionals. Some policies and practices were also insensitive to same-sex partners, often insisting that the “next of kin” was not a partner. Although some poor treatment was attributed to homophobia, much was seen as the result of a health care system that has become far too impersonal. Others experienced further discrimination based on race, age, mental health status, and HIV status. Unsupportive policies and 2 practices were also apparent outside of health and human services in community businesses. For example, the term “partner” was in some cases omitted from newspaper obituaries and in one case two male partners were not permitted to share a mausoleum drawer.

XThe Pride Agenda Foundation's annual report on the state of health and social services for LGBT people (in New York): 2001 Report, PDF Download. - 2000 Report, PDF Download. - 1998-99 Report: "Frequently overlooked groups of LGBT people, including youth, the elderly, people of color, and immigrants, are particularly poorly served by mainstream health and social service providers, and are particularly vulnerable." - Senior Health Resources (SHR) N/A (Archive Link) (Washinton, DC) has been established to provide a full array of quality  health-related services for the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) community.

Bringing LGBT Health Care to the World Health Organization (2013): The World Health Organization (WHO) -- the health body of the United Nations -- has led efforts to reduce health disparities for women, ethnic, racial and religious minorities, those with disabilities, and others who have struggled to attain the health care they need. We think it is timely for WHO to take this same leadership role for the LGBT population... When the U.S., Thailand and Brazil petitioned to have an LGBT health item added to the Board meeting's agenda, we realized it would lead to a robust debate. Unfortunately, history was made in another way when a number of African and Middle Eastern countries, called for the item's deletion from the agenda. Never before in the history of WHO has one Executive Board member asked that an item, legitimately placed on the agenda by other member states, be removed... Ultimately a compromise was reached. The item was removed from the day's agenda, and over the coming months the head of WHO, Dr. Margaret Chan, will talk with concerned governments to find common ground to identify WHO's role. If wording can be agreed, the item will presumably be added to the agenda of the January 2014 Executive Board meeting.



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HIV / AIDS

Are we ready for an elderly gay population? (2012): How about our older gay generation? It’s almost like they are forgotten and ignored. When was the last time you saw a safe-sex campaign aimed at older gay men? Clearly I am not the only person thinking about this important topic, given the recent press.

Reality Check: The LGBT Community Must Look at the Changing Face of AIDS (2012, Alternate Link):
The face of AIDS in America is rapidly changing: It is getting older and grayer. Thanks to the medications that have prolonged the lives of so many with this disease, within the next five years, more than half of all Americans with HIV will be 50 or older. But the graying of HIV is not just a matter of longer lifespans; older Americans are at far higher risk of HIV infection than they may be aware of. Around one in six new HIV diagnoses is an adult aged 50 or older. In 2009 alone, nearly one quarter of all new HIV diagnoses were in that demographic. In addition, the available data clearly documents that the HIV epidemic has disproportionately affected men who have sex with men, people of color, and transgender people -- of all ages, including elders. As Americans with HIV age, and as the high rates of HIV infection in older Americans become apparent, new problems are emerging. Medical providers often treat older adults as essentially asexual beings, underestimating their desire for and level of sexual activity. Thus, they assume that older adults are at low risk of the disease, failing to advise them on HIV protection.

SAGE: HIV & Aging: SAGE's programs on HIV and aging. SAGE provides essential services to LGBT older adults with HIV in New York City by partnering with local agencies that reach aging, health and social service providers. At the national level, SAGE provides cultural competence training for mainstream aging providers on these issues through SAGE's National Resource Center on LGBT Aging. Read through the National Resource Center's HIV/AIDS resources. SAGE's advocacy efforts on HIV and aging. SAGE's federal advocacy works in partnership with the AIDS Community Research Initiative of America and the Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC). Our policy goals include: defining older adults with HIV as a population in "greatest social need" in the Older Americans Act; improving epidemiological surveillance systems and data collection at the CDC on older adults with HIV; supporting demonstration projects and Special Projects of National Significance through HHS; instituting routine HIV testing for all adults without regard to age or risk factor; increasing federal funding of research and programmatic interventions on older adults with HIV; and more. Read a SAGE blog posting on AIDS.gov at the US Department of Health and Human Services. - National Resource Center on LGBT Aging Introduces Resources on Older Adults Living with HIV (2011): Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) announced today that it has introduced a variety of HIV and aging resources on its National Resource Center on LGBT Aging website...The National Resource Center on LGBT Aging provides critical information on living with HIV/AIDS to LGBT older adults, and seeks to inform aging services providers and LGBT organizations of LGBT elders’ needs. New resources include: Articles on the challenges - and solutions - facing LGBT older people living with HIV/AIDS (OPLWHA); A primer for OPLWHA on antidiscrimination laws; Videos of LGBT OPLWHA telling their own stories; Webinars and presentations by experts in the field on HIV and aging issues; A roadmap for future research into understanding the impacts of aging with HIV/AIDS.

"HIV/AIDS 50+ Support Group - LGBT Elders Of Color" Program (GRIOT Circle -A Safe Space for LGBT Elders of Color. Brooklyn, NY, USA.): LGBT seniors of color with HIV/AIDS discuss their unique issues with a support group therapy in a safe space... Live in isolation or are afraid to tell family and friends that they have HIV/AIDS are able to access a supportive place to discuss their illness... Watch Video on the Organization "Griot Circle"...  GRIOT Circle Inc. WebSite.

Banks, Virginia D (2012). HIV and the Elderly. PPT as PDF Download. USA Epidemiology of HIV in Older Persons... The AIDS epidemic has disproportionately affected men who sex with men, gay and bisexual, people of color and transgender people - of all ages, including the elderly. More than 1000 diagnoses of HIV infection were reported among MSM age 55 and older each year from 2006 - 2009, according to CDC data... In one study , 80% of LGBT older people with HIV lived alone, compared with 67% of older heterosexuals living with HIV... Men who have sex with men form the largest group of AIDS cases among adults over 50.  Older gay men tend to be invisible and ignored both in the gay community and in prevention.  Among HIV risk factors for older gay men are internalized homophobia, denial of risk, alcohol and other substance abuse, and anonymous sexual encounters... Nursing homes and assisted living facilities may not be supportive environments for older adults with HIV to live.  Concerns re: discrimination, ostracism of LGBT elders feeling like they need to go back “ in the closet” while in senior housing, or in other senior settings.  Long term relationships may be devalued and unrecognized. Some nursing home staff may be homophobic and treat clients presumed to be gay in a discriminatory manner... There is evidence that LGBT older people living with HIV are affected by the harmful effects of social isolation including depression, poor nutrition and premature mortality. In addition fear of discrimination often prevents LGBT elders from seeking the health care they need until it is too late, which means they can present with advanced HIV infection (e.g. AIDS) leading to worse health outcomes. Prevention messages often ignore LGBT older people or assume that older people are not sexually active... LGBT community centers, other agencies should encourage community caregiving for elders living with HIV ( like a buddy program).  Home healthcare aide should be trained in the particular experiences and needs of HIV+ elders and LGBT elders to ensure culturally competent and nondiscriminatory care...Improved research and data collection on older people living with HIV.  Prevention messages that target elders of all sexual orientations and gender identities.  More programs that acknowledge and address the fact that LGBT older people and /or older adults living with HIV often have inadequate support from their communities or families of origin.  Training that is offered by SAGE’s National Resource Center on LGBT Aging... 

GMHC (2010, Gay Men’s Health Crisis, Inc.) Growing Older With the Epidemic: HIV and Aging. New York, NY: Gay Men’s Health Crisis, Inc. PDF Download.  According to one estimate, more than half of all HIV-positive individuals in the United States will be 50 or older by 2015, but increasing longevity is not the only reason that the population of people over 50 with HIV has been increasing so rapidly. New HIV diagnoses are rising among older adults as well, and this graying of the HIV epidemic has many clinicians and researchers concerned... Men who have sex with men (MSM) are also disproportionately represented among people living with HIV. About four percent of men (two percent of all adults) report having sex with other men, but according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 48% of people living with HIV, and 57% of people diagnosed in 2006, . were MSM... Older African Americans and gay men are  disproportionately affected by HIV... Of newly diagnosed men 50 and older in New York City, only 24% reported unprotected sex with other men.17 Another 15% reported intravenous drug use as their risk factor, and an additional 15% said their risk factor was unprotected heterosexual sex. Over half, however, reported an “unknown” risk factor. By contrast, 61% of newly diagnosed males ages 13 to 49 reported sex with other men as a risk factor; 5% reported intravenous drug use, and another 5% reported unprotected heterosexual sex.
- HIV and Age: The Great Paradox (1997): All along, I've been convinced that HIV disease would ultimately conform to the usual pattern of sexually transmitted diseases, i.e., with about 90% of infections happening to people in their teens and twenties. I expected that the 1985-era situation, with so many AIDS cases among men in their 30s and 40s, would prove transitory, and that soon enough the eternal verity of "young people careless, older people cautious" would assert itself. To my astonishment, the exact opposite has happened.

The Elderly and HIV / AIDS (1998, Alternate Link): It's not just with regard to prevention that over-50s are left behind. Older people with HIV are often misdiagnosed and typically learn that they have the virus only later in the disease process. Medical treatment is more difficult, both because of the later diagnosis and factors related to age. Few practitioners are expert both in HIV and the health problems associated with aging. When it comes to social support services aimed at their particular needs, older PWAs are all but invisible. Our attitudes about AIDS and the aging reflect the beliefs we have built up about how people behave in their second half-century:... - HIV education, prevention programs needed for US seniors (2000): HIV and AIDS education and prevention programs have largely ignored people older than 50 years, despite the fact that this group represents more than 10% of Americans with AIDS, according to researchers convened here by the National Institute on Aging. - Aging with HIV (2000): It is too easy to blame all our ills on HIV. Sorting problems into their proper categories helps us to deal with them better. Improving our nutritional and age related problems frees our immune system to fight the hardest battle, the one against HIV. As we age, we must continue to exercise, remain socially active, work at stress reduction, eat a varied diet, take a multivitamin/mineral supplement daily and keep in touch with our health care providers, and our nutritionists. - National Association on HIV Over Fifty: The New England Association on HIV over Fifty website. 

Never Too Old: Sexually active seniors are one of the fastest-growing HIV-infected populations in the U.S. (1999): Many elderly people are reluctant to discuss their intimate life with strangers. "A lot of people were taught that you don't air your dirty laundry," says John Gargotta, supervisor for the Senior HIV Intervention Project, an AIDS advocacy group. Most troubling, though, is that doctors often fail to consider HIV as a possible illness among their senior patients. As a result, the elderly are often misdiagnosed. Also, AIDS symptoms like dementia and weight loss can mimic the ravages of old age. "So there is a higher prevalence of people being diagnosed in the month of death," says Dr. Karl Goodkin, an associate professor at the University of Miami School of Medicine. Goodkin, who is conducting a national study on the rate of cognitive impairment in HIV-infected elderly, says the virus proceeds to full-blown AIDS twice as fast in seniors, making early detection all the more crucial. - HIV and the Older Adult (2007): The truth of the matter is that HIV surveillance shows that 11 percent of all new AIDS cases are in people over the age of 50. Statistics also show that new AIDS cases rose faster in the over 50 population than in people under 40. The following information sheds light on HIV and the older adult population and what can be done to raise awareness, slow the infection rate, and sustain a high quality of life for our seniors. - AIDSAction Recommendations (2001): Older Americans and HIV/AIDS (PDF Download): Older Americans are less aware of HIV/AIDS than younger populations and may be less likely to protect themselves against HIV infection. Individuals in their 50’s and 60’s are much less likely to know someone living with HIV or AIDS compared to younger generations, and this may result in misconceptions about HIV/AIDS. Since HIV infection is the result of behaviors rather than age, prevention efforts for every population must include information that is frank and geared to the targeted group. As a result of cultural norms and generational issues, education about HIV and AIDS for older Americans may be challenging; however, the rate of HIV infection among older Americans will not decline without sufficient information on HIV prevention and care

Aging and HIV Risk Among Gay Men (2002): To examine how the HIV risk of gay men over 40 may be influenced by the aging process... 27 Toronto-area gay men interviewed individually, plus two focus groups of gay men, who responded to a public appeal from the AIDS Committee of Toronto to express concerns about the health needs of men over 40. Respondents’ ages ranged from 40 to 68... Interviews and focus groups with gay men reveal a set of concerns around aging, and age-related issues in safe sex decision-making. Respondents report concerns with the youth orientation of the gay scene, a diminished sense of desirability, and experiences of loss and loneliness due to AIDS, but also satisfactions with being older. Current explanations for unsafe sex, such as condom fatigue, treatment optimism, and insertor invulnerability are thought to be plausible for other men but are denied as motivators for own behaviour. Respondents link unsafe sex with episodes of feeling worthless, trading off safety to a valued partner, surrendering oneself in sex, and assessment of impending mortality. Condom use also exacerbates a declining ability to sustain an erection among some men... The results suggest communicative strategies to engage with the internal narratives of gay men aound safer sex decision making. They also suggest that community-building in ways that support and value the lives of older gay men may enhance safer sex choices. - Sexuality and HIV Issues Among Older Gay Men (PDF Download, Toronto) 

Ageism Affects HIV Prevention Efforts for Over 50 Groups (1999): Pride Senior Network's Executive Director, Stephen Karpiak, was invited to address the Prevention Planning Group of New York City (PPG) on the topic "Seniors and HIV Infection" (7/20/99). Karpiak reminded the Prevention Planning Group that between 10-12% of newly reported HIV infections occur in those over the age of 50. However, this population does not see itself at high risk for HIV. Complicating this, is the fact that physicians often overlook the symptoms of HIV infection in seniors, resulting in delayed treatment. Many symptoms of HIV infection can be confused with the normal effects of aging. The fact that many seniors and doctors do not regard the elderly as "at risk" for HIV, compounds the problem. - Aging with HIV/AIDS: The experience of gay men in late middle age (2007): Middle-aged gay men represent a large and growing segment of those living with HIV/AIDS. Yet, we know little about the challenges associated with aging at middle age for this population. - HIV and Aging Issues Bibliography (1997).

Condom Use, Disclosure, and Risk for Unprotected Sex in HIV-Negative Midlife and Older Men Who Have Sex With Men (2012): Sexual risk behaviors account for most HIV infections in men who have sex with men (MSM), and the risk of exposure from each sexual encounter increases with age. The focus of this study was to investigate which behaviors in midlife and older MSM influence their sexual risk/protection. Cross-sectional data were collected from a community-based sample of 802 MSM aged 40 years and older from community venues (e.g., bars) who completed an anonymous questionnaire. Data from a subset of 420 MSM who were HIV-negative (aged 40-81 years) were used to investigate which behaviors were associated with greater risk for unprotected anal sex... These data indicate there may be certain factors specific to older MSM that influence their sexual risk taking behaviors. Programs may be more effective if they are tailored for older cohorts of MSM and address interpersonal communication, erection problems, and substance use to reduce health risks and promote healthier lifestyles.

Lim SH, Christen CL, Marshal MP, Stall RD, Markovic N, Kim KH, Silvestre AJ (2012). Middle-aged and older men who have sex with men exhibit multiple trajectories with respect to the number of sexual partners. AIDS and Behavior, 16(3): 590-598. Abstract. PDF Download. This study aimed to examine trajectories with respect to the number of sexual partners among older men who have sex with men and to determine characteristics associated with trajectory groups. Nagin's group-based modeling was used to identify trajectories for 237 men from the Pitt Men's Study with respect to the number of male intercourse partners from age 50.0 to 59.5. Three distinct trajectory groups were identified. Most men (69.2%) had a median of two sexual partners in the past 6 months across the age range of the study. A smaller group (19.4%) had low or no sex partners. The smallest group (11.4%) had 30 or more sexual partners in the past 6 months at age 50. The groups were statistically different with respect to race, HIV status, drug use (marijuana, poppers, crack cocaine, and Viagra), the number of unprotected anal sex partners, and personal attitudes towards sex.

Siegel K, Schrimshaw EW, Karus D (2004). Racial disparities in sexual risk behaviors and drug use among older gay/bisexual and heterosexual men living with HIV/AIDS. Journal of the National Medical Association, 96(2): 215-223. Abstract. PDF Download. Adults over age 50 comprise 11% of yearly AIDS cases, yet little is known about their sexual risk behaviors and drug use following diagnosis with HIV/AIDS. The present questionnaire study examines potential racial differences in sexual risk and drug use behaviors among 59 HIV-infected gay/bisexual and heterosexual men over age 50 who were recruited from HIV-related organizations in New York City between 1996-1998. The majority (59%) of older men reported unprotected sex since diagnosis, and 36% had done so in the past six months. African-American gay/bisexual men (n=12) were significantly more likely than white gay/bisexual men (n=32) to report unprotected vaginal/anal sex in the past six months (67% versus 22%, p<0.01), since diagnosis (42% versus 9%, p<0.05), and to report a history of intravenous drug use (50% versus 3%, p<0.01), but did not differ from heterosexual African-American men (n=15). No differences were found in reports of unprotected oral sex or recent use of hard drugs (i.e., crack, cocaine, heroin). These findings suggest that interventions targeting older African-American men (both gay/bisexual and heterosexual) with HIV/AIDS are needed to reduce risk behaviors and prevent HIV transmission in this population.

Risk and Protective Factors Associated with Health-Related Quality of Life Among Older Gay and Bisexual Men Living With HIV Disease (2013): Survey responses from 226 gay and bisexual men aged 50 and older, and living with HIV disease, which were part of the Caring and Aging with Pride study, were analyzed using multivariate linear regression models... Findings reveal that comorbidity, limitations in activities, and victimization are significant risk factors for decreased physical and mental health-related quality of life. Stigma and HIV progression did not contribute to the overall outcome variables in multivariate models. Social support and self-efficacy serve as protective factors although social support was only significant with mental health-related quality of life... Comorbidity, functional limitations, and lifetime victimization are risks to quality of life among older gay and bisexual men with HIV disease. Self-efficacy and social support represent intrapersonal and interpersonal resources that can be enhanced through interventions to improve health-related quality of life.

Benevedes JM (2006). Making Meaning of Seroconversion in Older Gay Men. Focus, 21(10): 5-6. PDF Download. PDF Download. Making meaning of seroconversion for me and Ned has turned out to be a tale of two journeys mediated by the dark feminine: mine from judgment to compassion and Ned’s from isolation to transformation. I almost always meet the news of a new seroconversion with a clinical and logical focus. But for me to truly integrate the information and find meaning in it, I have to enlist a spiritual perspective. I have found there to be a parallel process with clients, who often react the same way, moving from struggle with the news to acceptance to compassion for themselves and others. It is this spiritual context, the potentially transformational aspect of an event, that eases the pain and judgment I feel when I learn that another brother, young or old, has seroconverted. A new HIV infection challenges me to remember that compassion is my most important daily practice, and offers me a lesson in acceptance: we do not control all of the events that occur in our lives.

Kertzner RM (2006). Beyond Coming Out: Gay Men, HIV, and Age. Focus, 21(10): 1-4. PDF Download. PDF Download.  How do gay men experience the psychological and social passage from young adulthood to middle age and later life? What are the implications of growing older for gay men’s psychological and sexual wellbeing, their behavior, and their capacities to live with HIV? Beyond the stereotype of gay male aging as a descent from “adolescence to obsolescence,” how do we understand the diversity and richness that characterize the lives of gay men as they age?

Living a Positive Life: A Perspective on HIV-Positive Older Adults (2011). - Versatility and HIV Vulnerability: Patterns of Insertive and Receptive Anal Sex in a National Sample of Older Australian Gay Men (2012):  Among men with multiple sexual partners, 20 % were highly versatile, that is, reported similar numbers of IAI and RAI partners. Having HIV (P = 0.003) and living in a rural area (P = 0.04) were significantly associated with being highly versatile. These data point to high rates of versatility among older Australian gay men, with implications for mathematical predictions of change in HIV epidemics and for the design of future HIV prevention strategies.

Jimenez AD (2003). Triple jeopardy: targeting older men of color who have sex with men. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 33 Suppl 2:S222-S225. Abstract. This article presents selected findings from a needs assessment conducted for a community-based organization in Chicago that targeted black and Latino men 50 years and older who have sex with men (MSM). A convenience sample of 110 self-identified minority MSM was recruited through agency sources and administered a 73-question survey. Most men surveyed (>90%) reported sex with other men, with 20% reporting unprotected receptive anal sex and most reporting drug use in conjunction with sex. The data showed varying sexual self-identification, with 45% identified as either bisexual or mostly or completely straight and a substantial proportion (36%) reporting sexual activity with women. A large percentage disclosed being relatively secretive about their same-sex behaviors to others, however, and ranked homosexual-related and HIV-related stigma high. Most men (74%) perceived themselves to be at minimal risk for contracting HIV infection, and 50% ranked their level of worry about contracting HIV infection as low. Noteworthy among the findings were the linked variables of age and race, revealing that older minority MSM may be at elevated risk because they are sexually active, often have multiple partners, and include drug use as part of their sexual episodes. Race and age also may play an important role in determining patterns of sexual identity formation, whether older minority MSM disclose same-sex practices to others or perceive gay-related or HIV-related stigmatization. Implications of these data for interventions targeting older minority MSM suggest the need for culturally sensitive and specific dissemination of basic HIV prevention information and promotion of HIV testing.

Cooperman NA, Arnsten JH, Klein RS (2007). Current sexual activity and risky sexual behavior in older men with or at risk for HIV infection. AIDS Education and Prevention, 19(4): 321-333. Abstract. PDF Download.  In a cross-sectional analysis, we investigated frequency of sexual activity and factors associated with risky sexual behavior among 624 oldermen, aged 49-80, with or at risk for HIV infection. During the prior 6 months, 75% reported sexual activity with at least one partner, and one quarter of both the HIV-negative and HIV-positive men had more than one sexual partner. Only 18% of the HIV-negative men and 58% of the HIV-positive men always used condoms with their sexual partners. Factors independently and positively associated with risky sexual behavior included lack of HIV infection, any drug use in the past 6 months, greater importance of sex in one's life, weekly or more frequent sexual activity in the past 6 months, and ever taking sildenafil. These results suggest that older men with or at risk for HIV infection are sexually active, participate in risky sexual behavior, and need safer sex interventions.


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Homes / Housing / Care

Hard Times for Gay Retirement Havens (2011):  So when RainbowVision swung open its doors in 2006 as one of the first retirement communities in the country to proudly serve gay men and lesbians, offering elegant adobes where people could live out their lives among friends, the couple could not move in fast enough.  “This was our safety valve,” Ms. Gaynor said.  These days, that promise is all but forgotten. RainbowVision has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, racked by financial problems and an increasingly bitter dispute between residents and management. Its problems mirror those of many other gay retirement communities around the country that have either failed to open or fallen on hard times, victims of a weakened housing market, a deflated economy and, in some cases, poor business decisions.  They were once hailed as havens where the so-called Stonewall generation — the first “out” group of senior citizens — could age without being treated with hostility or forced back into the closet. But such communities in Austin, Tex.; Boston and in the Phoenix area never opened because of a lack of finances and a decline in real estate values. A development near Portland, Ore., is struggling at 25 percent of capacity, and another near Sarasota, Fla., has, like RainbowVision, filed for bankruptcy.

Jackson, Scott John (2012). An Explanation For The Non-integration Of Gay Men Into Retirement Communities. Master's Dissertation, The University of Texas at Arlington. PDF Download. Download Page. This qualitative research paper explores the reasons why gay men are not integrating into retirement communities. Through extensive interviews, three major themes emerged- “not out but hiding”, “the need to pass at work”, and “concern over caregivers”.

Optimistic Housing Outlook for Older Gays, Lesbians (2000): "If we build it, will they come?" asked Terry Kaelber, executive director of Senior Action in a Gay Environment (SAGE), New York City. This question hovers over every investor considering whether to finance a housing project geared for the growing ranks of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders. Kaelber reported on the study's findings during a symposium titled "Laying the Foundation: Housing Options for Gay and Lesbian Older Adults" at the 45th Annual Meeting of the American Society on Aging in Orlando, Fla., in March. Speakers presented a smorgasbord of housing alternatives for LGBT elders, ranging from a planned five-acre housing collective for women in Washington state to a 22-acre development now operating in Palmetto, Fla.--probably the first lesbian and gay retirement village in the United States. - An Emerging Market: Retirement Homes for LGBT Elders (2002):  Retirement communities designed specifically for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) population represent an untapped and little-understood market. I have researched this market for the past six years, and more than 1,700 people have registered their interest in Our Town, my project to develop for-profit retirement communities for LGBT elders. Nearly 700 individuals have completed a detailed six-page survey. This article is based on the 241 responses from people ages 55 to 72--the target market for my project. Although many of the services and amenities desired and needed by LGBT older adults are the same as those offered in existing retirement housing models, I found in my research that the delivery of services and the sensibility of the community must be very different. These differences can make reaching and serving the older adult LGBT market challenging. - Call for more LGBT training for care home staff after gay resident attempts suicide (2012, UK): The Rainbow Lives Project, which offers diversity training for care workers, has called for more care homes to offer training after a woman attempted suicide due to homophobic bullying.

There's no place like home (2002): Members of minority groups who want to grow old together have caused a major rethink in residential care circles...Taking care of the residential needs of elderly members of ethnic, religious and sexual orientation minorities is set to be one of the fastest growing issues in care politics over the next decade. Ten years ago, 4% of the white population over 60 lived in communal dwellings such as care homes and hos pitals - three times as many as Afro-Caribbean and Asians in the same age group. Now demographics are on the move. Minority populations are ageing with fewer proportionally falling into the "young old" 60- to 74-year range. And many fear an inevitable erosion of the greater respect for older people and inter-generational solidarity among minorities. Lesbian and gay numbers in the elderly community are also set to rise. Few now in the 80- plus age group ever came out to define their sexuality. As time passes, that number will increase.  - Aging When You Are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender (2007): LGBT elders also face challenges that many elders face today, such as affordable housing, ageism, and trying to live on fixed incomes as the cost of living soars. The latest catch phrase of “aging in place” really only applies to heterosexuals and will continue to exclude LGBT elders until the Social Security Administration and state Medicaid programs begin to recognize long-term partnerships in their provision of benefits. So where do we go from here? As the LGBT Aging Project of Boston suggests, in the not-too-distant future, the first generation of very openly LGBT elders will enter “the system” and this has the potential to cause an extraordinary cultural clash, legal struggles and financial disasters for countless families, as well as service and employment issues for providers.
 
Senior Housing: In Retirement, Gays and Lesbians Forge New Communities (2000): Nationwide, there are the beginnings of a move to develop and build retirement communities for older gays and lesbians, a generally well-heeled segment of the population. "Part of what's driving this, as lesbians and gays are getting older, they're looking for community," said Terry Kaelber, director of Senior Action in a Gay Environment, a New York City social service agency. "Community is important." The construction of gay and lesbian senior communities is underway in traditional retirement havens from Florida -- where the country's first such facility has been in business for more than a year -- to California, future home of Our Town, where, a brochure says, "we can laugh at our own jokes, love who we want, and be accepted for who we are." Such communities have existed in de factor forms for years. The Phoenix area is home to a handful of trailer and recreational vehicle parks that cater to lesbians with a "don't ask, don't tell" type of arrangement. The same sort of unofficial gay communities exist in Florida, Texas, North Carolina, Mississippi and Alabama -- the front-line states for senior migration. Mostly, state and civic leaders are delighted to accommodate retirees, but this new wave of identified gay and lesbian housing developments sometimes clashes with local mores. - The Florida Palms: First Gay Retirement Community (2004): You don't have to be retired to live here. The homeowners, aged 45 to nearly 80, love to party, host dinners and social events, and go on outings. But this is not a resort. The Palms homes are designed for retirement, with all the issues of aging taken into account. The homes are accessible with wider doorways, no stairs, and larger bathrooms with room for a wheelchair if or when someone needs to use one.

'Openhouse' takes root by the Bay (2007): Marcy Adelman, Ph.D., founded Rainbow Adult Community Housing back in 1998 as a community group dedicated to serving older GLBT people in the San Francisco Bay Area. Changing its name to "openhouse" in 2004, the project has morphed into a nonprofit organization whose central focus is finding and providing housing for this population. The group's most ambitious project to date is the imminent construction of an eighty-unit building for GLBT seniors.  A longtime activist for GLBT senior issues, Adelman is the editor of Lesbian Passages: True Stories Told by Women over 40 (1996), and of Midlife Lesbian Relationships: Friends, Lovers, Children, and Parents (2000). This interview was conducted last November via a combination of tape-recorded phone conversations and e-mail exchanges.  Gay & Lesbian Review: Let me ask you to talk about open-house, which you founded several years ago.  Marcy Adelman: I founded openhouse with my late partner, Jeanette Gurevitch, in 1998 to address the needs of aging GLBT people in the San Francisco Bay area, because we are not integrated into the city's senior care system. Because of discrimination, our seniors have to go back into the closet to access senior housing and services, or they simply do not access these services at all. Even though our seniors are seventeen percent of San Francisco's senior population--approximately 25,000 GLBT seniors--we are substantially underrepresented. Because they are isolated and not accessing available senior services and housing resources, they are at greater risk for poor health, increased disability, and a shorter life span.  By 2010, about 29 percent of all San Franciscans will be over 55 years of age. There's a tidal wave of GLBT baby boomers about to be old, and the city is not prepared to help us. Most Bay Area senior facilities are receptive to our issues but do not provide sensitive services and housing. GLBT seniors, both locally here in San Francisco and nationally, are at great risk for poor health and quality of life issues because the long-term care system in this country is neither welcoming nor responsive to our needs.

Housing projects for :gays and grays" built to fill need (2007): The sixtysomething couple wanted to live in the nation's first full-fledged retirement community for gays and lesbians. They sold their house in California and moved into a condominium at Rainbow Vision Santa Fe this summer. - Mature Gays Find Solace in Gay Nursing Homes (2006): According to Affirmations Lesbian and Gay Community Center: Nearly 20% of gay seniors have no one to care for them should they become ill, vs. 2% for heterosexual seniors. 2/3 of gay seniors live alone vs. 1/3 of heterosexual seniors. In response to the growing number of "stonewall seniors" that require assisted living, glbt-focused retirement facilities are being built all over the world. One such community is Santa Fe, New Mexico based RainbowVision, where seniors enjoy outdoor and indoor activities with other gay seniors. More mature gay care facilities are being built throughout the U.S. and the world as the queer baby boomers grow older.  - Senior housing for gray gays becomes smart business (2005): "We didn't feel comfortable with the idea of a straight retirement community," Hodges said. "A lot of older people don't have liberal ideals. So we would be against their religion, an 'abomination' and all that good stuff. We didn't want to live out our twilight years in that type of environment." At the time, only one such community existed in the United States: Palms of Manasota in Palmetto, Fla. With its modest palm-shaded villas, Palms was the nation's first community solely for graying gays. But now that's about to change. Rainbow Vision, a soon-to-be sparkling $32 million resort for gay seniors in Santa Fe, N.M., broke ground in January. It is just one of several gay retirement communities from Hollywood, Calif., to Boston slated to start construction this year.

Brownworth VA (2013). Looking After Our Lesbian Elders. Curve, April: 46-47. PDF Download. Where will we live as we age? Some communities are attempting to answer that question with LGBT senior-specific housing being built with the goal of serving of an aging—and out— queer population. This kind of housing runs the gamut—from pricey single family dwellings in resort-like settings to efficiency apartments for LGBT seniors with the restrictive incomes that many older lesbians will have... Money is the first thing to take into account when choosing a place to live out your golden—or lavender—years. Other issues include safety, access to health care, climate and proximity to friends and family. And then there’s the nature of the community you’ll live in. Will you suffer discrimination? Will you have to explain yourself, or will questions about you and your partner be unnecessary? The concept behind Fountaingrove Lodge, in Santa Rosa, Calif., is well-appointed living in serene surroundings. Fountaingrove promotes itself as the nation’s first LGBT senior community designed both for people who can live independently and for people who require continuing care. Fountaingrove looks like a resort hotel, with everything from the requisite pool and golf course to resident gardens and orchards. There’s a movie theater, fitness center, art studio, bank, and drivers to take residents off the property. Since it’s in the heart of California wine country, there is a wine cellar on site... While Fountaingrove has leisure at its heart, BoaF is oriented toward women interested in the outdoors and what the desert climate has to offer. (There’s a riding stable on the property, as well as numerous hiking trails.) The appeal of Fountaingrove and Birds of a Feather is alluring, if you can afford them. For those who cannot, different options are evolving. Cities with large LGBT populations, notably San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Philadelphia, have activists working to create affordable housing for LGBT people. GLEH (Gay & Lesbian Elder Housing) is a model for such low-income housing in an urban setting. Triangle Square, a $20 million, 104-unit building in Hollywood, was opened in 2007. A documentary about the process, A Place to Live: The Story of Triangle (YouTube Synopsis), underscores just how intensely lesbians and gay men feel about living in a queer senior community... Openhouse in San Francisco is devoted to creating lowincome housing for LGBT seniors. In December 2012, Mayor Ed Lee announced that a grant of $6.1 million had been allocated to build 110 units of affordable housing for LGBT seniors. Ground breaking on the site is scheduled for this year. In Chicago, an 80-unit housing development is scheduled to be built by 2014 in Boystown, the city’s major queer neighborhood. Chicago’s LGBT center has a program offering services to approximately 500 LGBT seniors that includes home visits as well as social activities.

Low-income LGBT seniors to get housing (2005): Los Angeles officials and advocates for LGBT seniors will celebrate on Thursday with a groundbreaking ceremony for the nation's first affordable-housing facility aimed at older LGBT adults. - Group Seeks Housing Help for Elderly Gays (2003): The Hollywood retirement complex, expected to open in 2005, is intended to provide a comfortable environment. Harry Bartron toured the country with his one-man pantomime show. He worked as an extra in more than 100 movies. Now at 85, his working days are over and he's forced to make ends meet on $798 per month. He likes that his subsidized senior housing is in the historic Knickerbocker Hotel, and he's grateful that his rent is only $223 per month. But Bartron, who is gay, isn't openly so at the Knickerbocker, where he's not sure that all his neighbors would be accepting... "This will be an energetic place, with music and art and performance and all the things our community is so well known for. I see it as a very happy place," Bottini said. City Councilman Eric Garcetti said city officials are thrilled about the project, which will give the city more of the affordable housing it desperately needs. He said the project will not discriminate and will be open to any low-income elderly person. "It will be targeted toward a segment of the population that's never had affordable housing targeted to it," he said. - Low-Income Housing For Gay Seniors Opens Thursday N/A. - Housing Project For Elderly Gays Gets Approval In Philadelphia (2012):  Developers plan to break ground next month on a $20 million affordable housing project for elderly gays now that it has received the necessary state, federal and local approvals and funding has been secured, officials said Thursday. The project, planned for a section of Philadelphia’s downtown affectionately known as the Gayborhood, had long been stalled before receiving tax credits earlier this year from the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency.- Gay and Lesbian Concerns: Housing (2001): While many older gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered persons choose to keep their identification a private matter, there is a growing acceptance of variations in life styles. Many senior services have welcoming policies and make these policies known. When considering a housing-relocation decision, the following questions may help you determine how comfortable a particular housing environment might be for you: ... - Senior Center for LGBT Elders (2004, Cleveland): At 71, Ray Leuenberger finally found a senior center where he feels comfortable talking about his male partner of 10 years. The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Senior Center is important for a generation of gays and lesbians who lived through years of discrimination, said Ron Hill, executive director of the Western Reserve Area Agency on Aging. Hill said gay and lesbian seniors do not usually go to centers and are reluctant to seek services they need...The senior center convenes Wednesdays and Fridays at the Lesbian Gay Community Center in Cleveland . It should move into its own space next door early this year, said Jack Hart, interim co-executive director.

Being Out at 65: Gay retirement communities are catching on fast (2003): Nature has it fixed so that women often outlive their husbands. So it's no surprise to find the gender ratio skewed to female at most retirement communities. Stroll the grounds at one such vibrant development near Fort Myers, Fla., and you're apt never to even see a man. But that doesn't stop its 300 female residents from enjoying busy social lives, competing in tennis by day and partying it up at dances in the evenings. That's because these women are part of the first predominantly lesbian retirement community of its size in the U.S. "I still have to pinch myself that this isn't a dream," says Mary Jeanne Walsh, a retired Chase Manhattan bank vice president who moved into her attractive two-bedroom home three years ago. "When I was younger, I never would have imagined a place like this existed." - Lesbians Welcome: Kitsap Fits Bill for a New Kind of Elderly Housing (2007): The social work Ph.D.s and University of Washington lecturers have been life partners for about 15 years. They're in the process of building KitsHarbour, a independent living cooperative overlooking Port Orchard Bay in the Illahee area near Bremerton for women aged 55 to 78. The scenic home is open to all women, but lesbians are especially welcome. 

Closets are for clothes, not for seniors (2007): Hoping to “revolutionize senior housing,” three openly gay housing specialists announced today the opening this fall of one of the country’s first urban independent-living communities for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) seniors—in the historic landmarked Lake Merritt Hotel. The project, Barbary Lane Communities at Lake Merritt, takes its name from the address of the lively community in the book “Tales of the City” by San Francisco novelist Armistead Maupin... Twenty-two years ago as a young gay man struggling for acceptance in the Midwest, I first read about such an embracing community in Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City. But it was only a fictional place called Barbary Lane. Many of us moved to the Bay Area in search of such a community. I never imagined that 22 years later I would be meeting with Armistead Maupin and discussing how similar our shared visions were about what such a community could mean for our LGBT seniors. Today is the first chapter in that fiction becoming a reality here at Barbary Lane Communities.  - Gay seniors to get a place of their own(2007, Word Download): Housing units target underserved community of older homosexuals... The launch of the Barbary Lane project — so named after the diverse fictional community of Barbary Lane in author Armistead Maupin's "Tales of the City" novels — was announced at a news conference Tuesday at the hotel. Maupin himself attended the event, and a large rainbow flag was draped in the hotel's big plate-glass window overlooking Lake Merritt. Developers hope to complete the project in the fall. Applications are now being accepted to lease the 46 proposed units.
"I'm an old guy myself," Maupin said. "So I've been thinking about what retirement will mean to the world's first openly gay generation. Most of us spent the first quarter of our lives in hiding, and we have no intention of going back in hiding for the last." - Lesbian and Gay Retirement Communities (2007): Here in the Bay Area this new trend in senior housing is being celebrated with last week’s opening of the Barbary Lane Communities at Lake Merritt in Oakland. The independent living community is one of a handful that is geared towards the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community. In many ways it is no surprise that the progressive and welcoming Bay Area is one of the handful of locations to house such a community; however, many more are popping up all over America, including some decidedly “red” states.


LGBT seniors carry additional worries when seeking care facilities (2013): For a subset of seniors, another question must be asked that goes to the core of their being: How would they be treated if people knew they’re lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender? Many don’t want to take a chance on finding out. “So many people, when they go into a nursing home, they’ve got to go back into the closet because they’re not going to be treated well by the people whom they live with,” said Kee Holt, center services manager at Resource Center Dallas, a community center that serves the LGBT population. “If people who are your age and whom you’re living with don’t accept you, then it’s awfully hard.” - LGBT retirement communities grow in popularity in spite of economic challenges (2010): Even with the growing popularity of LGBT-specific retirement communities, developers and organizers still face challenges that can cripple building efforts. Finances are the first and biggest hurdle developers must jump over... "For the low income, obviously there’s no money in it, so if you’re a for-profit developer this is not what you want to do," said Mark Supper, executive director of GLEH... The 104-unit building consists of mixed and lower income housing, with 34 percent designated for seniors with HIV/AIDS or those who are homeless. GLEH’s development is the model for the future groundbreaking of other affordable housing communities for LGBT elders throughout the country. "It took three years to really kind of create the model, what works and what doesn’t work. We’re right now searching for land in and outside of California," said Supper. - Gay seniors struggling to find 'safe' retirement housing (2013): Inclusive projects developing slowly in public and private sectors... Located on the doorstep of Church Wellesley Village, Canada's largest LGBT community, Fudger House became a pioneer in the transition to inclusive housing when the City of Toronto designated it an LGBT-positive environment in 2004. Toronto Long-Term Care Homes and Services, which oversees 10 municipal homes including Fudger House, is one of the first municipal departments to introduce an inclusive long-term care initiative...
A 2010 report by the City of Vancouver's social policy division found LGBT seniors face issues not experienced by their heterosexual counterparts, making it more difficult for them to navigate the long-term care system. "Some seniors have been closeted their entire lives and fear coming out, some have been rejected by their families and some are experiencing discrimination and homophobia in various settings, including within the home support and residential care systems," the report found.

Residential Programs Expand for LGBT Older Adults in Canada (2013): Located on the doorstep of Church Wellesley Village, Canada’s largest LGBT community, Fudger House became a pioneer in the transition to inclusive housing when the City of Toronto designated it an LGBT-positive environment in 2004. - Gay seniors complex urged for Halifax site (2010): A community group in Halifax is hoping a vacant church will be replaced with a seniors complex that will focus on welcoming gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered seniors. St. John's United Church, on the corner of Windsor and Willow streets in Halifax, has been vacant for two years. Some members of the congregation have applied to the City of Halifax for permission to tear down the building and replace it with a seniors residence complex — to be named Spirit Place. "GLBT-positive is the way that we would say it," said Louisa Horne, a Spirit Place board member. "In all aspects of the complex — while we are welcoming and open and celebrating the diversity of our community and wanting to reflect that diversity — that will be a specific designation." Horne said no one from the gay and transgendered community is turned away from traditional nursing-care homes, but she said life is different for them. "I liken it a little bit to, perhaps, something that we might hear about in the American military. Sort of a 'Don't ask, don't tell' situation for many folks." 

Innovative $250m gay retirement community plans unveiled in California could help combat ageism and age discrimination by defying age stereotypes (2011): The development planned for the Southern California desert wants to prove that aging gracefully can include community, culture, and breathtaking architecture. After three years studying aging and design, architect Matthias Hollwich uncovered a disturbing truth. "Age discrimination is really prevalent in our society," he says. "Plus, you are actually discriminating against something you will be in your own future." The New York-based principal of Hollwich Kushner, who also co-founded the architect networking site Architizer, thinks architecture can help by creating inspiring, community-oriented spaces where retirees are empowered to give back to society. His new project BOOM, a $250 million development planned for the Palm Springs area that's coordinated by Hollwich's firm, is banking on the fact that hundreds of aging, creative boomers -- many of them part of the local gay community -- will move here to do it... And while catering to active older people with non-traditional draws like a "rooftop disco" -- insert visions of Cocoon in the desert --- there are some issues with designing what's essentially a theme park for gay retirees. I'm guessing that healthy, young tourists likely won't want to spend their vacation staying at a retirement home, even if they're welcome, and locals might not want to do their shopping at a nursing home, where extensive healthcare facilities -- however well-designed -- are so prevalent. There's also the possibility that many potential straight residents who are interested in the design won't feel comfortable in a community driven by gay culture. Still, if what Hollwich is saying is true, the residents themselves can mold this diverse community into their own version of a gently-graying utopia. Time will tell if it's BOOM or BUST.

Elephant Graveyards: Gay Aging and Gay Ageism in the Year 2000 (1999, Alternate Link): As one 45-year-old lesbian friend of mine puts it, we are "the age group that dare not speak its name." In recent years, as I passed 60, I have pondered the shabby treatment that our "community" metes out to old people, and wondered why our needs are so invisible to our own kind... But the gay world is twice as callous, in my opinion. At a recent awards ceremony, when an aging pioneer activist had trouble wrestling his walker to the podium, no one got up to help him. There was this long horrible silence as the awardwinner struggled his way up some impossible steps to the stage. Some people in the black-tie crowd actually snickered. The friend who witnessed this incredible incident told me, "It was one of those moments that made me ashamed to be gay." Our "community" is now half a century old, if you start counting from those pioneer activists of the World War II era. By now we might have achieved some collective maturity...but often I wonder just now mature we are. We brag a lot about "gay culture." "Cultural maturity" includes respect for elders. Historically, the real communities do cherish their elders, because that is how they roll over collective wisdom and experience to the next generation. To qualify as a community, the "gay community" should have been creating its own safety net for old people, similar to the one it did create for PWA's during the early AIDS epidemic. In this way, we would ensure our cultural immortality, as well as lifelong medical dignity and economic security right in our own world.

Unequal Treatment for GLBT Seniors Limits Quality of Life - Long Term Care Facilities Discriminate Against 'Deviants' - Homophobia & Neglect are Widespread in Nursing Homes (2000): Homophobic and heterosexist services and policies are exacerbated by the ageism and social isolation that elders often face within the GLBT community itself. GLBT media and activists often ignore old people and their concerns, and social institutions tend to be age-segregated. Ageism permeates our language, as in the characterization of older hang-outs as "wrinkle rooms." "Most of the gay and lesbian organizations go about their plans, totally insensitive, and without thinking [they] exclude us," says 77-year-old Vera Martin, a founding leader of Old Lesbians Organizing for Change. "We have a lot to share. Our life experiences can be a map for those coming behind us." Activists like Martin have created several gay-specific service organizations for GLBT elders. Senior Action in a Gay Environment, Pride Senior Network, Gay & Lesbian Outreach to Elders, and others provide services to GLBT elders and have pushed groups like NGLTF to do meaningful work on aging issues. To support these efforts, the GLBT community must examine its own ageism, value its older members, and recognize their unique concerns. GLBT activists must address aging issues, and also demand that the needs of GLBT seniors be incorporated into the work of mainstream aging organizations. Engaging aging policy is not just the right thing to do. It's also in our self-interest. After all, with luck we'll all be old and gray someday.

Aging gay population fuels new housing market: Nearly a dozen specialized developments up and running nationwide (2006). - Retirement homes, without the closets: Market widens for gay Baby Boomers seeking a comfortable place to grow old (2005). - Diversity: Sexual Orientation in Home and Community Care (2007, PDF): This In Focus looks at the challenges of providing home and community care for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transsexual/ transgendered people and communities, their friends, families and caregivers... Just as ethnoracial communities are internally diverse, LGBT communities are similarly diverse. Presently there is limited research exploring how race, religion, ethnicity interact with sexual orientation to complicate the provision of home and community care to LGBT individuals. - Family caregiving responsibilities among lesbians and gay men (1999): This study examines the full range of family care responsibilities among lesbians and gay men, including caring for children and adults with an illness or disability. Thirty-two percent of the gay men and lesbians in this study were providing some type of caregiving assistance. Lesbians, compared with gay men, were significantly more likely to be caring for children and elderly people, whereas gay men were more likely to be assisting working-age adults with an illness or disability. -

Fla. church plans gay seniors center (2002). - GLBT seniors can enjoy new retirement communities (1999): Experts sing the praises of careful financial planning for retirement, but it's just as important to plan a place to live. For gay seniors, the traditional options often don't work. Couples who have been together for years could be forced to go into the closet if they enter traditional retirement communities, and if nursing home care is needed, they could be forced to separate if they need different levels of care. Single men can find themselves forced back into the closet by a retirement community's assumptions that he is a widower looking for a new (female) love interest.  -  Gay and Lesbian Seniors: Findings - Canada N/A. - For Older Gays, A Welcoming Place (2001): After reading about a Boston-based group called the Prime Timers for older gay or bisexual men, Charles attended a few meetings. But the drive to Boston grew tiresome, so he formed Vintage Pride, which welcomes senior gay, bisexual and transsexual men and women. Meetings are held on the second Saturday of each month at the Hartford Community Center, 1841 Broad St., which is sponsored by Project 100 Inc. The center also is home to the Gay and Lesbian Health Collective, Metropolitan Community Church, the Pride City Players theatrical group and The Living Center, which serves people with HIV/AIDS. Project 100 President Roy Moechel supports the idea of Vintage Pride and offered a place to meet. "Years ago, we were in the closet, and we got married and did what we needed to do," Moechel said. "There are still a lot of seniors out there in their 60s and 80s who need this type of outlet. They can be comfortable with their actions here, and that's very important." To reach older people in the gay community, Charles sent fliers to nursing homes, senior housing complexes and newspapers. 

Gay seniors struggle to find safe homes (2002):  Stonewall will be developed at an undetermined site in the middle of Boston, allowing residents to remain integrated in an urban area. Planned amenities include an on-site pharmacy, hair salon and a medical practice staffed by gay and lesbian health-care experts. While welcomed by gay advocates, communities such as Stonewall are likely too expensive for many elders, said Peg Byron, a spokeswoman for the Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, a national organization working for the civil rights of homosexuals.
- Housing urged for gay elders (2001): Gay and lesbian senior citizens in Massachusetts are calling for publicly subsidized elderly housing built specifically for them, saying they face homophobia and are often forced to go back into the closet when they move into traditional elderly complexes and nursing homes. A report to be released today by a consortium of advocates for the elderly, gays and lesbians, says men and women who came out in the 1970s and 1980s and have lived their lives openly now find themselves increasingly dependent and fearful of revealing their sexual identity. "For people who find themselves in elder housing, whether it's public housing or otherwise, they often feel it's just not safe for them to be out" of the closet, said David Aronstein, committee member and president of Stonewall Communities, which is seeking a site for a gay and lesbian elderly housing development in Boston.

Have a Gay Old Time: Nursing Home to Set Up Specialized Unit (2007): A Chelsea non-profit is planning to build what could be the nation’s first skilled-nursing home for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender elders. The Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home Foundation next year hopes to start construction on a $26 million nursing-home complex in which some of the units will specialize in taking care of elderly people with specific diseases and specialized needs. Two of the 10 buildings within the complex will offer skilled-nursing care for only those suffering from Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS), while two others will offer nursing-home spots for the blind and those suffering from multiple sclerosis. And one 10-bedroom unit will provide for elderly residents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender, also known as “LGBT,” said the foundation’s executive director.  - Nursing Home to Include Gay Seniors (2007): Now, at least one non-profit group is planning to build what could be the nation’s first skilled-nursing home for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender seniors. The Boston-area Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home Foundation says it hopes to start construction on a $26 million nursing-home complex next year in which some of the units will specialize in taking care of the elderly with specific diseases and specialized needs, including a 10-bedroom unit geared for elderly residents who are also gay. - Openhouse: a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco established in 1998 dedicated to creating and sustaining a senior residential community that honors lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) seniors.

GLBT Retirement Communities (2003): There are six communities in the United States, however, none offer skilled care, but rather focus on independent living services. - GLBT seniors can enjoy new retirement communities. - Gay Seniors Want Housing Communities of Their Own (2002): "It really isn't any different from any other place, except you wish it were different," she said of her apartment at The Manning House. "It would be much more comfortable living in an area where there are a lot of gays." As baby boomers age, the need for gay senior housing is growing, advocates say. Without it, they say, older gays are forced back into the closet to avoid discrimination in traditional housing, where people are generally assumed to be straight. Being comfortable in their home is particularly important to older people, said Mary Thorndell, executive director of the Gay and Lesbian Association of Retired Persons. Gay elders worry more about being neglected by medical personnel or insulted because they're more vulnerable, she said.  - Policy Recommendations [related to elderly gay, lesbian, and bisexual individuals] submitted to the White House Conference on Aging (1994): For the first time in its history, the White House Conference on Aging (WHCoA) has included gay men and lesbians as a "special population" in its draft agenda and is considering policy recommendations recently submitted by AS2Vs Lesbian and Gay Aging Issues Network (LGAIN). The recommendations submitted to the White House Conference on Aging (reprinted in full on page 4) seek to ensure equal access to aging services for gay and lesbian elders. They call for funding for professional education to increase tinderstanding and sensitivity, broadening the scope of the targeting provisions of the Older American Act (OAA) and, more broadly, including "gay men and lesbians" as a category in all non-discriminational funding. LGAIN has also recommended healthcare prevention and education policies that address the particular risk factors of gay and lesbian elders, specifically calling attention to the higher risk of breast cancer, AIDS and substance abuse among lesbian and gay elders.  

Caregiving Real Life Story: Elder Care For Gays, Lesbians Catches On (2005):  In many regards, RainbowVision is your typical "after 50" kind of place. It has a mixture of independent-living units, assisted-living units and state-of-the-art medical care for the extremely aged and infirm. There is a social director, a dining facility and residents who range in age from 50 to 94. And the community has been built in the kind of beautiful setting - on the edge of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains - that makes a lifetime of saving for retirement seem worthwhile. But the 146-unit facility is also unique. It is marketed to gay retirees and elderly as a place to spend the remainder of their lives among people who will not judge them for their lifestyles or life partners. It not only will have gourmet cooking classes, but also rowdy drag queen shows and gay pride parades. And it is seen less as a place to quietly savor the golden years than as a place to savor the very way of life that many of the residents have spent decades fighting to have society see as acceptable.

Gay seniors' home (2002, SF): Gay men and women flock to San Francisco for its progressive lifestyle, tolerant people and flourishing gay community. But when it comes time to retire, many gay seniors say San Francisco lets them loose from its warm embrace. The Bay Area is so expensive that many gay seniors have to move elsewhere and suddenly find themselves snubbed and even hated outside the city's unique sphere of tolerance. Retirement homes can be even more hostile, according to gay seniors and their advocates. Many nursing-home residents who grew up when homosexuality was considered a crime and a mental illness still look down on gay and lesbian peers. Some staff members reject and mistreat them, gay seniors say..." - Gay Senior Home Draws Criticism (2002, SF): With its panoramic views of San Francisco and subsidized rent, the proposed Rainbow Adult Housing complex sounds like a place any senior citizen would want to live. However, only certain seniors are welcome. "It's (for) bisexuals and transgendered, who by the way can be heterosexual people, but queer identified. It's gay and lesbian, and it's our friends and family that are accepting of us," said Jim Mitulski, executive director of the Rainbow community. "That is discrimination and we are subsidizing discrimination," said Republican state Sen. Ray Haynes, who added that gay politicians in Sacramento are finding ways to funnel public dollars into projects that discriminate against straight people. - Rainbow Gardens Stay at Home Assisted Living (From 2000 to 2010): Our foremost mission is to develop safe, dependable and reliable stay-at-home, family-centered assisted living services for elderly gays and lesbians, and for family and friends of lesbians and gays.

Exploring the Impact of Sexual Orientation on Experiences and Concerns about End of Life Care and on Bereavement for Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Older People (2010): This article explores how sexual orientation1 may impact on concerns about, and experiences of, end of life care and bereavement within same-sex relationships. We draw on exploratory data from four focus groups with lesbian and gay elders ( N = 15), which formed part of a larger project investigating a range of older people’s concerns about end of life care. We set the findings in the context of debates about broader changes to family forms within late modernity, alongside social change and demographic shifts. Our focus on end of life care and bereavement sheds light on a series of relatively neglected issues associated with lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) ageing and, more broadly, the topics of care and support within ‘non-traditional’ intimate relationships and personal networks. We point to the importance of further research into the lives of older lesbians and gay men facing issues of end of life care and bereavement.

Elder co-housing project is aimed at gay women (2007): When they were younger, Nancy Nystrom and her friends joked about one day living together in a home for old lesbians. But as they aged, the joke grew less funny. Lesbian women and gay men often go back in the closet in later life, fearing discrimination and even abuse if they need care.Why wasn't there a special place for them? Soon there will be, on a quiet, wooded hillside in Bremerton. - Lesbians Welcome: Kitsap Fits Bill for a New Kind of Elderly Housing (2007): It seems perfectly obvious to Nancy Nystron and Teresa Jones: Kitsap County is the perfect place to conduct a social science experiment. The social work Ph.D.s and University of Washington lecturers have been life partners for about 15 years. They're in the process of building KitsHarbour, a independent living cooperative overlooking Port Orchard Bay in the Illahee area near Bremerton for women aged 55 to 78. The scenic home is open to all women, but lesbians are especially welcome. - Cohousing for lesbians planned in Bremerton (2007): In recent years, elderly cohousing has gained ground as aging baby boomers head into retirement. Nystrom and her partner, Teresa Jones, have taken it a step further with plans for a version that caters to lesbians.

The Gay & Lesbian Elder Housing (2013, LA, GLEH, With Video): Mission is to improve the life experience of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender seniors by developing affordable housing, providing comprehensive care, and ensuring, through advocacy and education, a brighter future for the LGBT elder community... Affordable Housing Developer: GLEH is the premier developer of affordable housing for low-income seniors and is particularly committed to meeting the growing needs of the LGBT and HIV/AIDS communities. The success of our first development Triangle Square - Hollywood has placed GLEH on the map. Built with the commitment of socially conscious housing developer  McCormack, Baron and Salazar, this landmark building is the result of a partnership that is highly respected and seen as a model for future collaborations to meet the needs of the aging and highly vulnerable senior community. Triangle Square - Hollywood is the nation’s first affordable low-income housing development with a focus on LGBT elders 62 and over. It serves as the flagship for GLEH's future developments, as well as a model for the standard of care that can be provided nationally. - Coming Home (2007): At the nation's first affordable-housing complex for LGBT seniors, created with public and private support, LA-area elders have a place to call their own. At first glance, Triangle Square is just the latest apartment complex opening in rapidly gentrifying Hollywood, the fabled Los Angeles neighborhood that is emerging from the decades of malaise to become a thriving urban center.  The lobby looks like the interior of a W Hotel; the famed intersection Hollywood and Vine (site of a future W Hotel) is two blocks away; and two upscale commercial projects built over the past five years sit just to the south.  But Triangle Square is a different kind of apartment building: Thanks to local, state, and federal support, it's the nation's first multicultural affordable housing development for LGBT seniors. -

New Mexico Gears Up For Gay Seniors (2004) (Alternate Link): A suburban Santa Fe subdivision that would cater to retirement-age gays and lesbians is moving forward, along with a condominium project for LGBT seniors what will have assisted living facilities, an indication of the state's growing popularity as a gay retirement center. An attempt by neighbors of the Birds of a Feather Community to derail the subdivision failed this week in the New Mexico Supreme Court.  The homeowners, who said the project was exclusionary and illegal under the state human rights law, went to the high court after a lower court turned them down. The Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal of a decision by county officials to let developers go ahead with plans for the project. - Outing the Issue: Gay and lesbian residents are seeing the development of long-term care communities marketed for them—and opportunities for existing ones to make them feel more welcome. - L.A. to subsidize 'gay' retirement home: Project in Hollywood said to be 1st in U.S. financed by a city (2004): A few retirement facilities around the country are set apart for homosexuals, but the $18 million project is believed to be the first financially supported by a city, according to the Gay Financial Network, or GFN. The 103-unit complex is a joint effort of the city of Los Angeles, the non-profit Gay & Lesbian Elder Housing Corp. and St. Louis-based developer McCormack Baron Salazar. The plan is to break ground in the spring and open in 2005 on city-owned land a few blocks from the famed Hollywood Boulevard, GFN said.

Categories and their consequences: Understanding and supporting the caring relationships of older lesbian, gay and bisexual people (2011): This article advocates incorporating biographical narratives into social work practice involving older lesbian, gay and bisexual service users. Offering a critique of ‘sexuality-blind’ conditions in current policy and practice, the discussion draws on qualitative data to illustrate the potential benefits of narrative approaches for both practitioners and service users.

Grant JM, et al. (2010). Outing Age 2010: Public Policy Issues Affecting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Elders. National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute. PDF Download. Download Page. The scenario of LGBT adults being forced back into the closet for safety in hostile elder environments is alarming and disgraceful. The Task Force will ensure that Outing Age 2010 doesn’t sit on a shelf, but informs key breakthroughs and advancements in advocacy. All of us must work together to compel the federal government, the states, aging agencies and service providers, local communities, and public health and housing programs to step up to the challenge of meeting the vast, unmet needs of LGBT elders. We must accept nothing less... When the Task Force published Outing Age in 2000, we brought attention to the reality that LGBT-affirming and LGBT-specifi c elder programs were all but non-existent. A decade later, most of the principal barriers to healthy, empowered aging detailed in the first edition of Outing Age persist. - Finding the Solution to Better Care for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Elders (2011): A new book from the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force offers a comprehensive look at the challenges facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender older adults in the United States – and lays out the national, state and local policy reforms needed to address these challenges... Cultural Competence Training. To date, only one LGBT-targeted retirement community – the for-profit RainbowVision in Santa Fe – offers assisted living units. As a consequence, virtually all LGBT older adults throughout the United States who find that they require a residential setting offering 24-hour formal care are obligated to move into assisted living facilities designed for the general population. Given that mainstream residential and care settings and providers are largely ill-informed about the needs of their LGBT clients and residents, mandated trainings and significant changes in policies and practices are essential to ensure that assisted living facilities provide culturally competent care to LGBT elders.

Sánchez A, Cream City Foundation (2011). Wisconsin’s Elder Readiness: A Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Lens. Milwaukee, WI: Cream City Foundation. PDF Download. Recommendations: Based on the review and analysis of this study as well as information obtained from other regional and national studies, Cream City Foundation offers the following recommendations to service providers and policy makers:... Service Providers:  • Recognize that even though you maynot have been told or cannot see LGBT individuals, they are in your communities. Demographic extrapolations suggest that there are more LGBT older adults in Wisconsin than older adults representing any other minority community in the State.  Provide cultural competence training for working with LGBT older adults and ensure a basic understanding of sexual orientation and gender identity. Make sure that training does not assume a homogeneous LGBT population and is sensitive to differences, such as race, religion, ethnicity and class.  Understand that older LGBT individuals may have experienced fear and discrimination in past encounters with service providers. They may need encouragement and understanding to feel safe to fully participate in programs.  Do not assume that being LGB or T is a problem in itself. Treat the whole person and their situation and recognize partners and families of choice.  Make referrals as appropriate to specialized services in the community that serve LGBT clients regardless of age.  Be a welcoming and affirming agency. All written materials and forms should be gender neutral and include language that allows for different family configurations.

Lambda Legal (2011). LGBT Older Adults in Long-Term Care Facilities: Stories from the Field. PDF Download. The survey was conducted online over a period of eight months, from October 2009 through June 2010. The findings speak only to the experiences of the survey respondents... Recommendations: This report is part of a much larger national conversation about fair treatment, dignity and respect for sexual orientation and gender identity, and compassionate care for everyone. Every actor in the long-term care story can use these findings to advance that conversation and take steps in their own domains: Recommendations n Nursing home and assisted living facility operators can raise staff awareness and conduct self-assessments of their facility’s culture and quality of care. n Ombudsman programs can develop measures of resident safety and educational programs for facilities and for their programs. - Researchers can frame more in-depth studies of resident experiences. In particular, researchers can identify the sexual orientation and gender identity of survey respondents and compare the experiences of LGBT and non-LGBT residents as well as transgender residents with lesbian, gay, and bisexual residents who are not transgender. - LGBT older adults and their loved ones can use the questions in this report as a guide to help assess whether a facility is welcoming. - Policymakers can use this report to support more funding for research, more programs that train nursing home staff to provide culturally competent care, and clearer policies to protect LGBT residents. - States and local communities, especially those with human rights provisions, covering sexual orientation and/or gender identity can mandate cultural competency training and others steps to promote better care. - States and local communities can pass health or aging services regulations identifying LGBT elders as a vulnerable aging population, and they can mandate cultural competency programs for any agency receiving local funds. - State agencies on aging can help local area agencies examine their long-term care planning programs and add resources for LGBT clients and providers alike. - Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs), which are designed to provide a single point of entry into the public long-term care system, can assess their programs, the quality of information given, and their intake systems. As the nation moves toward full inclusion of LGBT people, the older adults in nursing homes and assisted living facilities across the country need to be heard and included. It is our hope that improvements won for LGBT older adults will ultimately benefit all residents in long-term care facilities, and that this report inspires action.

Donaldson, Weston (2012). Attitudes of Heterosexual Assisted Living Residents Toward Gay and Lesbian Peers. Master's Dissertation, Colorado State University. PDF Download. Sexual minorities in post-retirement care facilities fear discrimination and suboptimal care due to homophobia and heteronormative policies. This qualitative study explored the attitudes of 13 heterosexual assisted facility residents toward gay and lesbian peers in their facility. Although most participants reported that they were comfortable talking about homosexuality, the feelings, beliefs, and behaviors toward gay and lesbian residents that they described ranged from favorable, to ambivalent, to unfavorable. Results seemed to indicate that heterosexual residents still view sexual minorities as - others‖ who are unlikely to inhabit the same spaces they do. Recommendations for further research are provided in order to ameliorate the conditions of aged care facilities for all residents, including sexual minorities.

Croghan CF, et al. (2012). 2012 Twin Cities LGBT aging needs assessment survey report. PDF Download. Download Page, Other Reports Available. Many LGBT older adults still do not access the supportive services or benefits available to them, out of concern for discrimination or lack of provider cultural sensitivity. Many are low-income older adults who do not have affordable care to meet daily needs. There remains work to do before LGBT older adults have access to the same safety, security and benefits as their peers. This report shares the findings from a needs assessment that sought to learn more about LGBT individuals as they age. Comparisons in this report have been made to previous studies conducted both locally and nationally which describe the experiences of LGBT older adults and non-LGBT older adults. Compared to the general population, LGBT older adults are more likely to live alone and serve as a caregiver. They are less likely to have a caregiver or have children. Given what we know about how these factors impact people, LGBT older adults are more at risk for social isolation and nursing home placement. 

Documentary: Gen Silent (YouTube |Trailer, 2009): LGBT Elders go back into the closet to survive. - Synopsis. - Gen Silent on Facebook. - Clip from Documentary (2011): Lawrence describes his partner Alexandre’s fear that paid home care providers will know that they are gay. A special thank you to director Stu Maddux for permission to use this clip.

Social Care TV: Working with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people - older people and residential care: Roger's story: Key messages for practice: 1. Some LGBT individuals fear that by moving into residential care they will lose control of their lives and effectively return to the closet owing to the possible ‘anti-gay' beliefs of fellow residents and untrained staff.  2. Dignity, respect and inclusion are paramount for partners and carers of LGBT individuals. This can be achieved through communicating and including those deemed as ‘family' by the individual being provided for.  3. Providers should not be afraid to ask questions to determine whether an LGBT individual wants to be open about being ‘out'. This can be done by using specific language which is open and inclusive of difference.  4. Acknowledge and respect the relationship by including the loved one in the provision of care and recognising the significance of their input.

Carr S, Ross P (2013, UK). Assessing Current and Future Housing and Support Options for Older LGB People. Joseph Roundtree Foundation. PDF Download.International innovations demonstrate how formal larger-scale housing and support initiatives for older LGB people can grow from and nurture mutual and community support and friendship networks. They also show the potential of planning to include spaces for use by the wider community and support services, thereby ensuring the housing initiative is an integral part of the neighbourhood. There is an emphasis on shared values, tolerance and respect so although a living arrangement may be ‘mixed’, LGB older people set standards and remain safe and in control of the culture and environment.

The Aging LGBT Community. Presented by: LGBT Boomers and Beyond Coalition For Arizona State University Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center (SIRC) (2012, PPT Download). Presenters: Scott Hawthornthwaite – Area Agency on Aging, Region 1. Adero Allison, PhD – Transitioning Adults Plus. Chris Boutwell – One Voice Community Center. David Coon, PhD – Arizona State University. David – Prime Timers. Brett Petersen – Duet. Billie Myres – Hospice of the Valley. Moderator: Joan Zecherle – Hospice of the Valley  Presentations: LGBT Boomers and Beyond Coalition – The Beginnings. - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Issues and Family Caregiving. - LGBT Boomers and Beyond Coalition: Community Programs and Resources in Maricopa County. Some Abuse Stories: Narrative 2 - A man dying unexpectedly in the hospital had no family by his side, only his partner of 6 months. The man's family has not seen or spoken to him in over a decade. They force his partner to leave the hospital, and the man died alone without his partner, or his family. - Narrative 3 – Clay (77) and Harold (88) - Sonoma County separates a gay couple of 20 years (having all the legal paperwork to ensure their wishes are respected). Harold fell and was admitted to the hospital. The County refused to allow visitation regardless of the power of attorney, will, end of life wishes, etc. They not only separated the men, but placed Clay in a nursing home away from Harold. They then sold all of their belongings. Clay was held against his will in the home for three months, during that time Harold passed away. -

"Seniors Preparing For Rainbow Years" (SPRY) Program (Montrose Counseling Center. Houston, Texas, USA.): Provides behavioral health and and mental health support services to Gay Seniors, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender LGBT seniors who are age 60 years and older... o prepare Gay seniors, LGBT seniors for aging by helping with new physical and mental challenges such as loneliness, isolation and elderly depression...  "...to prevent LGBT seniors from going back into the closet when they age or go into a long-term care facility." Video on SPRY Program... Video Of "Seniors Preparing For Rainbow Years" Program. - SPRY WebPage.

HRC - Senior Housing: - Overview of Housing Options. - Lesbian and Gay-Friendly Housing. - Whom to Contact with Discrimination Complaints. - GLEH: Gay & Lesbian Elder Housing.

United Kingdom

Gay Manchester Remembered (2000): "It's a scathing indictment of our communities that so much importance is placed on youth - it's about time we stopped to look back on how we got here. As well as a thriving, young gay and lesbian community - Manchester also has a large and equally thriving community of older gay men and lesbians. We have a history as rich and varied as any other community. It deserves to be told." - Don't older people often say the funniest things? No, they can be bigoted, as the gay marriage debate has shown, but be kind – their views are from another time (2013): A danger for GLBT elders? - UK charity publishes guidance for care of elderly gays (2012): Stonewall provides advice and recommendations for public bodies on meeting the needs of elderly lesbian, gay and bisexual people. - Call for more LGBT training for care home staff after gay resident attempts suicide (2012): The Rainbow Lives Project, which offers diversity training for care workers, has called for more care homes to offer training after a woman attempted suicide due to homophobic bullying.

The Forgotten Elderly in Britain (2011): Ageing can be more difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals. Recent studies suggest that perceived or experienced discrimination can deter elderly LGBT people from accessing health, housing and social services that are vital in later life. As the population ages, there is a mounting need to listen to the voices of these people, and address their specific concerns. “Older LGBTs face a number of very specific problems in terms of accessing suitable housing, healthcare, and the stress of living in a minority group”, says Dr Dylan Kneale of International Longevity Centre (ILC-UK), the UK’s leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. - London charity for older LGBT people seeks volunteers (2011): Opening Doors London, the charity for older LGBT people, is seeking donations and volunteers. The service, run by Age UK, offers information, help, ‘befrienders’ and social activities for lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans people over the age of 50... “For many of the service users who attend the groups or who are being befriended by our LGBT volunteers, the service is often the only real contact they have with anyone else from week to week, much less the only contact with the LGBT community.” Opening Doors London has commissioned a short film (see below) to show how the service works, with contributions from people who use it.

Will new ITV sitcom Vicious starring Sir Ian McKellen and Sir Derek Jacobi prove a watershed for gay relationships in TV drama? (2013): “In the past gay characters in sitcoms have been figures of fun. They were funny because they were gay. But I like the fact that these characters are funny because of the people they are. That’s a real advance.” A report by the BBC last year found that examples of LGBT characters in comedy scenarios were often too reliant on outdated stereotypes. The report found that gay male representation is improving on TV, but overtly camp gay men were still depicted as the norm, especially in comedy scenarios. Doctor Who was commended for including gay character Captain Jack, whose sexuality is incidental to the plot and not the driving-force behind his actions, but the report highlighted that this was a rare portrayal of an LGBT character on television. Could Vicious, then, despite its disappointing original title of Vicious Old Queens,  open the eyes of TV commissioners and start a new trend where characters happen to be gay, rather than are typecast as “gay characters”? It is something that LGBT charity Stonewall hopes to see. - The Queen honours Gay Elderly Men’s Society in Brighton and Hove (2010): The Gay Elderly Men’s Society (GEMS) in Brighton and Hove has been announced as one of the winners of The Queen’s Award for Voluntary Service. This award is an MBE for groups of volunteers who work within their community for the benefit of others. This prestigious national award recognises outstanding voluntary contributions and sets the benchmark for excellence in volunteering.

Gay people 'at risk of a lonelier old age' (2011): Campaigners warn of looming care problem as Stonewall survey predicts health and housing crisis. - How gay people are more likely to be lonelier in their old age (2011): Gay men and women are more likely to end up living alone as they get older, according to a new report, raising the prospect of a healthcare and housing time bomb. - Plea for support for elderly gay and transgender people in Kent (2013): She added: "Some of the older people we hope to befriend will just want a cup of tea and chat on a Sunday morning. Others might be asking 'What are these civil partnerships and gay marriage things?' and how they would go about getting one." Age UK are supporting the scheme and offering training for the befriending volunteers, who must be gay themselves.
- Alzheimer's Society (2013, Fact Sheet, UK). Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual people with dementia.
 

Researching with older gay men to get their voice heard (2010):  n interesting point to emerge from the work by Age Concern (2002, 2008) is recognition that sexuality concerns lifestyle and cultural differences and is not simply related to sexual activity. This point is important because it highlights a cultural dimension to human sexuality. I suggest that health and social care providers’ knowledge and understanding of the cultural dimension of sexuality in older age can be enhanced through collaborative research work with members of the cultural groups... Research with older LGBT people is important. This population are reported to age in a heterosexual normative environment where their social and cultural differences are not acknowledged (Heaphy et al, 2004; Pugh, 2005). A heterosexual normative perspective appears to be assumed in health and social care in the United Kingdom (Sale, 2002; Heaphy et al, 2004; McNair, 2008). Research has indicated that this perspective informs the discourse of older people in general and may influence the appropriateness, or limit the support for older LGBT people (Hubbard and Rossington, 1995; Brown, 2002; Kitchen, 2003; Heaphy and Yip, 2006). According to Age Concern (2002) this discourse is; inadequate, often representing LGBT people in stereotypical ways, failing to differentiate between lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered/transsexual people. Age Concern (2002, 2008) argues that the voice of older gay men in particular is absent.

Care home for elderly Christians in gay row (2008): A care home for elderly Christians has had its council funding halted after residents refused to reveal if they were gay, lesbian or bisexual... When they refused to disclose their sexuality, the council accused the charity responsible for the home of being closed to the gay community and cut a £13,000 grant. - Elderly gay couple 'being forced out of Derry home' (2008): An elderly gay couple say they are being forced out of their home in Derry by homophobic attacks. In the latest incident, a gang threatened to burn the couple out of their house in the Creggan estate. The Rainbow Project, a support group for gay and bisexual men, says they have already endured a campaign of intimidation that has seen their windows broken, front door kicked in and car damaged. - Age Concern Comes Out at Pride London to Support Elderly Gays (2008): Age Concern made a colourful appearance at this year's London Pride parade in an effort to highlight the needs of the often hidden population of older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals (LGB). Encouraged by the success of the charity's involvement in previous Pride events, Age Concern England, Age Concern Enterprises and Local London Age Concern groups teamed up to submit a parade stopping entry into this year's procession.

Out of the closet (2001): For the elderly, support services become an essential part of life. But if you are lesbian or gay are they responsive to your needs? ... The training pack, Opening Doors, is in part a beginner's guide to homosexuality, seeking to challenge stereotyping as well as providing guidelines for best practice. Pizey sees it as a strategic tool in bringing about effective change. "We're aiming," he says, "to create a culture where people involved in caring for older people will be confident to make contact with other, gay and lesbian, organisations without being seen to be odd and where it's quite a natural thing to work with people who are lonely and isolated, no matter what their sexuality." While older gay men and lesbians share the same concerns of older straight men and women, such as money worries and deteriorating health, there are a number of crucial differences. One of the principal concerns facing older gay men and lesbians is something that today's gay generation takes for granted - the ability to be themselves and to be open about their sexuality. - Older lesbian and gay people - forgotten no more (2001): Older lesbian and gay people's issues are addressed for the first time by Age Concern England in a new publication being launched today. The aim is to bring about positive change to organisational culture and raise awareness of the existence and needs of older lesbians and gay men and to ensure that they enjoy full and equal access to services. 'Opening Doors' is the latest resource pack in a series of 24, each dealing with an aspect of services for older people. This Pack highlights Age Concern's growing role in the promotion of older lesbian and gay issues, arising from the charity's objective to be wholly inclusive, working for the benefit of all older people, and ensuring that all older people can enjoy later life.

Mapping the gay population (2000): Much of this information has never been collected before. It constitutes an essential pre-requisite for accurate targeting of the gay population with appropriate HIV prevention services. However, it will also benefit the planning of other local services. For example, the trend of migration into Brighton (for gay reasons) seems to be accelerating, and this will have clear implications for future services... All three samples share the same over-representation of younger men (between 25-35) and under-representation of very young men and older men as compared to the much flatter curve of the Census distribution... It is clear from many studies that as men grow older they have fewer sexual partners and less sex. This certainly seems to be confirmed by the fact that the sample of the estimated ages of men’s sexual partners shows an even more exaggerated under-representation of older men. - U.K. study: Older gay people feel estranged (2003): The study, from Nottingham Trent University, found that while a large number of older people feel left out from society, GLB senior citizens feel the difference the most. It claims that, because the gay world can be targeted at younger people, older homosexuals and bisexuals often feel isolated and alienated. A result of this alienation is a retreat from support groups and clubs that were usually a lifeline, the report found. - Older LGB People (2006): Older people face several issues that concern the provision of social services in the UK. Gay people are more likely to live alone when they are older (though following the implementation of the Civil Partnership Act this situation may change in time), and are more likely to be without children. There are also difficulties surrounding access to appropriate care through retirement homes, which may not be equipped or willing to support same sex partners. Many elderly lesbian and gay people are apprehensive about having to go into a nursing home, and possibly back into a situation where they do not disclose their sexual orientation. Concerns also arise regarding appropriate support and care from care workers, who may refuse to recognise extended "families" within the gay community, or may not allow a person to spend social time in a gay venue. Society assumes that LGB people are young and active; it does not occur to society that older people may be gay too. These issues inevitably have an impact on effective delivery of health care. A thorough needs assessment is necessary to establish the exact needs of older gay people.

Aspinall PJ (2009). Estimating the size and composition of the lesbian, gay, and bisexual population in Britain. Equality and Human Rights Commission: Research report 37. PDF Download. Great caution must be taken in interpreting findings from both surveys based on probabilistic samples: because of their frequent small count (base) of the LGB population, difficult to measure non-response, and frequently unmeasured misreporting or information bias; and purposive samples that incur external validity problems. Findings from both sources cannot currently be generalised to the LGB population as a whole and they are not a satisfactory basis for making comparisons with the heterosexual population or the population as a whole. At best these findings can only offer indicative evidence and great caution is needed in making any interpretation of the data that extends beyond the immediate samples in question.

Higgins A, et al. (2011). Visible Lives: Identifying the experiences and needs of older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) people in Ireland. Dublin, Ireland: Gay and Lesbian Equality Network (GLEN) Dublin. PDF Download. PDF Download. As they enter the later years of their lives, older LGBT people can be faced with a double invisibility both as older people and as LGBT people. While some of the issues facing older LGBT people may be similar to those for all older people, there is a growing awareness of the need to identify the specific issues older LGBT people face. Participants were particularly concerned that older age services may not recognise or respect their LGBT identity, may not respect their partners in decision-making or may discriminate against them as LGBT people. The participants’ stories are a powerful reminder of the importance of the legislative and social progress of the last twenty years, and the profound impact this has had on their lives and on LGBT people more generally. In particular, the introduction of the Civil Partnership Act in 2010 has radically increased the rights and responsibilities, and the social status, of lesbian and gay couples, especially in areas crucial for older couples such as pensions, health care, social welfare and taxation. This progress is a strong platform from which the recommendations made in this report can be implemented.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender older people in Ireland: Mental health issues (2013): The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences and needs of LGBT people over the age of 55 years living in Ireland and this article reports on specific mental health issues. Mixed methods were used involving 144 surveys and 36 semi-structured in-depth interviews. The findings revealed that a significant number of the survey respondents had experienced a mental health problem at some point in their lives with interview participants providing further details of their concerns. It is recommended that policy makers address the mental health needs of older LGBT people in future strategic directives and develop standards of care that support the principles of equality, inclusion and respect for diversity.

Carr S, Ross P (2013, UK). Assessing Current and Future Housing and Support Options for Older LGB People. Joseph Roundtree Foundation. PDF Download. This Viewpoint shows that independence and staying in control are crucially important for older LGB people now and for those thinking about their future older age. These factors relate to feeling safe, maintaining identity, personal dignity, privacy and respect for relationships and preferences. For LGB older people now and in the future, independence does not mean isolation or being alone. Maintaining links with affirmative communities of identity (particularly LGB communities), friendship networks and ‘chosen family’ are vital. Currently mainstream services are not offering LGB people the type of safe, welcoming accommodation and support they need. Personalisation determines that people are individuals who should have choices and citizens to whom services are accountable. However, in the u K at present ‘mixed’ or specialist options for LGB older people are as yet rare or non-existent. The EHRC see the provision of housing and support to older LGB people as a ‘litmus test’ for all minority groups (Ward et al. , 2010).

Wathern, Tina (2013). Building a sense of community: Including older LGBT in the way we develop and deliver housing with care. London, England: Housing Learning & Improvement Network. PDF Download. Download Page. Set against a backdrop of an increasingly ageing population and a time of growing awareness of the housing with care needs of an older population, we set out to provide a viewpoint reflecting the needs and wants of the marginalised older LGBT community. Little is said of older people’s sexual orientation and even less about those older people that are LGBT. Engaging and involving older LGBT groups in the development of housing, particularly housing with care, has often been on an opportunistic, sometimes ad hoc basis. Much of the current debate about care and housing is centred around the personalisation/commissioning agenda and providers of these services have often been slow to respond or recognise the diverse nature of their client/customer focus. It is therefore no surprise that older LGBT people do not feel considered in the wider housing debate and can feel that they are missing out on choices that are available to other sections of the older population. In addition to the housing challenges that face us all as we age, there are particular challenges that face older LGBT people, who are more likely to live alone and less likely to have children or extended family networks they can call on for support. Some are reluctant to explore support from formal housing, health or social care providers because of a historic fear of discrimination. Mindful of the political debate about personalisation and future care funding, we intend this document to provide a viewpoint that will offer a variety of ways in which the voices and needs of the older LGBT communities can be included in the development and provision of inclusive housing with care.

Advertiser’s Feature: Elderly care in the gay community (2012): Care and support services are increasingly run by the private sector; Mr Dillon is gay and says that his views on isolation, segregation and equality of recognition have shaped the business. The Directors of ReassureCare want the company to reflect the cultural mix they’ve grown up with and been a part of.
.. When it comes to people with dementia, it is the partner or spouse who approaches ReassureCare for support. They want an organisation that reflects the values and diversity they grew up with. Director of Care Bobbie Mama says: “To date our clients pay directly for their care. ReassureCare though would definitely welcome clients with a Personal Budget provided through their local council.”
 - Gay elderly more likely to rely on private pensions: Stonewall (2012). - Michael Brown talks about the Gay Rights Movement (2012): In the run up to Pride 2012, we spoke to 79-year-old Michael Brown about his involvement with the Gay Rights Movement since 1954, the specific issues that the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) community face in later life, and his thoughts on Pride... What specific issues do members of the LBGT community face in later life, that other older people don’t? 110,000 older gay men have criminal convictions from the time when homosexuality was illegal, and they’re nearly all in the closet, because they still feel fear and shame from that period. Many are married and they have a lot to lose if anyone knew about them. They’re also fearful of how they’ll be treated in housing, health services, and hospitals.

Ward R, Pugh S, Price E (2010). Don’t look back? Improving health and social care service delivery for older LGB users. Manchester, England: Equality and Human Rights Commission. PDF Download. Very little data exists that compares LGB and heterosexual populations. The evidence is even more limited for older LGB people. The existing evidence suggests that LGB people face many of the same issues as other members of society when ageing, including health and care concerns, however, their experiences and needs are mediated through a range of forms of disadvantage and discrimination related to their sexual orientation, and other aspects of their identities. Understanding how this affects the lives of older LGB people, and what it may mean to be older and LGB when accessing health and social care is at the heart of this paper. The paper demonstrates how older LGB people have been overlooked in health and social care legislation, policy, research, guidance and practice which assume service users are heterosexual. The existing evidence points to discrimination and anticipation of negative treatment when older LGB people access services. Particular health and social care issues require greater attention and action: for example older LGB people may be likely to have different mental health needs to their heterosexual peers; some older gay men may become infected with HIV in their 50s or 60s, or are already living with it, and we know that older adults may present later than their younger counterparts for a diagnosis. Older adults appear to be a rising proportion of the overall population diagnosed with HIV, therefore prevention programmes will need to include older people, including gay men. LGB high level service users who are frail and depend upon care services, and LGB carers, have received the least attention, along with people with dementia or people requiring end of life care. The potential exists for the provision of care and support to older LGB people to become a ‘litmus test’ – an indicator for how well health and social care agencies engage with minority groups and deliver a non-discriminatory service that works for service users.

Taylor, James (2012). Working with older lesbian, gay and bisexual people: A Guide for Care and Support Services. Download Page. PDF Download. Stonewall, UK. Older lesbian, gay and bisexual people want many of the same things in later life as heterosexual older people. This includes staying in their own homes for as long as possible and being treated with respect and dignity when they access health and care services. Stonewall research has shown that half of older gay people feel their sexual orientation has, or will have, a negative effect on getting older. Gay people are much more likely than heterosexual people to face the prospect of living alone with limited personal help from their families and therefore are more likely to rely on formal services for support in later life. Many older gay people express considerable worries about the future – about having to hide their sexual orientation, about having to move into a care home that is designed for heterosexual people and about a lack of opportunity to socialise with other older gay people.

NHS: National End of Life Care Programme (2012). The route to success in end of life care – achieving quality for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. Download Page. PDF Download. This guide has been developed following consultation with stakeholders at a series of discussion groups held around the country. It offers guidance and advice for those working with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, and for LGBT people themselves, whether giving or receiving end of life care. It provides case studies, key recommendations and issues for health and social care professionals to consider, such as: ... The report calls for organisations and the people within them to have an LGBT-friendly culture and use education and training to positively address communication skills and attitudes. It urges organisations to have a clear confidentiality policy, involve LGBT people in services and promote the use of inclusive language at the end of life, with phrases that do not inadvertently make someone feel like they must reveal their sexual orientation and gender identity.

NHS North West, The Lesbian & Gay Foundation (2012). Everything you always wanted to know about sexual orientation monitoring... but were afraid to ask. Download Page. PDF Download. The workbook aims to encourage public sector organisations to take the lead in implementing sexual orientation monitoring, by highlighting the benefits for organisations, staff and service users. This workbook by NHS North West and The Lesbian & Gay Foundation makes use of case studies and examples from the work of the NHS and wider public sector research to offer a step-by-step guide to the process of sexual orientation monitoring, illustrated with best practice examples and real-life case studies. It also highlights the risks you need to think about and minimise when starting to carry out sexual orientation monitoring... The workbook highlights that investing in equality makes good business sense, as understanding the needs of staff and service users leads to more targeted and successful work, saving money in the long run. We believe that this guide is the first of its kind. Although the contributions have been largely from the NHS and the police, we think the guide is relevant to all public sector organisations. This guide was produced by NHS North West in partnership with The Lesbian & Gay Foundation.

Jones K, Fenge L-A, Read R, Cash M (2013). Collecting Older Lesbians' and Gay Men's Stories of Rural Life in South West England and Wales: "We Were Obviously Gay Girls ... (So) He Removed His Cow From Our Field." Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 14(2), Article 7. PDF Download. The emerging recollections, perceptions and storied biographies of older lesbians and gay men and their experiences in rural Britain are presented in the article, alongside consideration of the multiple qualitative methodologies used in a unique multi-method participatory action research project. The project aimed to empower older lesbians and gay men in rural areas through a collaborative design and meaningful participation in the research process itself. Methods included the core Biographic Narrative Interpretive Method (BNIM) (JONES, 2001, 2004; WENGRAF, 2001) with its interpretation of data by panels of citizens. In addition, visual ethnographic site visits, a focus group and two days of theatrical improvisation of interview data to explore action within the texts were used. The project embraced the principles of a performative social science (GERGEN & JONES, 2008; JONES, 2006, 2012) in its dissemination plan. Four of the collected stories are elaborated on here. These and other stories, reports and observations contributed to the creation of the main output of the project = a short professionally made film (Rufus Stone). The film is used to encourage community dialogue and inform service providers, opening up new possibilities of connectivity, communication and common ground at both macro and micro levels.

International Longevity Centre (2011). Celebrating Intergenerational Diversity Among LGBT People. Download Page. Executive Summary: PDF Download. Word Download. Between Autumn 2010 and Spring 2011, three intergenerational projects took place that were among the first of their kind in the UK context. These projects aimed to promote solidarity and improved relations between different generations of the LGBT community. In Camden, arts workshops were held aimed at challenging stereotypes and social isolation. The project in Leicester used interviews conducted by younger participants to gather and record personal histories of older LGBT individuals. In Stockport different generations of LGBT people were involved in developing local policies, including raising their issues and experiences with local service providers. The projects aimed to share and learn new skills, improve understanding between younger and older people, foster mutual support and celebrate LGBT heritage.

Potter C, Bamford S-M, Kneale D (2011, International Longevity Centre - UK). Bridging the gap: Exploring the potential for bringing older and younger LGBT people together. Download Page. PDF Download. This paper is particularly interested in the interaction between age and sexual or gender identity and how these characteristics shape individuals‘ experiences, behaviours and attitudes. Specifically it is concerned with the issues facing older (65+) and younger (under 25) LGBT individuals, the divisions and commonalities between them and whether there is potential to bring the two groups together for mutual benefit... Despite being at different ends of the age spectrum, many older and younger LGBT people will therefore share experiences of marginalisation within society and discrimination by support services. They may also be dealing with some specific mental and physical health concerns, the risks of which may be heightened by their sexual or gender orientation. Traditional mainstream interventions do not appear to offer adequate support to these two groups. Intergenerational approaches could offer an innovative alternative.

Kneale D, Serra V, Bamford S-M, Diener L (2011, International Longevity Centre - UK ). Celebrating Intergenerational Diversity: An evaluation of three projects working withyounger and older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender people. Download Page. PDF Download. All three projects aimed to enable older and younger people to share and learn new skills, improve understanding between younger and older people, foster mutual support and celebrate LGBT heritage. This report describes the project activities; the evaluation process; provides detail on the recruitment and retention methods; outlines the pre-existing need for intergenerational work; illuminates the respective benefits of using different methods to bring older and younger people together; and assesses the success of the projects against the objectives set out at the beginning of the projects. We find that the projects were successful in meeting most of the objectives, and set out summaries of the main benefits of an intergenerational approach used in the projects below.

Bamford S-M, Kneale D, Watson J (2011, International Longevity Centre - UK ). Intergenerational projects for the LGBT community; A toolkit to inspire and inform. Download Page. PDF Download. Anecdotal evidence has always told us that contact between older and younger lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people is overwhelmingly absent. It features rarely in family contexts, which are the primary source of most people’s intergenerational relationships, such as between grandparents and grandchildren. More formally, there are few organised contexts in which older and younger LGB and T people have the opportunity to meet. The consequences can be disquieting, with an absence of any kind of intergenerational support or positive older role models. At Age UK, we have a proud history of promoting intergenerational work and a growing reputation for our equalities work with lesbian, gay, bisexual and, increasingly, transgender people in later life. So we have long felt that bringing the two together in an LGBT intergenerational project was an idea whose time had come... This resource shares the learning of those projects. Fortuitously, it coincides with the publication of Stonewall’s ambitious new research into the needs and aspirations of lesbian, gay and bisexual people in later life, which highlights the much greater likelihood of LGB people ageing alone and without intergenerational contact. We hope therefore it will provide ideas and practical examples, not only to encourage support for older people but also to foster a more positive sense of the future among younger LGB and T members of our communities.

Equality and Human Rights Commission (2011, UK). Close to Home: Inquiry into older people and human rights in home care. Equality and Human Rights Commission. PDF Download.  This has been a collaborative inquiry, significantly enhanced by the commitment of an expert advisory group listed below. Their advice and insights have greatly assisted us... Our thanks go to the many individuals and organisations, such as Anna Gaughan and local Age UK organisations, who helped us to arrange interviews and to reach older people in different communities, and to Wendy Sykes and Carola Groom, whose interviews with older people informed and shaped our inquiry.

Working group of the Irish Association of Social Workers (IASW) and GLEN, the Gay and Lesbian Equality Network (2011). Guide to Good Practice for Social Workers. PDF Download. Older People: In Ireland, older LGB people grew up in a time when homosexuality was pathologised and considered a mental illness and when sexual relationships between samesex couples was considered a criminal act, immoral and sinful. Heterosexuality was seen as the only legitimate sexual orientation and LGB people were marginalised, rendered invisible and socially excluded.93 Indeed, a recent Irish study of older gay people94 documents the stigma, marginalisation and discrimination that older LGB people have faced and the social and emotional impacts this adversity had on their lives and continues to have for some, including:.. Social workers need to be aware of the potential for such fears and concerns among older LGB people and how these can impact on their intervention. It is important to consider that any older person using their service may be LGB or have a same-sex partner. Some older LGB people may withhold disclosure of this information for fear of negative reaction or inadequate standards of care as a result of such disclosure.

Housing Independence Service, Sheffield (2011). Report on the Housing and Support Needs of Older Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual (LGB) People in Sheffield. PDF Download. Purpose of the Report: 1.1 To highlight the consultation undertaken by the Housing Independence Service (HIS) to look at the housing and support needs of older Lesbians, Gay and Bisexual (LGB) people in Sheffield. 1.2 To report on the findings of this work and the associated research. 1.3 To make recommendations about meeting the housing and support needs of older LGB people in Sheffield... Conclusions: 7.1 Although the sample consulted was relatively small, the results of the questionnaire were consistent in showing that the vast majority of people want to live in a bungalow or house when they are older. 7.2 Whilst the actual size of the property does not seem important – unlike in the heterosexual community where older people ask for more space - factors such as been located near to friends and communal facilities does seem important. 7.3 This supports the findings of other research referred to in this report which highlights the importance of been close to peers, especially when the family network may have broken down. 7.4 One area where there is an overwhelming support for one choice is in the kind of housing tenure people want. As in the heterosexual community, the vast majority of people state that when they get older, they want to own their own home.
 
Moriarty J, Mantrope J (2012). Diversity in older people and access to services – an evidence review. A report of research carried out by the Social Care Workforce Research Unit at King’s College London. London, England: Age UK.  PDF DownloadNote: GLBT issues are addressed throughout the document.
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Knocker, Sally (2012). Perspectives on ageing: lesbians, gay men and bisexuals. Joseph Roundtree Foundation. PDF Download. My task for this paper was to seek out and share the views of a wide range of older lesbian, gay and bisexual people on ageing. What is it like to grow old as a lesbian woman? What matters to an older gay man if he needs help and support? What are our fears and hopes about getting older? This paper brings together a range of experiences and views, hopefully to enhance understanding and empathy for this often neglected group. These stories convey the joyful and celebratory aspects of people’s lives as well as their struggles and fears.
 
Stonewall (2011). Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual People in Later Life. PDF Download. Download Page. This report provides a compelling evidence base for the first time about older lesbian, gay and bisexual people in this country. It also provides practical recommendations for a range of agencies about how to improve things. Britain’s 3.7 million gay people contribute £40 billion annually to our public services. It’s only right that as they approach the end of their lives they should be treated with exactly the same care and respect as their heterosexual counterparts... Stonewall commissioned YouGov to survey a sample of 1,050 heterosexual and 1,036 lesbian, gay and bisexual people over the age of 55 across Britain. The survey asked about their experiences and expectations of getting older and examined their personal support structures, family connections and living arrangements. It also asked about how they feel about getting older, the help they expect to need, and what they would like to be available from health and social care services... There are real differences in the personal support structures, family connections and living arrangements of lesbian, gay and bisexual people over 55 compared to their heterosexual peers of the same age. Lesbian, gay and bisexual people are more likely to be single, more likely to live alone, less likely to have children and less likely to be in regular touch with their family.

Hulme, Marcus (2008). Older people: research summary. Big Lottery Fund Research, Issue 42.
PDF Download. Specific groups of older people were seen to have particular needs or to be under-represented in funding streams. These include older people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups; older people with a disability; older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people; those living in a residential home; older prisoners; and people with multiple disadvantages... The researchers identified specific subpopulations of older people that have particular needs or are currently underrepresented in funding streams. These include older people from Black and minority ethnic groups; older people with a disability; older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people; people living in a residential home; older prisoners; and those with multiple disadvantages. 

Heath, Hazel (2011). Older people in care homes: sex, sexuality and intimate relationships: An RCN discussion and guidance document for the nursing workforce. London, England: The Royal College of Nursing. PDF Download. This document was developed by RCN members, staff, and a range of external stakeholders, including older people, as part of the RCN Nursing Older People Strategy. It incorporates advice received from RCN legal advisors, lawyers and officers at the Care Quality Commission (CQC), and the Advisor for Nursing Older People at the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC)... This guidance has been developed to help nurses and care staff work effectively with issues of sexuality, intimate relationships and sex, particularly for older people living in care homes. Its goal is to facilitate learning, support best practice, and serve as a resource to help nurses and care staff address the needs of older service users in a professional, sensitive, legal and practical way.

Heaphy, Brian (2009). The Storied, Complex Liives o Older GLBT Adults: Choice and Its Limits in Older Lesbian and Gay Narratives of Relational Life. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 5: 119–138. PDF Download. This article draws from a British empirical study of older gay men and lesbians that explores intimate, family, and community relationships at mid- and later life. The study included a survey of 266 women and men, qualitative interviews with a subsample of 10 men and 10 women, and eight focus groups (with a total of 16 men and 14 women). The article examines how gay men and lesbians over 50 years old structure and negotiate their relational lives and the factors that limit negotiation. Chosen relationships are important to many participants (Weeks, Heaphy, & Donovan, 2001; Weston, 1991). However, focus-group and interview narratives also highlight the limits of choices with respect to relationships. The article argues the case for a situated understanding of the relational options available to older gay men and lesbians. This involves acknowledging how relational choices and their limits are shaped by access to combined economic, social, and cultural resources.

Enum Y, et al. (2009). Older People’s Mental Health Needs Assessment For Depression, Dementia and Severe Mental Illness (Draft). East London NHS Foundation and NHS Tower Hanlets. PDF Download. PDF Download. Anecdotal evidence suggests that there are a number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans Older People (OLGBT) in Tower Hamlets. There is currently no data but research carried out on behalf of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets recommends that staff are aware of different sexual orientations and that service provision is sensitive to the needs of the service user6. This research recommends a number of actions including looking at current service provision for OLGBT, and developing gay friendly policy and practice.

Charity targets rights for elderly gays (2001): A charity for older people is to address rights issues for elderly lesbian and gay people for the first time. Age Concern is to launch a new publication that aims to raise awareness of the existence and needs of older homosexuals to ensure they enjoy "full and equal access" to services. The resource pack "Opening Doors" is the latest in a series of 24 aimed at various aspects of services for older people. - Frequently Asked Questions (2004): This page aims to provide a brief summary of current information about work Age Concern and other organisations are developing with older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals (OLGBs) and is intended to answer questions frequently asked of Age Concern. - LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions (2003): Government agencies, nonprofit organizations and the media have focused increasing attention on the needs of seniors and those who provide them with support, assistance or care. Less attention has been focused on the needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) older adults and in particular, their caregivers, whether partners, friends or other family members. Many of the issues you or your loved one may confront—such as where to turn for help, what kinds of programs can support caregivers, how to access services—overlap with those faced by heterosexuals. LGBT caregivers and care receivers can also face some specific concerns and particular challenges. - Age Concern’s work with Older Lesbians, Gay Men and Bisexuals (2003): This page aims to provide a brief summary of current information about work Age Concern and other organisations are developing with older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals (OLGBs) and is intended to answer questions frequently asked of Age Concern. - Age Concern launches service for gay and lesbian pensioners (2003): Age Concern has set up a service for gay and lesbian pensioners in the North East of England. The charity says that elderly gay people have often been left isolated without the support that elderly people with other problems have received. In the past there have been horror stories about the treatment of gay men and women in care homes whose sexuality has been uncovered, the say. Now Age Concern is looking to attract lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender men and women in Newcastle and North Shields.

Opening Doors... to the Needs of Older Lesbian, Gay Men and Bisexuals: Report on the One-Day Conference Held in London  on April 2002 (PDF Download) (PDF Download). - Age Concern opens doors to first older lesbian and gay men's conference (2002): Age Concern is to host the first ever national conference to raise awareness about the specific needs of older lesbians and gay men and to call for an end to discrimination. The conference called Opening Doors, will take place on Tuesday 30th April 2002 at the Victoria Park Plaza Hotel, London SW1. It follows the publication of the charity's resource pack, 'Opening Doors – Working with older lesbians and gay men,' published last July. Older lesbians and gay men can be subjected to double discrimination. Like older heterosexual people they may have to deal with the problem of age discrimination but on top of that older lesbians and gay men often have to face negative attitudes and social injustices because of their sexuality.  - Opening doors for the 'grey and gay' (2003): A conference looking at ways of tackling discrimination against older lesbians and gays is to be held in Berkshire.

Opening Doors: Working With Older Lesbians and Gay Men - 2001 - (London: Age Concern England): What these facts mean for transgender persons is that the option of being completely “stealth” shrinks as one ages. Although some post-operative MTFs look completely female even unclothed, that is not the case for FTMs, MTFs who could not afford or didn’t want genital surgery, crossdressers, and other transgender and intersex individuals whose secondary sex characteristics and/or genitals don’t “match” their dressed appearance. The fact that, unlike their non-transgender lesbian and gay male peers, most trans elders can NOT be closeted in health care settings, makes it even more imperative that efforts to educate aging and health services personnel and institutions about sexual orientation and gender identity diversity include detailed information about trans elders. Unfortunately, that transgender inclusion is in name only far too often. A good example of this “disappearing T” phenomena is a resource packet for aging services providers on LGBT issues created by Age Concern England, “Opening Doors: Working with Older Lesbians and Gay Men.” Despite its title, the Introduction states that the packet uses the term “lesbian and gay older people to encapsulate lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older people.” (p. 2, emphasis added) Unfortunately, that is the only time transgender people are mentioned.

Housing The Elderly Gay (2001): Old gay people should have the right to their own separate care homes and sheltered apartments, according to charity Age Concern. It is the first time that a charity for elderly people has actually addressed this rights issue for elderly gay and lesbians. Age Concern believes that one in every 15 of the people who use its’ services are gay. Age Concern believes that elderly gay people who have to share residential care homes with heterosexuals go through “the very real fear of suffering and discrimination”. There is no gay care housing in the UK. Gay sheltered apartments, however, do exist in Holland. The situation for most lesbian and gay people at the beginning of the 21st century is more positive, secure and affirming that at any time in our history,” Age Concern England's director general, Gordon Lishman told the BBC.  - Fife Men Project: "Statistics indicate that many people who do use public sex environments are married men, or older gay men."  - Gay community housing fears (2001, London): Gay men and lesbians living in the North East fear getting older and having to move to sheltered accommodation where their sexuality may not be readily accepted - according to new research carried out by a national housing provider. The survey questioned 168 gay men and lesbians in the Newcastle area on their current housing situation and how they would like their future housing needs to be met. The research was commissioned by North British Housing Association (NBHA), which currently provides 5,200 properties for rent in the North East.  NBHA's Equality Advisor, Chris Root, says: “We wanted to assess the housing needs of older gay men and lesbians. As part of our commitment to equality and diversity we chose to use a sample in the North East because it has one of the longest standing gay communities together with a higher than average unemployment level which means that there is a greater need for affordable housing.” “The findings show that over half of those questioned feel that housing is a problem for older gay people. Like many older people, they want to feel safe and secure should they become ill or disabled and require care. Many do not like the idea of moving into sheltered accommodation that is predominantly heterosexual or where their sexuality would not be easily understood. But they also do not want to live in accommodation that is exclusive to gay people. Two thirds of those questioned would prefer to live in a mixed housing scheme with people who are 'gay friendly'.”

Elderly gay community gains support (2006): A new resource pack has been launched to help those working in care homes and extra-care housing support older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals... The publication is part of Age Concern’s Opening Doors programme of publications, resources and events for and about older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals [The whole of me. Meeting the needs of older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals living in care homes and extra care housing: PDF Download]. - UK charity publishes guidance for care of elderly gays (2012): Stonewall provides advice and recommendations for public bodies on meeting the needs of elderly lesbian, gay and bisexual people.  - Elderly facing homophobic abuse in care homes (BBC Video, 2012). - Alzheimer's Society (2013). Factsheet: Moving into a care home – advice for lesbian, gay and bisexual people. PDF Download. Making the decision to move into a care home is never easy, for the person with dementia, their partner or relatives – whatever the person’s sexual orientation. However, in spite of recent improvements in law to protect their rights, lesbian, gay and bisexual people can still find moving into a care home particularly difficult due to fears of homophobia or of not having their specific needs met. This factsheet provides some advice on choosing a suitable care home and suggests things to think about when the person moves in.

Kitchen, Gary (2003). Social Care Needs Of Older Gay Men and Lesbians On Merseyside (Word 97 Download): This research was commissioned by Sefton Pensioners Advocacy Centre (SPAC) and Merseyside Gay and Lesbian Community Forum.  The research aims to identify the social care needs of older gay men and lesbians on Merseyside.   In particular, it seeks to find out whether existing generic provision is flexible enough to meet those needs... 1.18    What is required now is more evidence.  It is hoped that this limited study can make a contribution to this work.  We will need to explore the background policy context of health and social care developments for gay and lesbian older people (Section 2); look at evidence about commissioning processes for social care on Merseyside (Section 3); consider evidence from older gay men and lesbians on Merseyside (Sections 4 and 5); then make some recommendations for future practice (Section 6)... At present it is simply not clear whether generic services are able to meet the social care needs of older gay men and lesbians, but the evidence shows these needs have not been properly acknowledged or taken on board so far.  This makes it doubtful whether those needs are being properly met, and they are most certainly not being monitored. Though the present generation of older gay men and lesbians may appear reluctant to make demands on services, service providers from all sectors – statutory, voluntary and private – need to bear in mind that both the demographic increase in the older gay and lesbian population and the emergence of a more vocal generation of gay people will mean that sooner rather than later they will need to get to grips with the needs of older gay men and lesbians.  Long term planning across all sectors hence needs to address this issue. But there is much that can be done now to meet the needs of the current generation of older gay men and lesbians, who cannot afford to wait.  Their relative silence should not be an excuse for inaction.   The recommendations that follow are hence aimed at making a difference to those who are in need of support today as well as preparing the ground for the future.

LGBT Centre for Health & Wellbeing (2005). Shaping Futures: LGBT People Growing Older. Report from a seminar of 11th May 2004. PDF Download. PDF Download. Heaphy B, et al. (2005). Non-heterosexual Ageing: social and policy implications: This brief report presents selective findings from a project that explored the issue of ageing in a nonheterosexual context, and the implications for social policy. We studied the life circumstances of lesbians, gay men and bisexuals aged between the fifties and eighties, asking about what they thought about how they would age or what had happened as they aged... Barker L, Age Concern England (2005). Older Lesbians, Gay Men and Bisexuals Opening Doors to Health: Lessons from research for service providers and voluntary organisations... Valentine, James (2005). Creating Collaboration, Visibility and Integration... LGBT People Growing Older report from workshop sessions.

Gay & Grey in Dorset (2006). Lifting the Lid on Sexuality and Ageing: A research project into the needs, wants, fears and aspirations of older lesbians and gay men. Published by Help and Care Development Ltd. PDF DownloadA total of 300 self-completion questionnaires were distributed using existing lesbian and gay male groups and networks. A response rate of 30% (90) was achieved with an age range of 50 – 90 years. 34% (31) of respondents were subsequently interviewed. The volunteers undertook the statistical analysis of the data from the questionnaires and the thematic analysis of open-ended questions. They also carried out the interviews and analysed the information gathered. The gender mix of respondents was almost equal; we were unsuccessful in reaching other than white ethnic cultures. 44% of respondents were professional; more than 50% had access to the Internet... Conclusions: It is has become evident throughout our research that everyone experiences their sexuality in very different ways. However there are some strong themes to draw on whilst highlighting a need for radical change in our society, if lesbians and gay men are to feel totally at ease with themselves. The main theme running through the whole research is for a need to have homosexual identities validated and accepted by society...

ILC-UK seminar: Housing, health and social care issues affecting older lesbian, gay and bisexual people (2008): It is estimated that older LGB people comprise approximately 5-7% of the population of older people in the UK. However, this group of older people is largely 'invisible'. It is generally accepted that similar to older people in general, older LGB people can be faced with issues such as ageism, social isolation, poor health and income poverty. However, previous and continued experiences of stigma and discrimination, because of their sexuality, often make the experience of growing older for LGB people one that is different from that of their heterosexual peers. This event explored: How does the experience of aging for LGB people differ from those of their heterosexual peers?  What are the distinct needs of older LGB people and how can they be met?  How can service providers ensure older LGB can access services without fear of discrimination?  Equality law and older LGB people (Jonathan Finney, 2008), Difference matters: sexuality, ageing and later life (Brian Heaphy, 2008), Housing issues faced by older lesbians, gay men, bisexual and transgender people (Bob Green. 2008), Polari’s recent research and consultations (Lindsay River,2008), Back in the closet - the care system and older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals (Steve Pugh, 2008).

My Kind of Day (2001): David and Stuart live together in a stable gay relationship, but there is a measure of instability in their day-to-day lives. David was diagnosed with Lewy Body Disease (LBD) four years ago. They live in Scotland.. But it is not so much that his partner may one day be bed-ridden that frightens Stuart. He feels up to coping with that. It is David’s failing cognitive faculties and the onset of dementia which are the hardest to bear. David has hallucinations, delusions and wild mood swings. On his “good” days he can hold an intelligent conversation and carry out his share of everyday domestic tasks. But despite medication to control the physical and mental symptoms of this little-understood and ultimately fatal disease, Stuart can never predict when David will have a “bad” day. David is 48 and Stuart is 53. (These are not their real names and some personal details have been changed. Stuart requested anonymity because David insists that no-one must know his mental faculties are degenerating. He told us that when David finds copies of Signpost or any other publication to do with mental health, he destroys them.) ... Being a gay couple has caused no problems with anyone in the medical profession we’ve encountered recently. I’m thankful for that, because years ago, before David came into my life, I did have a homophobic GP whose practice I soon left. Also, I was once barrier-nursed and treated like a proverbial leper in a hospital while having minor surgery simply because I’d listed my gay partner as my next of kin on the admission and operation consent forms. I knew I was HIV-negative, but the doctors and nurses only began to treat me like a human being again once I’d consented to an HIV test and the result was negative. I was livid that there was an assumption that all homosexual people presented a public health risk. But not being a legal entity as far as the Benefits Agency, our local authority, and other public bodies are concerned has created difficulties. To them, we are two single men. On a number of occasions I have had to seek advice from the Carers National Association, our local Carers Association, and an organisation called Crossroads which offers advice to carers of people with mental difficulties. At one and the same time I am David’s lover, partner, housemate, landlord, registered carer and Motability chauffeur! For the past 18 months I have been battling with our local authority to obtain Council Tax Benefit because of our low income. Even letters from our MP have failed to convince it of our entitlement. And I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry when I received a letter one April from the Invalid Care Allowance Unit saying that it would cease paying me unless I could comply with an impossible demand to produce within two weeks audited accounts to the end of May that same year! The muddle and inefficiency of publicly accountable departments causes me no end of aggravation, endless form-filling, letter-writing and ‘phone calls. But even that is not so stressful as the uncertainty of what state of mind David will be in day by day. We read a lot about the rights of women, children, the elderly, the disabled, single parents, ethnic minorities, asylum seekers and other disadvantaged groups. I am a supporter of all those. Every so often, campaigners draw our attention to the rights of homosexuals and I avidly support them. But the fact is that, in most aspects of citizenry, the law does not recognise two people of the same sex, who co-habit (and who may have been together monogamously for even longer than their heterosexual parents!) as a couple. 

Older and wiser (2000, Health and Community, UK, 2001, New Site for Shout Magazine, but only to 2005): Being gay or bisexual isn't always easy. Being a gay or bisexual man and getting older brings its own difficulties. As well as coping with homophobia and heterosexism, there is also ageism from other gay men. Readers of the gay paper Boyz will have read one recent contributor's comments, stating that he didn't want to see disabled or 'old' men on the scene. His message was clear; the scene is for pretty young things with flawless skin and gym-toned bodies. Anyone who doesn't meet these standards should stay at home... Thankfully, this garbage was quickly challenged by many other readers and the paper's editor, who each declared their own right to enjoy all that the scene has to offer (all right, this was mainly in London, not rural North Yorkshire) and their preference for more mature men. However this was no lone voice, all too often older gay men don't access the scene because they have been made to feel unwelcome, or fear that  they will be treated as a curiosity, accepted as a novelty or a 'character'. There are more serious issues facing older gay men, and in time these will affect most of us."

Summer 2004 saw the appointment of our first National Development and Policy Officer with a specific brief to develop work with and for older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals. At the same time, a growing number of local and regional Age Concern initiatives for older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals have been developing around the country.

Alzheimer's Society Helpline: Support for Lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) people with dementia, and their carers, partners, friends and relatives. They face many challenges - not only the challenges that people who are not in same sex relationships experience, but possibly many more.

Berkshire Older Lesbian and Gay Forum. - Gray Gay Guide.  - GEMS: Gay Elderly Men's Society. - OLGA: Older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Trans Association. - Gay2December: The UK dating site dedicated to younger older gay relationships. v- Age of Diversity, For older LGBT people throughout the UK: Resource Links.- Older UK Lesbians: This is group is for Lesbians over 40 and their admirers. Chat, connect, swap ideas and enjoy. - Pink Cupid: Mature Lesbian Dating in UK.

Age UK Camden: The Opening Doors London project: provides a range of services and activities for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) people over 50 in London. - Silver Rainbow: For older lesbians and gay men in Croydon. - Older people: Info, Groups and Services.
- Older gay and Lesbian Groups.- The Lesbian & Gay Foundation: LGBT Carers Forum.

Older Lesbians’ and Gay Men’s Forum Brighton and Hove (2002 to 2005). - The Metro Project: 50+ Group is for older Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual People (2003 to 2004). - Opening Doors in Gloucestershire (2003 to 2005). - Stradivarius (2001 to 2007).


To "The SEARCH Section" For The Best Search Engines & Information Directories, The Searchable Sites to Locate Papers & Abstracts... and The Sites - Some Searchable - Where "Free Papers" Are Available! 

Australia

Growing Old Disgracefully: Calls for Gay-Friendly Retirement Home (2008): For many people, growing old is a difficult process. But a forum in Sydney last night heard it is particularly hard for members of the gay and lesbian community. The AIDS Council of New South Wales says older gays and lesbians are probably the most invisible and least cared for of all senior groups, suffering discrimination on many fronts. High Court judge Justice Michael Kirby told the forum that churches need to be more accepting of the gay and lesbian community and must make church-run retirement homes more gay-friendly. - Back into the closet: gays find few friends in aged care (2010): An Adelaide gerontologist, Jo Harrison, said the aged-care situation for the gay community - with lack of services, awareness and funding - was at crisis point, and problems facing gay seniors had not been acknowledged in government policy. ''People want to commit suicide rather than use aged-care services,'' Dr Harrison said. ''What the hell is going on? We need to fix it.'' The gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender health organisation ACON estimates NSW has more than 35,000 gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex people over 55. ''Gay and lesbian people do have specific needs as they age, and we're seeing a large and significant population of older people in our community missing out on services and being discriminated,'' ACON's chief executive, Nicolas Parkhill, said.

Gay and Lesbian Ageing Issues in Australia: Jo Harrison's Web Page.
- For the Aunt I Never Met (2001): "With regard to aged care for our GLBT community, not a lot has changed since Edith died. In an article in the Advertiser a few weeks age, Jo Harrison, a Ph.D. student in Lesbian gerontology at the University of South Australia, was interviewed on the invisibilisation of older gay men and lesbians. Some of these people, she says "hide their lives in the back of a drawer, putting away photos of their deceased partners and passing as never having had a partner or as having been heterosexual.In response to this article, I decided to do a little research of my own, and so spent several hours phoning local aged care facilities to get some idea of nursing staff awareness of the issue." ..."We don’t think it appropriate to ask about the sexuality of our residents, because we don’t believe that homosexuals have any special needs." ...In most of the interviews, I raised the question of how easy it is for applicants ornew residents to make known their sexual orientation, and in all cases, I was told that there is no provision on any form, or in any interview process... I spoke also with a student currently writing an honours thesis on gay men and aging, who claims that government policy is responsible not for the prevailing lack of awareness, but also for legislation which actively discriminated against us.

Harrison, Jo (2010). Submission to: National Safety and Quality Framework in Australian Health. PDF Download. Doctoral research which I conducted [in 2004] investigated the lack of recognition of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex issues in all areas of gerontology, including government policy and quality assurance, in Australia and the USA. The research revealed a serious lack of attention to concerns related to sexuality and gender identity in the Australian context...  The deficit in Australian gerontology is reflected in a complete lack of mention of GLBTI elderly people in aged care policy, education and training, research priorities, program guidelines and consumer related initiatives. This absence of mention of or attention to the special needs of GLBTI elders and their carers and advocates reinforces invisibility and avoids the need to address whether standards of care, or processes for assessing compliance and quality improvement, are culturally appropriate to GLBTI needs...This lack of attention runs counter to the rapidly increasing recognition of GLBTI aged care concerns across Australian gerontology and the gay and lesbian community, including representative organisations... There is a growing body of evidence regarding the extent to which GLBTI elders are experiencing discrimination, or fear of discrimination, within an industry which remains unaware and uneducated as to their special needs and unique concerns. This is evidenced in reports from a four stage Foundation funded GLBTI aged care project conducted by the Matrix Guild Victoria, investigating discrimination and abuse on the basis of sexuality or gender identity. The reports My People and Permission to Speak are available online at http://www.matrixguildvic.org.au/project.html N/A.
 
Discrimination and older gays: surviving aged care (2004): Older gays and lesbians face a discriminatory environment when it comes to ageing and aged care services, according to gerontology researcher Dr Jo Harrison of the University of South Australia. Dr Harrison says that the view of ageing as a negative, lonely experience is a serious barrier to overcoming discrimination on the basis of age in the gay and lesbian community. Connection to the gay community can contribute to a positive ageing experience, and many gay and lesbian people fear having to go to a nursing home in old age. According to Harrison, aged care services operate within a dominant “heteronormative” framework in which heterosexual experience is seen as the central world view and the role of sexuality as a component of identity is not recognised. Harrison says that heteronormative assumptions underpin many discussions of aged care practice, particularly when referring to relationships, family, household, taxation and superannuation. Terms like “never married”, “spouse carer” and “widowed” reflect the assumption that all elderly people are heterosexual. This can lead to a situation where an older gay man or lesbian is reluctant to disclose their sexuality and it is therefore unlikely that their needs will be met to the fullest extent possible.

Living Longer. Living Better (2012): National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) Ageing and Aged Care Strategy. The Minister for Mental Health and Ageing, the Hon Mark Butler MP, launched the National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) Ageing and Aged Care Strategy (the Strategy) on 20 December 2012. As part of the Older Australians from Diverse Backgrounds stream of the Living Longer Living Better aged care reform package, the Government announced consultation with groups representing people from diverse backgrounds to assess the requirement for the development of further tools and/or strategies to support their needs in aged care. Some older Australians with diverse needs find it difficult to access aged care information and services that are sensitive to their backgrounds and circumstances. The Government is committed to ensuring people from diverse backgrounds can access aged care services that are specific to their care needs. The Strategy will help inform the way Government responds to the needs of older LGBTI people and better support the aged care sector to deliver care that is sensitive and appropriate. - Living Longer. Living Better. National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) Ageing and Aged Care Strategy (2012): PDF Download.

How prepared is the retirement and residential aged care sector in Western Australia for older non-heterosexual people? (2012): Postal surveys were sent to 329 providers of accommodation to ask about their attitudes, knowledge and current practices towards older GLBTI people. Two focus groups were also held with managers of accommodation facilities and GLBTI community members... Few respondents reported having experience with any older GLBTI residents in their retirement or residential aged care facility. There was poor inclusion of GLBTI issues in policy frameworks, and limited understanding regarding same-sex law reforms... Older non-heterosexual people are often obscured within ageing population discourses, and conceal their identity for fear of discrimination. GLBTI-sensitive practices can help to facilitate the disclosure of sexual orientation and/or gender identity that may assist in meeting the unique needs of this group.

Zirngast, Natalie (2002). Aged Care in Australia for Gay, Lesbian Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex people. RMIT Student Union Briefing paper. PDF Download. Despite the impression one might get from the publicity surrounding the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras, the situation for older gays and lesbians within the field of ageing research and service development does not warrant much celebration in the land Ôdown underÕ. Australian gerontology is a long way from fully recognising gay and lesbian ageing issues. Apart from a few exceptions, current Australian research, education policy and service development rarely, if ever, addresses non-heterosexual experience or issues. Heterosexist assumptions are embedded in Australian gerontological literature and research reports. Discussions of sexuality and ageing inevitably focus on stereotypical notions of "asexual" heterosexual elderly people, and responses to such stereotypes.
 
ALSO’s queer aged care plan (2003): " THE ALSO Foundation will develop an older person’s home-based care pilot project to meet the needs of frail aged gay, lesbian and transgender people wanting to live at home." - When I'm 64 N/A: A new community initiative will address the needs of GLBT seniors.

Working Paper: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (GLBTI) Ageing and Discrimination Forum (2009, Word Download): The Anti-Discrimination Board’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Consultation and the Sex and Gender Diversity Consultation identified as a growing concern the issue of ageing and discrimination for people in the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex communities. These consultations are held quarterly at the Board to examine current issues of discrimination, harassment or vilification, case law and to promote awareness amongst communities of these current issues. As a part of raising awareness within the communities the ADB published an article in Equal Time [Number 61, August 2004] by Dr Harrison on Discrimination and Older Gays: Surviving Aged Care. This article highlighted the fact that although only a small percentage of the aged population ever require nursing home care, but the fear of being “forced back into the closet” makes many GLBTI people reluctant to consider this as an option, and may influence their overall thinking about ageing. A case was cited where a lesbian being admitted to a nursing home felt unable to reveal that the ‘friend’ accompanying her at admission was really her life partner. The partner was therefore not given the same visiting and decision-making rights as the woman’s children. As a further Anti-Discrimination Board initiative the Ageing and Discrimination Forum was held to assist people from GLBTI communities have input regarding issues surrounding ageing and aged care. It also served to raise awareness of ageing issues and of the intersection between age and discrimination.

Australian Study Looks At Older Gays (1999): "Older gay men and lesbians living in retirement homes still experience widespread prejudice, intolerance and fear... When we outlined in our prospectus the range of facilities we planned to develop for the gay and lesbian community, the strongest response was to our plans for gay- and lesbian-specific aged cared homes and retirement villages." - Vintage Men Incorporated (The Melbourne Chapter of Prime Timers World Wide): The Social and Support Group for Mature Gay and Bisexual Men and their Friends. 

From OlderDykes.org (Australia): - Newsletters: 2008 to 2013+. - Listing of Articles (To 2008). - Archives (To 2007). - Hey! Look at Me, I'm Grieving! (2002) "There are books on practically every aspect of grief except those experienced by women grieving for women. Women whose partners have died. When this happened to me I searched for something - anything - what to do, what not to do, how to cope under the weight of this sledge hammer that had flattened me to pulp. I found nothing." - Thousands of Elderly Lesbians in Poverty (Alternate Link): "To conclude, there are lesbians who will experience the delights of a well funded retirement, but more than half of our lesbian population will experience some degree of poverty."

Towards the Recognition of GLBTI Ageing in Australian Gerontology (2006): "Issues concerning gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex (GLBTI) older people have been almost completely neglected in Australian gerontology. This is reflected in textual discourse, clinical and service practices, training and education, research approaches and policy development..."

The 2006 Australian Association of Gerontology Conference: "Diversity in Aging": Press release: PDF Download. With large numbers of openly gay and lesbian people entering old age for the first time, the Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG) is using their National Conference to highlight the discrimination and emerging health issues being faced by this once invisible group. “While government continues to recognise the diversity of our ageing population when implementing healthy ageing policies, its very rare that the obstacles faced by gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender (GLBT) people are acknowledged,” said Prof Tony Broe, President of the Australian Association of Gerontology. - Aged but not forgotten (Sidney Star Observer): PDF Download. - Aging Gays on Agenda (Sidney Star Observer): PDF Download. Aging in the gay and lesbian community was a hot topic at two national aging conferences in Sydney this week. The Emerging Researchers in Aging conference on Tuesday featured a segment on the particular issues faced by gay men aged 60 and up. These included not having a say in the medical treatment of their partners and medical staff not being sensitive to gay issues. The Australian Association of Gerontology conference, titled Diversity in Aging and held from Wednesday to Friday, was looking at issues including living with HIV/AIDS in aged care facilities, identity needs and the fear of disclosing sexuality.

GRAI: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Retirement Association Incorporated. - We don’t have any of those people here – research papers: We don't have any of those people here (2010): PDF Download. - Best Practice Guidelines (2010): PDF Download. - Literature Review: PDF Download.

Hughes M (2007). Older lesbians and gays accessing health and aged-care services. Australian Social Work, 60(2): 197-209. PDF Download.  This paper examines older lesbian and gay people’s experiences of and expectations for the delivery of health and aged care services. In-depth narrative interviews were conducted with older gays and lesbians in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney. Data were analysed by identifying evaluative statements within specific narratives and grouping these statements into themes. Participants reflected on the meaning of their sexual identity and how they would like it to be acknowledged when in contact with health and aged care service providers. In addition to direct discrimination, participants reported a more indirect form of discrimination in providers’ assumption of heterosexuality among clients and their failure to provide lesbian- or gay-friendly services. The findings highlight the need for health and aged care services to better understand and acknowledge older gay and lesbian people’s sexual identities to enable improved access to services in the future.

Harrison Jo (2005). Pink, lavender and grey: Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex ageing in Australian gerontology. Gay and Lesbian Issues and Psychology Review, 1(1): 11-16. PDF Download.Issues concerning sexual and gender identity have been almost completely neglected in Australian research and action around ageing. This is reflected in textual discourse, clinical and service practices, training and education, research approaches and policy development. The present research investigated whether lessons might be drawn from the experience of activists in the United States of America (USA) and then applied to Australian gerontology with regard to the recognition of GLBTI ageing. The research aimed to provide guideposts for a process of change in Australia, by the investigation of the factors involved in collective action. Qualitative research was conducted in Australia and the State of California in the USA. The research findings revealed: a previously under-recognised personal dimension of action; the importance of self-determinist approaches in the USA; and the status of the Australian situation. The findings raise important implications for those who conduct research and undertake clinical or service related practice in aged care, as well as for the Australian GLBTI community.

Inquiry into Caring for Older Australians: 2010 Submission by Dr Jo Harrison, Fellow of the Aust. Assoc. Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia (PDF Download): This submission strongly recommends: That the Federal government formally recognise GLBTI older people as a special needs group for the purposes of aged care in Australia. This recognition needs to be at an equivalent level to that currently afforded to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse populations. In the context of such formal recognition as a special needs group, the Federal government also needs to develop a National GLBTI Aged Care Plan, which would provide targeted resources to address GLBTI needs across the aged care sector, including research, education, advocacy, direct care programs and policy development. Such a national plan could be administered by the Department of Health and Ageing... 

Harrison J, Irlam CB (2010). The removal of same-sex discrimination: Implications for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender & intersex (LGBTI) aged care. Discussion Paper. Australian Coalition for Equality and Diversity Futures, Adelaide. The paper is also available online: PDF Download N/A. PDF Download. Full Text. Key issues during ACAT assessment: Invisibility  Baby Boomers (Loud and proud) vs. Generation Silent (Closeted).  Does identification of relationship led to ACAT assessor altering approach towards consumer. - Family, friends & partners   How is partner / companion / other significant nominated person included in decision process. Are biological children/relatives views listened to more favourably than consumers “companion.” - Culturally safe & inclusive environment  What steps are taken to make LGBTI consumer and their partner/companion feel included and safe?  - Culturally appropriate LGBTI language  Is the language used on forms and in conversation appropriate for LGBTI people?  Do they recognise how their circumstances “fit in” to the form language? -- Conclusion: It is not necessary to recognise or be aware of a person’s LGBTI status in order to respect their cultural heritage.  As the first introduction to the aged care sector for many LGBTI people, there is a responsibility on all ACAT members to provide the most positive experience possible.  Further reading – “Dementia: Lesbians and Gay Men” Alzheimer's Australia Discussion Paper No 15, 2009.

Kushner, Bernard Dean (2012). The life and ageing experiences of gay men over the age of 65 in New Zealand. Master's Dissertation, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand. Download Page. Data were gathered from semi-structured interviews with 12 men from the ages of 65-81 years of age. Analysis of the data were completed by thematic analysis... Resilience was a significant factor in how well the men aged even in an environment of homophobia. Being independent and having a strong social support network were factors that assisted them in ageing in the absence of a partner. Other ageing concerns that surfaced that were not sexual orientation specific were dealing with loss, death, financial well-being, and the ageist attitudes of others. The men were wary of sharing their sexual orientation with too many healthcare professionals and they feared having to potentially hide their sexual orientation again if they ever needed to go into a long-term care setting in the future. This study highlights the unique experiences of ageing among older gay men in New Zealand. Healthcare professionals as well as nurse educators and researchers must recognise the unique history of this group of men and any conflicts this group may have with others of different orientation in order to assist them to age well in a safe social environment.

Dr Jo Harrison, School of Health Sciences. University of South Australia - Submission to The 2009-2010 Senate Community Affairs References Committee Inquiry into Suicide in Australia (Download Page) (The Report, June 2010: The Hidden Toll: Suicide in Australia - PDF, Download Page and HTML Version)  (2009, PDF N/A): Doctoral research which I conducted investigated the lack of recognition of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex (GLBTI) issues in all areas of gerontology and aged care, including government policy and quality assurance, in Australia and the USA. The research revealed a serious lack of attention to concerns related to sexuality and gender identity in the Australian context. In the US context, a history of recognition of GLBTI concerns at all levels of aged care was apparent. The thesis is available online at http://arrow.unisa.edu.au:8081/1959.8/24955. The deficit in Australian gerontology is reflected in a complete lack of mention of GLBTI elderly people in aged care policy, education and training, research priorities, program guidelines and consumer related initiatives. This absence of mention of or attention to the special needs of GLBTI elders and their carers and advocates reinforces invisibility, which in turn reinforces discrimination by neglect and exacerbates anxiety, depression and thoughts of self-harm as well as attempted suicide (Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, 2007(a)(b))... Consequently, many older GLBT Australians may not identify with the GLBT community, resulting in severe social isolation and stigma that significantly increases risk of suicide and self-harm. Older GLBT people have themselves referred to the impact of ageing amidst a youth-oriented gay cultural milieu, which harms self-esteem through the promotion of negative ageist stereotypes (Harrison, 2005). There is an urgent need to resource further research and service development to better understand and respond to issues connected to suicide and older GLBT people... A recent survey of a group of older gay men in Sydney with the highest attendance rate of any community group in that city revealed that one third of the members of the group had considered suicide. Such data requires urgent further analysis and the immediate generation of additional research investigating the causative factors behind this statistic. Such research could also investigate from the perspective of older gay men themselves what interventions and strategies could assist them amidst such serious thoughts of self-harm (Ostrow, 2009). As a researcher with experience in service provision I am approached frequently by others in gerontology and the GLBTI community about issues connected to depression and self-harm. Often this approach relates to a specific incident which has occurred and the source of the information is seeking advice. Such experiential incidents have included: • A manager of a residential aged care facility who was himself gay but not out to his staff reported that a resident had committed suicide and the manager was certain that depression related to sexual identity and isolation were causative factors. The manager decided to come out to his staff and initiate awareness training so that such an incident never recurred.  • An elderly gay man caring for a partner with cancer was advised to attend a carers’ support group to seek some support at a time of great distress. He was subjected to ostracism and abuse by members of the group, run by a mainstream church in his local area, once he revealed that he was caring for a same sex partner. He subsequently became seriously suicidal and attempted to contact Beyond Blue but only found a recorded message. He relied on personal contacts overnight for support and eventually rang Lifeline (Pollard, 2009) http://www.starobserver.com.au/soapbox/ 2009/10/20/a-cancer-of-the-soul/17406 - • A lesbian in her 60s reported that she had clarified with her family that she intended to commit suicide rather than become a consumer of any aged care services, because, she reported, they were homophobic and could not be trusted. She had completed documentation and discussed her decision with her partner and son (Harrison, 2004).  • A social worker reported that a gay man in his 70s was being deliberately moved from a residential to a psychiatric facility because he was ‘entertaining male visitors’. He became depressed and at risk of self-harm.  • A gay man in his 60s was a client of a day centre and became open about his sexual identity. The Director of the centre announced to the Occupational Therapist that he would have to wear latex gloves at all times or leave the centre, due to ‘risk of HIV infection’. He became depressed and suicidal while the issue was negotiated and a resolution reached (Harrison, 2001). Beyond Blue has produced a booklet Older People and Depression which addresses the matter of depression in people over 80 years of age. No mention of GLBTI people is made in this booklet, despite particular reference to culturally diverse groups with special needs.

National LGBTI Health Alliance: Ageing and Issues Facing Older LGBTI Australians: National LGBTI Ageing and Aged Care Strategy (2012, Australian Government: Department of Health and Aging). - Equality for LGBTI Australians in Aged Care (2012): “We will work with the National LGBTI Health Alliance to develop a comprehensive strategy to make sure the needs of LGBTI Australians are addressed in the implementation of our $3.7 billion aged care reform package,” Mr Butler said. Mr Butler said the strategy builds on the support already announced Living Longer Living Better package already provides support for LGBTI Australians. “In April, I announced $2.5 million to support staff training that is sensitive to the specific needs of these older Australians,” Mr Butler said. “This funding supports aged care providers to work with their staff to continually improve how they respond to the diverse and complex needs of the older Australians they support.“The National LGBTI Aged Care Strategy will provide direction for providers and better articulate and coordinate our aims.

Department of Health, Victorian Government (2011). Well for Life: Improving emotional wellbeing for older people In residential aged care. Melbourne, Victoria: Wellbeing, Integrated Care and Ageing Division, Victorian Government, Department of Health. PDF Download. Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex people It is important that aged care service providers support the sexuality of clients, whether they are heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender or intersex. Many older people grew up in an era when homosexuality, other non-mainstream sexualities and transgender identities may have been considered criminal, unnatural, deviant or the basis for societal discrimination. This can mean that older people might not feel comfortable or safe to ‘come out’, or talk about their needs. This may have a range of impacts from limited expression of their sexuality or gender identity to social isolation that, in turn, can have negative consequences on emotional wellbeing. Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex (GLBTI) older people want understanding, empathy, non judgement, acceptance, sensitivity and awareness. Cultural competency training, advocacy and respect by service providers are important in providing safe, high-quality services appropriate to their needs.

Brian and Norm - a love story (YouTube, 2010, Part 1, Part 2). - ABC Radio National’s 360 Documentary: Brian and Norm - a love story (2010, Video): Putting someone you love into a nursing home is heartbreaking for anyone but imagine visiting the person you've shared most of your life with and not being able to show them any affection. When Brian put his partner of over fifty years into a Catholic nursing home he knew it was the best option – his partner was originally from Italy and had a strong Catholic heritage – but fear of anti-gay prejudice has kept him from showing the natural affection of a life spent together. This is a story of the everyday things that bring two lives together, and the terrible loneliness once they have been separated. Since this program was made Norm died, peacefully in Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and then Brian also passed away three months later.


 

Canada

La situation et les alternatives pour les aînés gais et lesbiennes francophone de l’Ontario : Vieillir LGBT, un retour au placard? (2010, Translation). Tough to be gay and aging (2006, Alternate Link): A doctor expressed disgust after discovering his elderly patient was gay. - Gay and lesbian seniors face health quandary: study (2006):  Gay and lesbian seniors are a hidden population in Canada facing huge obstacles in accessing proper health care and social services, a new study from McGill University has found. The McGill School of Social Work conducted the study on the treatment of gay and lesbian seniors by health care providers and others between 2003 and January of this year. The report, released Tuesday, was based on 90 interviews with seniors, their caregivers and their health care workers in three urban centres -- Vancouver, Montreal and Halifax. What it found was somewhat shocking. - Ageing Well, Ageism and Gay Men (2006, Canadian AIDS Society). - Gay, lesbian seniors face health-care hurdles, study says (2006): Lesbian and gay seniors in Canada are at risk in the health-care system because of marginalization and discrimination, says a study released Tuesday. Many homosexual seniors are reluctant to voice their concerns, file complaints or even reveal their names, according to the four-year study led by researchers at McGill University in Montreal. "What results is a lack of recognition of gay and lesbian seniors and their caregivers, and a system that is unprepared to address their unique needs and realities," the study's authors say in their report, The Health and Social Service Needs of Gay and Lesbian Seniors and Their Families. The report notes the situation is particularly difficult for homosexual people who are 60 or older because they have lived many – if not all – of their years dealing with hostility and discrimination.

Quebec unveils guide to care of gay elderly people (2011). - Discrimination Threatens Elderly Gay Men's Health Care (2003, Alternate Link): Discrimination in many social and institutional environments poses an important threat to the health and well-being of gay and lesbian seniors and their families. This problem exists despite changes in attitude in recent years towards gays and lesbians, according to a recent study. A study published in the April 2003 issue of The Gerontologist found that older gay men and lesbians often mistrust the health and social service networks as a result of life-long experiences of marginalization and oppression. "Many gay and lesbian elders who experienced the pervasive social stigma that existed prior to the advent of gay liberation movement maintain a sense of extreme caution with respect to whether or not societal attitudes have really changed," according to the authors of the study, Shari Brotman, Bill Ryan and Robert Cormier of the McGill School of Social Work... Although several issues arose from the four focus group discussions, the authors found that "the one theme that emerged repeatedly and most frequently was the profound marginalization experienced by older gays and lesbians in all aspects of social and political life." Gay and lesbian elders are affected not only by their historical experiences of discrimination, but also by discrimination that continues in many social and institutional environments. - The marginalization of gay and lesbian seniors in elder care services (2001): In a preliminary research study on the experiences of gay and lesbian elders and their families, gay and lesbian activists, caregivers and elderly gays and lesbians themselves have identified: invisibility, emotional and psychological scarring from past experiences of hatred in health care systems, a lack of voice in aging networks and institutions, fear of discrimination in aging organizations and housing, unsafe social environments, and access barriers to care as major impediments to the health and well-being among elderly gays and lesbians and their families. - La marginalisation des aînés gais et lesbiennes dans les services sociosanitaires aux aînés (2001): Lors d'une recherche exploratoire réunissant les expériences de gais et lesbiennes, de leurs familles et d’activistes gais et lesbiennes ; les aidants naturels et les aînés eux-mêmes ont dénoncé : l'invisibilité, les traumatismes émotifs et psychologiques provenant d'épisodes de haine vécus dans les systèmes de soins de santé, un manque de représentativité dans les réseaux et les institutions pour aînés, la peur de discriminations venant d'organismes d'aînés et du secteur résidentiel, des environnements sociaux non rassurants et la présence d'obstacles à l'accès aux soins comme des facteurs limitatifs importants à la santé et au bien-être des aînés gais et lesbiennes ainsi que de leurs familles. - Discrimination Threatens Gay Elders' Health (2003): Gay and lesbian seniors are facing a serious health threat from discrimination by health care workers and institutions a new study shows.

Gay seniors struggling to find 'safe' retirement housing (2013): Inclusive projects developing slowly in public and private sectors... Located on the doorstep of Church Wellesley Village, Canada's largest LGBT community, Fudger House became a pioneer in the transition to inclusive housing when the City of Toronto designated it an LGBT-positive environment in 2004. Toronto Long-Term Care Homes and Services, which oversees 10 municipal homes including Fudger House, is one of the first municipal departments to introduce an inclusive long-term care initiative... A 2010 report by the City of Vancouver's social policy division found LGBT seniors face issues not experienced by their heterosexual counterparts, making it more difficult for them to navigate the long-term care system. "Some seniors have been closeted their entire lives and fear coming out, some have been rejected by their families and some are experiencing discrimination and homophobia in various settings, including within the home support and residential care systems," the report found.

Residential Programs Expand for LGBT Older Adults in Canada (2013): Located on the doorstep of Church Wellesley Village, Canada’s largest LGBT community, Fudger House became a pioneer in the transition to inclusive housing when the City of Toronto designated it an LGBT-positive environment in 2004. - Residential Programs Expand for LGBT Older Adults in Canada (2013): Located on the doorstep of Church Wellesley Village, Canada’s largest LGBT community, Fudger House became a pioneer in the transition to inclusive housing when the City of Toronto designated it an LGBT-positive environment in 2004. - Gay seniors complex urged for Halifax site (2010): A community group in Halifax is hoping a vacant church will be replaced with a seniors complex that will focus on welcoming gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered seniors. St. John's United Church, on the corner of Windsor and Willow streets in Halifax, has been vacant for two years. Some members of the congregation have applied to the City of Halifax for permission to tear down the building and replace it with a seniors residence complex - to be named Spirit Place. "GLBT-positive is the way that we would say it," said Louisa Horne, a Spirit Place board member. "In all aspects of the complex — while we are welcoming and open and celebrating the diversity of our community and wanting to reflect that diversity - that will be a specific designation." Horne said no one from the gay and transgendered community is turned away from traditional nursing-care homes, but she said life is different for them. "I liken it a little bit to, perhaps, something that we might hear about in the American military. Sort of a 'Don't ask, don't tell' situation for many folks." 

Canada's First Gay and Lesbian Retirement Home (2001). - Caring for gay oldsters: Developer pitches retirement home plan (2000) A developer pitching a retirement home to gay seniors admitted during his sales presentation that he hadn’t thought about ensuring gay-positive staff. “I never thought of the issue,” said developer Bob Forrest. “There are some things here that I need to get sensitized to.” He then committed to making it a number one item on his agenda for discussion. - Older Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Transsexual Persons a report prepared for Toronto's 519 Community Centre (2000, Word 97 Download): More than 150 people as individuals or as members of organizations in the Toronto area participated in this Review of needs and services of older persons who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and transsexual. People and organizations participated through interviews, brainstorming sessions, telephone communications, and informal discussions and input. This was a small sample of persons reflecting something of a cross section of interests, expertise, experience, and knowledge. Many of the participants were persons in their fifties and older. Some were younger – much younger – and were in agencies and organizations that either serve older gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, transgenders, and transsexuals (GLBT) or should be serving that aging population. The stories of, and about, older GLBT individuals, their lives and experiences, and insights were very important lessons in survival, dignity, pain, disappointment, and celebration. Lack of knowledge by services, lack of inclusion of the older GLBT population were often expressions of oversight, lack of visibility, lack of pressure for inclusion, and regrets that this was so. - Gray And Gay On Retirement Day (2003): The Vivat Group, a Canadian gay-owned and operated company, today announced a ground-breaking initiative that will foster the development of a gay and lesbian retirement living community in Ontario.  

Poor, transgendered, and elderly to be protected by proposed amendments (1998):  BC could become the first province in Canada to recognize discrimination based on "gender identity", if a proposed amendment to the BC Human Rights Code is approved. The recommendation, which evolved from the Transgender Law Reform Project sponsored by the BC Law Foundation, is one of eleven the BC Human Rights Commission released January 19. Other reccomendations would probit discrimination based on "social condition", and would extend the protection of the Code to people over 65. According to the Commission, the proposed amendment is "meant to assist people - including transsexuals, transvestites, and people often mistaken for the opposite gender - who challenge what society considers gender norms." Deputy Chief Commissioner Harinder Mahil says nothing currently on the books is specific enough to sufficiently protect the rights of this group. - Growing old gay in a dysfunctional community (2000). - The Greening of the Senior Gay (2000): Obviously the rapid growth of Prime Timers indicates that a long-time need in the male gay community is being met, and we in Edmonton can attest to that. During our first twelve years together my partner and I lived a private, closeted life, making few gay friends and avoiding the gay activities of the younger set. When I was approached by Woody Baldwin to start a group in Edmonton I resisted the invitation. I felt that the attitudes among social and political leaders in the Province, was not gay friendly. However I eventually agreed to try. We had our first meeting n October 1992, and a successful year followed. We now have a membership of 65-70, a solid program of activities, and my partner and I have gained many close gay friendships in Edmonton, which would not have happened, were it not for Prime Timers. - Vivat plans gay/lesbian seniors housing (2003): Research has shown that with fewer life partners and children to assist them in their later years, elderly gays and lesbians have special housing needs.

Canada plans for gay population tally (2003): For the first time Canada will try to figure out just how many gays and lesbians there are in the country. Statistics Canada announced on Wednesday that it will conduct a national survey to ask people if they are gay, lesbian or bisexual. The telephone survey is a follow up on the last census, which for the first time asked how many common-law couples were of the same gender. Called the Canadian Community Health Study, it will survey 130,000 Canadians. The study is conducted every two years, but this is the first time questions about sexuality will be asked.

Comment: We - as gay people - must begin to find our elders - and to support and love them. What can I do to start this process? (as far as I know, in Canada, there is no way to find elder gay and lesbian people!) (See: French Resources) - Editorial Opinion: Gay Primetimers N/A: "Truth be told, being 60 and being gay - hell, being past 35 and being gay - isn’t a picnic, and its all men’s fault. Just as Canadians in general don’t value aging, gay men in particular seem to have almost a phobia about older gay men. They are all but invisible in most circles and tend to school together like fish, segregating in bowling alleys and gay centre's across the land." - Homo sweet home: Xtra West takes a look at existing housing options for queer seniors (2001): And Nichol, a retired accountant and Prime Timers secretary, says co-ops like the Sojourn could be part of the answer to the question of where ageing lesbians and gays can live. For a year now momentum on that very issue has been building in the lesbian and gay community. Although no facility as yet caters specifically to senior lesbians and gays, Xtra West has found three existing housing options that could point the way.

Hammann M, Croteau G (2011). C3 : S3 - Challenges Closets Companions : Seniors Sex Sensuality. Gay Men's Health Summit (GMHS), February, Toronto. PDF Download. We must seriously begin addressing LGBTQ aging! 'None of us should have to even consider or worst yet, face returning to the closet just to survive as Seniors.‛ ... We had an AIDS crisis where we helped our own. We now have an aging crisis where we’re not helping our own. Why?‛ This has to change!

Davis, Lyn (2003). Community Care Inclusion Project. Victoria, B.C: Victoria Lesbian Seniors Care Society. PDF Download. Download Page. Lesbians are everywhere in the Greater Victoria area – even in Sooke! Policy makers and service providers are generally aware that lesbians are part of their clientele but neither policies nor training protocols include anything about lesbian needs. It appears that staff’s behaviour towards lesbian clients is either positive or neutral, but volunteers’ and other clients’ behaviour towards lesbians is more likely to need improvement or be neutral. Policy makers and service providers should amend policies and training protocols to address lesbian needs and to facilitate appropriate behaviour of volunteers and other clients towards lesbians... Lesbians’ primary worry about growing old is lack of financial resources. The next most frequent worries are lack of mobility and agility, isolation, discrimination, and poor health. Although these worries are not substantially different from those of non-lesbian women, homophobia and heterosexism confound these issues. Part of increasing awareness of senior lesbian needs is increasing lesbian visibility. We therefore recommend that service providers include lesbian-positive art, notices, etc., in their facilities. We also recommend that VLSCS assume a higher profile and become a valued senior-serving resource in the Greater Victoria area... When we walked through the public areas of the facilities, none of us felt that we would be visible as lesbians if we were clients of that facility...

Veilleux, Denise (1998). Vieillir en marge, les réseaux informels et formels des lesbiennes âgées. Master's Dissertation, University of Ottawa. PDF Download. Download Page (Translation). La presente these examine l'impact de la stigmatisation sociate du lesbianisme sur les reseaux informels et formels au moment de la vieillesse. Pour ce faire, l'auteure analyse les entrevues dirigees menees avec 19 lesbiennes agees de 50 a 67 ans dans l'Outaouais quebecois et ontarien. Si les relations avec la famille immediate et les enfants sont en general cordiales, elles restent plutot distantes en raison notamment du rejet et de l'occultation de l'identite lesbienne. La crainte des sanctions mene aussi les lesbiennes interviewees a eviter de socialiser avec leurs collegues de travail. Leurs reseaux informels se composent donc surtout d'autres lesbiennes qu'elles frequentent generalement dans leurs foyers respectifs. Leurs contacts avec les reseaux formels, c'est-a-dire les groupes officiels et les diverses activites de la communaute lesbienne et gaie, sont episodiques. L'auteure conclut que l'absence des lesbiennes agees des elements qui composent la vie lesbienne publique et collective pourrait nuire a la realisation de leur projet d'une maison de retraite pour leur vieillesse.

Gay Elder Abuse (2003): If you are under 30 you may not realize it, but yes, there are members of our community over 35.  And, there are lot over 50 and over 70!  Like it or not, we will all be senior citizens some day.  And some, older members of our neighborhood are not being treated particularly well. Elder abuse is not something we usually talk about in our community. But, guess what—elder abuse is an important issue that the rest of the country is looking at; so, we ought to start opening our eyes. For our community, elder abuse is even more pervasive, primarily because our elders are even more vulnerable than their hetero counterparts. Having lived in the closet for most of their lives, many of our elders have become accustomed to sub-standard treatment. Through a lifetime of living in the shadows, many of our seniors have learned not to ask questions, not to question authority and never, ever tell. Bluntly put, our seniors are primed for abuse.

Gay Seniors (Canada). - Gay Seniors, Canada news items archive: 2005 to 2008. - Association des Personnes Retraités Gaies.  


Europe

First ever effort to address multiple discrimination suffered by older LGBTI people in Europe (2012): In the framework of the 2012 European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations, AGE Platform Europe (AGE) and ILGA-Europe have decided to focus on the situation of older LGBTI people in Europe. In a joint policy paper, which has been launched today, at a conference in Paris the two NGOs suggest best practices and policy recommendations to help older LGBTI people going through those life stage transitions. In the policy paper AGE and ILGA-Europe have identified four main challenges faced by older LGBTI people: 1. The lack of recognition of same-sex couples has an impact on their access to social protection and on their financial security. This becomes particularly worrying when people get older and cannot ensure that their partner will have access to their pensions and assets.  2. Older LGBTI people may have specific health needs and may face ongoing stigmatisation in the field of healthcare.  3. Some elderly LGBTI people experience social exclusion and invisibility and cannot rely on the same family support as other older people.  4. This raises specific challenges related to long-term care, inclusive of older LGBTI people needs. 

AGE Platform Europe [AGE] and The European Region of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association [IGLA-Europe] (2012). Equality for older lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex people in Europe. PDF Doiwnload. Download Page. This paper highlights a number of specific difficulties faced by older LGBTI people. • The lack of recognition of same-sex couples has an impact on their access to social protection and on their financial security. This becomes particularly worrying when people get older and cannot ensure that their (dependent) partner will have access to their pensions and assets. • Older LGBTI people, and in particular, older trans and intersex persons, may have specific health needs and may face ongoing stigmatisation in the field of healthcare. • Some older LGBTI people experience social exclusion and invisibility and cannot rely on the same family support as other older people. This raises specific challenges related to whether long-term care is inclusive of older LGBTI people needs. In addition to those core issues, it is important to note that most older LGBTI people may have concealed their sexual orientation or gender identity during their life or parts of it due to social and legal stigma in which they have lived and they very much fear having to hide this again, at times, as they get older. Furthermore, older LGBTI people are also victims of the stigma attached to ageing, including within their own LGBTI communities. Furthermore, it seems that the presumption that older people are asexual is still very strong in society’s collective unconscious. As a result, it is difficult for a number of people to acknowledge that older people carry on their diverse sexual orientations into their old age.

Older Women's Network (2000, Europe) (Home Page): "The OWN, Europe supporter Elizabeth Sclater has been invited to speak at the Older Women's Conference, which took place in Orvieto-Italy in February 2000. Elizabeth was there in her role of Social inclusion and Equalities Manager at the London Borough of Lewisham... In 1996 my local authority adopted six equality themes: ...Addressing the needs of lesbians and gay men - in any population at least 10% will be lesbian or gay. Often a ’hidden’ group we need to be sensitive to their needs. Particularly those of older gay men and older lesbians." - Lesbians design their old age (2000, Germany): In summer 1997, Safia members established a Lesbian Foundation called Sappho. The aim of the Foundation is to create conditions so that Lesbians – in their old age – can live together in new forms of housing and living. It is the first Foundation of its kind run by and for Lesbians. - Germany's Gay and Gray Get a New Home (2008): Discrimination is a fact of life for gays and lesbians over 60, and fears about going to an old people's home are widespread. But a new batch of care services in Germany are catering specifically to aging homosexuals -- and demand will likely grow. - Retirement home for gay elderly (2002, Sweden): Elderly gay people in Sweden will soon be able to retire to a collective home of their own, news agency TT reported this week. - Netherlands: Don't Mention the Kids: Elderly Gays Find Togetherness in L.A. Ries House (2002): An increasing number of homes for the elderly in The Netherlands focus on a specific target group, so that elderly people can choose a place where they will feel at home. One example is the L.A. Ries House in Amsterdam, which accommodates seven elderly gay men.

Berlin Gets First Gay Old Age Home (2004). Now, as the first openly gay generation grows greyer and contemplates retirement, developers in Berlin are planning an assisted-care retirement home specifically for homosexuals, a place that will allow gays to grow old surrounded by other gays. The 10-million-dollar old-age home in the up-scale Schoeneberg district of Berlin will rise six storeys, offering residents 40 spacious apartments, a caf.e and function room facilities. In addition, the post-modern design by Berlin architect Christian Hamm provides 16 nursing-care flats with 24-hour staffing. A health- care centre with physicians, therapists and a "wellness" gym is also incorporated into the plan. - Gay life: Europe's first gay nursing home opens (2008): Europe's first gay nursing home opens Europe's first gay nursing home has opened in Berlin, with out-and-proud gay Mayor Klaus Wowereit publicly supporting the ground-breaking project, which culminates years of planning and fund-raising. - Berlin opens Europe's first home for elderly gays, lebians and bisexuals (2012). - LGBT housing project unites generations out in Berlin (2012): Gay pensioners persecuted by Nazis live alongside young workers in pioneering community... "What all our residents have in common is that they wanted to live together with other gays and lesbians," says Marco Pulver of Berlin's gay and lesbian advisory service, which is behind the €6m project, Lebensort Vielfalt (Diverse Living Space). "Many of our older residents spent their youth and often a large amount of their adult life in gay-hostile environments... Pulver insists that although 60% of the space is reserved for men over 55, the project is far more than just a retirement home for men. Women, as well as younger men, live there too. The youngest is 31-year-old Robert Franke, an accountant at a local yoga centre, who says he jumped at the chance when he was told he could apply for a flat in the housing project. - Alexander’s: Opened in 1997, Alexander’s is mainly a pickup bar [in Munich] where older men meet their hustlers.

Pink 50+ (Netherlands): Pink 50+ Consortium aims to raise awareness among institutions who provide services to the elderly, to increase their understanding that they have LGBT  (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) clients with special needs. The consortium is led by COC Netherlands and includes ANBO, COC, MOVISIE  and Schorer as partners. In a 4-year project funded by the Ministry, the consortium is developing a Gay Straight Alliance for the Ageing. This Alliance has several main programmes and outcomes, including: ...

Spain's first gay retirement home passes its first hurdle (2012): Madrid suburb cedes land for project as gay NGO plans home 'where no one will have to hide their sexuality'. - Spain's first gay and lesbian retirement home hopes to be up and running by 2014 (2012).

Effects of Age on Spiritual Well-being and Homonegativity: Religious Identity and Practices Among LGB Persons in Portugal (2013): The present study explored the effects of age on spiritual well-being and internalized homonegativity among Portuguese lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) persons. A set of questionnaires were filled out by 471 LGB participants using the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identity Scale; the Spiritual Well-being Scale; and the Multidimensional Measurement of Religiousness and Spirituality. While most participants had been raised Catholic, only 17% currently belonged to a religious denomination. Participants higher in religious well-being were more likely to have concerns in concealing their sexual identity. Existential well-being was related to higher identity affirmation. Older participants reported better spiritual well-being and lower homonegativity.

More than half of LGBT Italian people fear getting older (2012): A survey conducted by a union and an LGBT association finds that, for the elderly, 'being straight is better than being gay'. - Same sex acts involving older men. An ethnographic study (2013): The meaning of adult development and aging of sexual minorities is little understood in Italy. For the first time in history, a generation of self-identified gay men is approaching retirement, and yet we do not understand what well-being and successful development in later life mean in this community. Moreover, the aging processes among gay men who are already in their retirement years, many of whom are still “closeted,” remain invisible. The ethnographic report, based on two years of participant observation, reveals the culture of the gay bath and the social and sexual spaces of older and younger gay men and their self-definitions and relationship to the “gay community”.

French documentary on gay seniors strikes timely chord (2012): Sébastien Lifshitz’s “Les Invisibles”, a documentary about elderly gay French people, hits screens as France finds itself embroiled in debate over gay marriage and adoption. FRANCE 24 spoke to the director of an (unintentionally) topical film... F24: Why don’t the people you interview in the film directly address the current debate over same-sex marriage and adoption in France? S.L.: I didn’t want the film to be overtly political. My goal was to present life stories without pushing any message. Also, not all the people I interviewed had been involved in activism. Generally, I don’t like this notion of a gay “community” that lives in one neighbourhood and thinks the same way. Gay people are individuals who live among others and want to participate in the construction and advancement of society. There is no such thing as a single gay destiny or identity. That’s what the film shows: totally different experiences. - Katie Callan's Photo Essays: Gay Retirement.
 
Sweden moves closer to nursing homes for gays (2009): While the idea of creating an elderly-living facility catering specifically to members of Stockholm’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transsexual communities has been around for more than a decade, plans are finally starting to move forward in earnest. According to Christer Fällman, a project leader for the planned Regnbågen (‘Rainbow’) nursing home, many gays in Sweden are interested in having the option of spending their final years in an environment suited to their particular needs. - ClubSilver: For older gay men and their admirers: younger gay males.

Outrage in Denmark After Priest Refuses to Bury Lesbian (2012): The priest's actions did not go over well in liberal Denmark... A Danish priest says he erred when he refused to bury an elderly woman after discovering she was gay. The deceased's daughter was infuriated, saying the priest refused the funeral in front of her mother's octagenarian partner. The older women had been together for decades, and in a domestic partnership for nearly 30 years.

Being LGBT in Norway: There is still prejudice in parts of the heterosexual population. It is harder to be open about being LGBT for young people than for adults, but even harder for elderly people who often go back into the closet when they start depending on public welfare services. It is harder in small places than bigger places. It is harder within many ethnical minorities than in the majority group. It can be especially hard in some religious societies.

The Relation Between Social Embeddedness and Loneliness among Older Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adults in the Netherlands (2009): Compared with their heterosexual peers, older LGBs were more likely to have experienced divorce, to be childless or to have less intensive contact with their children. They also had less intensive contact with other members of their families and they were less frequent churchgoers. Their weaker level of social embeddedness, however, only partially explained the stronger feelings of loneliness among older LGB adults. Nor could their higher levels of loneliness be attributed to other, non-social embeddedness factors (health, living conditions, self-esteem, and socioeconomic status). Emphasis on other aspects of social embeddedness, such as the quality of social relationships in the private domain and minority stress, is an important challenge for future research.

Hoff, Andreas (2008). Tackling Poverty and Social Exclusion of Older People – Lessons from Europe. Oxford Institute of Ageing, Workign Paper 308. PDF Download. Germany: Work with older gays and lesbians: Finally, we think another project catering for gay and lesbian people who are approaching retirement age is a noteworthy example of good practice since it highlights the problems faced by people who had to fight for social acceptance, participation and inclusion for most of their lives and are facing a new risk of social exclusion when they approach the transition to retirement. Homosexuality in old age has remained a taboo theme until today (Heaphy 2004). Their heterosexual family members often do not accept their homosexuality and exclude them from their family life. The organisation RUBICON provides support and social contacts for older homosexuals and offers help with setting up self-help groups for people in this situation...  Note: GLBT issues not mentioned anywhere else.

Valls, Jordi (2010). Homosexuality and elderly people: opening avenues at nursing homes in Barcelona. The Hague, the Netherlands: European Rainbow Cities. PDF Download. Context: On the context of the European AHEAD project... Mission entrusted by Barcelona City Council and the UAB Public Policies and Government Institute (IGOP)... The UAB Aging Institute has prepared and is implementing a scheme in nursing homes to combat homophobia in these environments. Starting point: homophobia is present in nursing homes and it hinders elderly gay and lesbian people from becoming more involved. 

Lis K, Reichert M, Cosack A, Billings J, Brown P (Ed.) (2008). Evidence-Based Guidelines on Health Promotion for Older People. Vienna:  Austrian Red Cross. PDF Download. Some gay / lesbian issues noted generally as related to the Duitch “Buddy Care for Homosexual Elderly People / Pink Buddies” program in Amsterdam.

Serenade Estate (2007 TO 2007, Prague): Conceived to provide a dedicated retirement complex for the [European] Gay Community. The masterplan offers an affordable residential community crafted with inspired interior and landscapes of sculpted greens. It is a community where the gay lifestyle  is defined at its best and comfortable living that spell out good life. - EuroGaySeniors GLBT community (2007 To 2008). - Elderly pink living society (2005):  Many gay people feel like outsiders most of their lives; when growing old, this feeling only increases. Elderly gays who don't have children or other relatives are often quite lonely. All this has prompted Jan Lutje Schipholt and Jos Boël to try to set up a so-called 'pink living society', to enable gay people to grow old together in a shared apartment building.


To "The SEARCH Section" For The Best Search Engines & Information Directories, The Searchable Sites to Locate Papers & Abstracts... and The Sites - Some Searchable - Where "Free Papers" Are Available!

French Speaking

Conférence: « Vieillir LGBT : Ouvrir la porte au dialogue » Quel droit au choix pour les personnes âgées LGBT ? organisée par le Centre LGBT Paris-Île de France (2012, Translation, Alternate Link). - Vieillir LGBT (2012, Translation): Une conférence s'est tenue à Paris à l'initiative du Centre LGBT. Un thème avec lequel les gays ont beaucoup de mal ! ... A la conférence « vieillir LGBT » organisée le week end dernier par le Centre LGBT le constat était moins fou (folle !) : les vieux gays sont simplement un peu plus seuls, ils ne peuvent pas compter sur le traditionnel réseau de solidarité familial, ils portent souvent sur leurs épaules le poids d’une vie passée à dissimuler son homosexualité et ils ont pris en pleine gueule l’épidémie de sida. Alors ils compensent et s’adaptent en cultivant d’autres rapports solidaires, ceux que l’on a avec les amis, qui constituent une autre famille, choisie celle-là ! Même que les vieux célibataires rêvent encore de rencontres et ne désespèrent pas de trouver le partenaire avec qui ils aimeraient partager leurs vieux jours. Enfin ils se cultivent plus que les autres car ils ont le temps !  Actuellement c’est une nouvelle génération de gays qui va parvenir à la retraite, notamment ceux qui ont été les acteurs du mouvement homosexuel des années 70-80. Cette conférence faisait justement le point sur toutes les initiatives en cours. A Los Angeles il existe déjà une maison de retraite à la mode américaine... - Age et LGBT : vieillir et accueillir sans discrimination (2013, Translation): Et, alors que Najat Vallaud-Belkacem proposait, la veille, une rencontre pour faire le point sur le plan de lutte contre l’homophobie et la transphobie, la ministre annonçait ce jour une nouvelle mesure prise conjointement avec Michèle Delaunay dans le cadre de ce plan : une mission pour poser "la réalité et les problématiques du vieillissement des LGBT et de l’impact du sida sur une communauté vieillissante" confiée à trois associations : SOS Homophobie, le Groupe SOS et AIDES.

La réalité des lesbiennes: Quand le troisième âge renie le «troisième sexe»  (2011, Translation): Il y a quelques années, en visionnant Si les murs racontaient 2 [Vanessa Redgrave dans «If These Walls Could Talk 2»], je pleurais à chaudes larmes devant la tragédie que vivaient les deux dames âgées. Devant le décès de l’une, l’autre se retrouvait sans le sou, reniée par la famille de sa compagne. Scénario hollywoodien? Évidemment. Inspiré de la vie réelle? Certainement. Si le scénario paraît tragique, nous pourrions malheureusement en citer plusieurs. Vieillir lesbienne est une réalité encore difficile, particulièrement au sein de nos établissements de santé et services sociaux. Vieillir lesbienne, c’est vivre une double, voire même une triple discrimination, au regard de l’orientation sexuelle, de l’âge et du sexe. Et le pire scénario, est certainement celui de vieillir lesbienne en CHSLD. Pourquoi? D’abord, par ce que les mentalités sont ce qu’elles sont. À l’heure où j’écris ces lignes, dire à vos potes de la résidence que vous êtes lesbienne, reste impen-sable. C’est l’exclusion assurée. Ainsi, garder le silence, c’est terminer ses jours avec une «certaine» quiétude. Mais le silence a un prix. Aucune lesbienne ne veut retourner au placard à 80 ans, ou décéder dedans!

« Âge et Homosexualité » : quels sont les grands défis du vieillissement de la communauté homosexuelle ? (Trtanslation): L’Association nationale de réflexions « Homosexualités Et Socialisme » (HES) qui porte des propositions sur les questions lesbiennes, gaies, bi et trans (LGBT) depuis 20 ans, a mis en place une commission baptisée « Âge et Solidarité » qui réfléchit aux grandes questions liées au vieillissement des personnes homosexuelles. A l’occasion de la mise en place d’un questionnaire destiné à identifier les difficultés, les doutes et les aspirations des personnes LGBT face au vieillissement, Jérome Brézillon responsable des Commissions pour HES, a répondu aux questions de Senioractu.com... « Vieillir Gay » est une problématique en soit. Les personnes LGBT âgées d’aujourd’hui ont connu de multiples révolutions sociétales qui les affectent encore aujourd’hui même s’ils n’en sont pas les principaux acteurs. De nos jours, nul ne peut contester le droit à la liberté de vivre son orientation sexuelle. Les questions qui se posent aux jeunes homosexuels aujourd’hui ne sont pas celles qui se posaient à leurs aînés.  Le silence, l’absence de communication institutionnelle sur ces sujets ont induit un modèle de développement personnel très différent de celui des nouvelles générations. Combien de personnes LGBT âgées nous ont expliqué que le PaCS, que les plus jeunes ont adopté, ne leur correspondait pas ? Les personnes LGBT âgées, souvent, ne veulent que vivre comme elles l’entendent, tout en apportant leur histoire, leur vécu, et leurs difficultés rencontrées jadis.  On ne peut pas parler de vieillissement sans affronter les problèmes de santé, de transmissions de patrimoine, mais bien plus encore d’accompagnement, sous le signe de la dignité. Tout le monde sait que le vieillissement s’accompagne d’un ralentissement du métabolisme, qui souvent s’aggrave par des maladies, diverses et variées. Ces dernières peuvent être une simple gêne, ou au contraire, peuvent conduire à une hospitalisation lourde.  Malheureusement, souvent, le VIH rend la situation très complexe. J’ajouterai au passage que les transsexuel(le)s âgé(e)s découvrent une situation inédite : être vieux et trans. La société aujourd’hui ne sait pas comment répondre. Et c’est bien en cela qu’HES veut apporter quelque chose : apporter des réponses à des situations nouvelles, qu’elle accompagne par des propositions fortes.

Mais parlons "vieillissement" (2012, Pierre Guénin, Translation):  Je peux encore  fréquenter les bars  et les discothèques sans provoquer la moquerie.  Quand on sait que chez les gays,  passé la quarantaine, on vous considère souvent comme.... une denrée périssable, c'est plutôt un exploit !!!  Il est vrai que vieillir chez les gays est pire que chez les hétéros qui ont  ( en principe !!), famille et enfants pour les aider. Être pacsé avec un compagnon adoucit les choses mais être gay, vieux et seul devient  réellement dramatique...  Je constate qu'en 2012 les couples sont dix fois plus nombreux que dans les années 50.  L'horrible sida aurait-il favorisé la fidélité et diminuer l'inextinguible drague ?    LGBT, m'a-t-on dit, parle de «maisons de retraites pour gays ». L'image est triste et drôle à la fois. J'imagine une sorte de "cages aux folles" sur le retour, moins foldingues, hélas, que celle de Zaza Napolli. - L'homosexualité des personnes âgées: briser le mur du silence (2009): L'homosexualité demeure un grand tabou dans les résidences pour personnes âgées. Et le ministère responsable des Aînés au Québec a décidé de les aider à briser le silence. Un homme âgé n'ose pas poser la photographie de son conjoint sur sa table de chevet, par crainte du jugement de ses pairs. Une femme maquille son passé de lesbienne lorsqu'elle doit partager son repas avec les autres usagers du centre d'accueil où elle vit. Par peur de l'ostracisme ou du harcèlement, les aînés vivant en résidences pour personnes âgées cachent leur homosexualité, ce qui fait d'eux une population vulnérable à l'isolement. C'est la conclusion à laquelle sont venus deux organismes de soutien aux homosexuels, Gai Écoute et le Réseau des lesbiennes du Québec, au moment de remettre leurs mémoires respectifs à la commission des aînés tenue en 2008. Dans les faits, le tabou entourant l'homosexualité est tel que les deux organismes n'ont réussi à trouver aucun homosexuel avoué dans les centres d'hébergement pour personnes âgées du Québec.

Les Invisibles (2012, Translation): trois extraits commentés par Sébastien Lifshitz, réalisateur. Ils ont vécu leur homosexualité en des temps moins tolérants. Ce sont eux, “Les Invisibles”. Le cinéaste Sébastien Lifshitz leur a consacré un film, dont il commente trois scènes. - Les Invisibles Directed by Sébastien Lifshitz (2013): Director Sébastien Lifshitz asked eight gay and lesbian people to tell the world about their lives. None of them worked in fashion, retail or banking, nor were they "gym bunnies" that were obsessed with vanity. Instead, Lifshitz explored the lives of a cross-section of French men and women aged between 70 and 80 that were born between the wars and share one unifying characteristic: they are all homosexual. One is a sheep farmer and another couple owns a small goat cheese company. These men and women are far removed from the urban cliché of famous gay people as reflected in the media. Some of them have experienced combativeness in revolutionary gay movements in the 1970s, such as the FHAR (Front Homosexuel d'Action Révolutionnaire) or the GLH (Groupe de Libération Homosexuelle). They occasionally speak about the judgment they have experienced within their families and relatives but the unifying trajectory is that they have managed to make their way despite this.

« Les Invisibles » : homosexuels et amoureux, au début du siècle dernier (2012, Translation): Ils ont 70, 80, 90 ans… Ils sont homosexuels et amoureux ou en quête d’amour. Face caméra, ils racontent. Au final, le documentaire « Les Invisibles » de Sébastien Lifshitz est limpide, pas prétentieux, clairement bouleversant. - Sébastien Lifshitz : "Es-tu un homme libre ?" (2012, Interview, Translation): Comment est venue l'idée du film ? J'adore aller dans les brocantes, fouiller dans des cartons tout pourris... Un jour, je suis tombé sur un album des années 1950, rempli de photos de deux vieilles dames, de style plutôt bourgeois. Je me suis demandé : s'agit-il de deux soeurs, de deux amies ou de deux amantes ? Le brocanteur avait encore dix albums, que des Kodachromes. Je les ai tous pris... Chez moi, je me suis plongé dans ces photos, et il m'est apparu évident que ces deux femmes formaient un couple. Elles s'étaient fait photographier par un professionnel, elles avaient donc accepté d'afficher leur amour. J'avais un témoignage de visibilité, de bonheur, alors que l'histoire officielle nous a souvent parlé de destins tragiques. - French filmmaker Sebastien Lifshitz provides an insightful glimpse into the lives of older gay men and lesbians, their past and their present (2012): This is not the familiar celebration of heroic pioneers who fought their way out of the margins and broke down barriers for subsequent generations. While discrimination is certainly acknowledged, what’s most disarming about Les Invisibles is the absence of victimhood. Instead, it’s a more uncommon view of lives lived, often with difficulty, compromise and loneliness, but ultimately with a joyous sense of self-discovery that is equally inspiring and perhaps even militant. If there’s a unifying theme to the stories of the eleven men and women here – all of them over 70 – it’s that each individual has his or her unique road away from denial and secrecy toward personal freedom.

Les Invisibles (2012, Translation, Amazon):- Le 15 octobre prochain sortira en librairie le livre Les Invisibles contenant une large sélection de photographies amateur issues de la collection de Sébastien Lifshitz. Sur la 4ème de couverture, on peut lire : "En 2012, Sébastien Lifshitz réalise Les Invisibles, un documentaire dans lequel il donne la parole à des hommes et des femmes nés dans l’entre-deux-guerres, et dont le point commun est d’avoir voulu vivre leur homosexualité au grand jour. Collectionneur de clichés amateurs depuis une vingtaine d’années, le réalisateur a commencé par amasser des images des années 1900 à 1960 représentant des couples homosexuels, avérés, probables ou qui "jouent à". Les images dans leur ensemble témoignent d’une liberté incroyable, loin des idées reçues qui présentent invariablement l’homosexualité du côté de la lutte, du secret ou de la souffrance. C’est cette étonnante collection qui a donné à Sébastien Lifshitz l’idée de redonner une voix à ces anonymes dans son film. Révéler ces photos aujourd’hui est pour lui l’occasion de témoigner autrement de la vie de ces gens et de leur époque, et c’est aussi un retour à la source du succès qu’a été Les Invisibles." ... Après avoir reçu "L'Etoile d'or" du meilleur film documentaire, prix décerné par l'ensemble de la presse, Les Invisibles vient de remporter le César du meilleur film documentaire de l'année.

Pour que vieillir soit gai: Un programme novateur (Trasnslation): En partenariat avec Gai Écoute, la Fondation Émergence propose un programme d’information et de sensibilisation aux réalités gaies lesbiennes, bisexuelles et transgenres (LGBT) destiné aux personnes qui oeuvrent auprès des personnes aînées ou qui les côtoient...La Fondation Émergence propose une trousse d’information et de sensibilisation à travers une série d’outils et de jeux qui visent à favoriser la discussion et à mieux faire connaître la réalité des aînés LGBT. Les outils de la trousse :  Affiche     Autocollant  Capsules vidéos  Charte de bientraitance   Dépliant    Diaporama et guide d'animation  Fiches d'information  Filmographie (PDF)  Jeux et exercices  Napperon  Recensement des études. - Sensibiliser les personnes âgées pour que vieillir soit gai (2011, Translation): Disons que vous avez vécu hors du placard toute votre vie adulte ou presque, que vous vous êtes construit tout un réseau d’amis majoritairement gais et, qu’arrivé à votre retraite, vous vous retrouvez, pour une quelconque raison, dans une résidence de personnes âgées. Vous n’êtes pas marié et n’avez pas de femme ou d’enfants qui viennent vous visiter. Ah bon? Allez-vous subir de la discrimination, de l’homophobie, être isolé par le groupe? La génération des plus de 70 ans n’est peut-être pas si ouverte que les autres qui ont suivi. La Fondation Émergence vient apporter quelques pistes de solutions en lançant une «Charte de bientraitance», au cours de la semaine des Célébrations de la Fierté Montréal.

Les LGBT vieillissent aussi (2012, Translation): Dans le cadre des manifestations de la journée contre l’homophobie, Radio-Canada diffusera le 18 mai à 21h dans le cadre de Zone doc, le documentaire «70 ans et... au placard», produit par Médiatique Inc. en collaboration avec Radio-Canada concernant le vieillissement de la population francophone homosexuelle en Ontario. Le documentaire suit Jean-Rock Boutin dans sa recherche sur les différentes expériences vécues par les personnes homosexuelles dans le cadre de leurs soins de santé.

Le vieillir gay (2009, Translation): Les gays et les lesbiennes du baby boom, comme les autres, ont connu trop de choses extraordinaires pendant les années 70 et 80 pour survivre dans des maisons de retraite traditionnelles où leur identité serait réduite à néant après des années d’indépendance culturelle. Ces hommes et ces femmes ont appartenu à la génération qui a imposé beaucoup de changements à la société et ils se demandent pourquoi leur fin de vie ne bénéficierait pas, elle aussi, de ces idées novatrices. Ce sont eux qui ont milité et manifesté dans les rues. Leur vieillesse ne peut donc pas être le moment où la normalité aurait son ultime revanche. Ils ont droit à une spécificité en matière de vieillesse, comme ils en ont une dans la sexualité et la culture. Si la société et la communauté LGBT ne parviennent pas de trouver des structures permettant de vivre ces dernières années de manière correcte et décente, ce sera le pire échec de l’intégration. Différents, vous pouviez l’être quand vous êtes adultes. Mais vous ne pouvez pas vivre cette différence avec la vieillesse et la mort ?

Vieillir gay (2010, Translation): Aux deux extrémités de la vie, la sexualité est un tabou. C’est une chose dont on ne parle pas, comme si ce silence en effaçait l’existence. Il va sans dire que dans ces conditions, l’homosexualité est encore plus difficile à vivre. Trop jeune ou trop vieux suivant le cas, nous serions donc condamnés à n’avoir qu’une courte vie sexuelle, circonscrite à une période la plus étroite possible. - Comment vieillissons-nous et comment voulons-nous vieillir ? (2007, Translation): La vieillesse serait-elle un tabou dans nos communautés ? Et pourtant, à l'image de nos sociétés qui ne parlent que de jeunesse, de beauté et de santé, les gais vieillissent et ne souhaitent pas forcément redevenir invisibles, absents, ou retourner dans le placard. Peu d'études à ce jour ont tracé le portrait de nos aînés. Pas d'enquêtes fouillées pour savoir quelles sont leurs aspirations et leurs inquiétudes face au défi de l'âge avançant. Et cela ne se limite pas seulement au fait de ne plus «pogner» dans les bars, ou encore de multiplier les artifices pour cacher les marques du temps. Comme le soulignait un de nos répondants, «notre vieillesse sera à l'image de ce que nous avons été», entendre que notre caractère, nos expériences heureuses et malheureuses, auront eu une incidence sur la façon dont nous aborderons la vieillesse. - La peur de vieillir chez les gays: un court-métrage (2004): Fast forward, un court-métrage réalisé en 2004 par Alexis Van Stratum. - Suicide: la cote d'alerte chez les gays (2013, Translation): On pourrait penser que le mariage pour tous allait encourager le mieux vivre des gays. C'est le contraire qui se passe. Et c'est très compréhensible...

Bessin M, Blidon M (2011). Déprises sexuelles : penser le vieillissement et la sexualité [Thinking aging and sexuality]. Genre, sexualité & société, 6, Autromne. Full Text. Translation. La sociologie de la vieillesse est passée d’une analyse fonctionnaliste du désengagement à une approche constructionniste en termes de déprise, oubliant trop souvent la sexualité. Les auteur-e-s appellent à penser davantage les processus d’ajustement aux circonstances de la vie, à partir d’une analyse des déprises sexuelles qui articule ensemble genre et parcours de vie, sexe et âge, en tenant compte des facteurs relationnels comme le veuvage. L’article explore également les limites et les possibilités de renouvellement des pratiques en vieillissant, quelle que soit sa sexualité. Il se termine en appelant à davantage de recherches sur le sujet, capables d’améliorer nos connaissances sur une thématique dynamique, propice à une réflexion éthique renouvelée.

Chamberland L, Paquin J (2004)Vieillir en étant soi-même, Le défi de l’adaptation des services résidentiels aux besoins des lesbiennes âgées. ARIR (Alliance de recherche entre l’Institut de recherches et d’études féministes (IREF) de l’UQAM et Relais-Femmes), UQAM, RLQ/QLN, Montréal 2004. Le condensé de  « Vieillir en étant soi-même » a été rendu possible grâce à une subvention du Réseau des Ministère de la famille et des aînés. Diane Heffernan, coordinatrice lesbiennes du Québec. Word Download. Translation. Le but recherché est la mise en place de diverses mesures pour constituer un environnement confortable, réceptif et respectueux, peu importe le choix final de « le dire ou le taire » fait par les résidentes lesbien¬nes. Dans plusieurs cas, une telle adaptation ne nécessite que des changements mineurs au fonctionne¬ment des résidences : la modification de la culture institutionnelle et l’investissement dans la formation. Le mur de l’invisibilité constitue le principal obstacle à l’adaptation des services résidentiels. L’homo¬sexua¬lité constitue encore un sujet tabou au sein de la population âgée rési¬den¬te, et les lesbiennes qui s’affirment comme telles font figure d’exception, surtout en l’absen¬ce de signaux positifs provenant de l’institution. Cela n’étonne guère si l’on prend en considéra¬tion leur vécu antérieur marqué par un contexte social plus hostile, le sentiment de vulnérabilité qui s’accentue avec l’âge, l’absen¬ce d’anonymat dans un milieu plus ou moins fermé sur lui-même, la dépendance face aux fournisseurs de services et au personnel d’encadrement. Il s’en dégage un cercle vicieux où les résidences ne croient pas héberger de lesbiennes et où les lesbiennes n’osent pas s’identifier...  Finalement, la recherche permettrait de mieux documenter cette question. Une récente étude du Réseau québécois d’action pour la santé des femmes (RQASF) documente les problèmes et les insatisfactions des lesbiennes face aux services sociaux et de santé, Pour le dire… Rendre les services sociaux et les services de santé accessibles aux lesbiennes.

Chamberland, Line (2010). Le  vieillissement chez les lesbiennes : y a-t-il des enjeux spécifiques ? Labrys, études féministes / estudos feministas, janvier/juin. Full Text. Translation. Après avoir fait le constat de l’invisibilité sociale du lesbianisme chez les femmes âgées tant dans les milieux institutionnels dans les représentations sociales et scientifiques, cet article propose une synthèse des connaissances actuelles sur le vieillissement chez les lesbiennes à partir d’études principalement nord-américaines. D’emblée, il souligne la diversité des réalités des lesbiennes âgées dont les conditions de vie varient selon leurs trajectoires de vie antérieures (maritale, parentale, de travail, etc.) et selon une série de facteurs tels la classe sociale, l’origine ethnoculturelle ou le milieu de vie urbain ou rural. L’isolement social, le manque de soutien, particulièrement sur les plans affectif et psychologique, l’insécurité financière constituent les principales préoccupations. Les études sur l’adaptation psychosociale des lesbiennes au vieillissement brossent des portraits contrastés: certaines mettent l’accent sur les effets cumulés ou irréversibles de l’oppression qu’elles ont subie tout au long de leur vie, tandis que d’autres soutiennent que celles qui sont parvenues à affirmer leurs préférences sexuelles, malgré les limitations sociales qui leur étaient imposées, ont acquis par là même des compétences qui les aident à faire face aux défis de cette nouvelle étape de la vie.

Vincent-Titéca, Christophe (2009/2010). Les personnes agées homosexuelles Face à l’absence de solidarité familiale. Soutenir et conforter les solidarités amicales. L’amitié inspiratrice et support de projets gérontologiques. Master's Diddertation, Universite de Marseille. PDF Download. Download Page. L’étude-projet d’ingénierie sociale dont il question dans ce rapport a commencé en novembre 2009. Le thème que nous souhaitions traiter étant le « vieillir gay », c’est à Paris, au sein de l’association Les Gays Retraités que l’étude s’est déroulée. Les membres de cette association étant exclusivement des hommes, nous avons fait le choix d’aborder notre étude sous l’angle de l’homosexualité masculine. Nous abordons tout d’abord le contexte de l’étude : L’histoire particulière vécue par les personnes que nous avons interrogées, au travers de l’évolution de l’homosexualité dans les représentations sociales et dans ses propres structures de représentations, et des évolutions de la législation. Nous présentons 2 études et projets choisis respectivement en France et au Canada, ainsi qu’un extrait d’article paru dans une revue sur le sujet de la vieillesse et de l’homosexualité en France. Et nous détaillons les acteurs associatifs concernés et impliqués par cette problématique, et les activités qu’ils mènent actuellement. C’est ce contexte qui nous a conduits à nous intéresser au problème de notre étude : l’absence de solidarités familiales chez les personnes âgées homosexuelles. Le problème étant posé, l’étude à pu débuter, dans le cadre d’une démarche d’ingénierie sociale dont nous présentons la méthodologie. Nous avons réalisé 16 entretiens avec des hommes âgés de 58 à 91 ans constituant un groupe cible contrasté. L’analyse de ces entretiens nous a permis de distinguer les demandes, besoins et attentes des personnes considérées, et d’appréhender certaines caractéristiques particulières des personnes âgées homosexuelles. Les conclusions de l’analyse nous permettent de proposer en fin de dossier des actions possibles à mettre en oeuvre avec les acteurs associatifs concernés pour répondre au problème posé. 

La Société canadienne du sida / Canadian AIDS Society (2006). Vieillir bien, l’âgisme et les hommes gais. PDF Download. L’âgisme est la notion d’après laquelle les gens ont des possibilités limitées en raison de leur âge. L’âgisme peut affecter les jeunes ou les plus vieux. Au cours d’une vie moyenne de 75 ans, la plupart des gens ne sont considérés jeunes que pendant un court moment. La période de vieillesse est considérée plus longue... Les hommes gais plus âgés (et les jeunes gais) peuvent rencontrer à la fois de l’homophobie et de l’âgisme. On trouve un exemple de cela dans le stéréotype du vieux gai pédophile. Ce stéréotype qui est non fondé pourrait d’ailleurs être dissipé par des programmes de mentorat positif entre les hommes gais jeunes et les plus âgés. -  Vieillir avec le sida, pas si simple: Les thérapies permettent de vivre longtemps avec le VIH mais les barrières sociales demeurent (2012): Une journée pour une vie. Ce 1er décembre voué à la lutte contre le sida permet un constat : oui, trente ans après les premiers constats sur l'épidémie et les morts rapides des premiers patients, on peut vieillir avec le VIH, désormais considéré comme une maladie chronique bien traitée. Mais à quel prix ? La relative confiance dans les multithérapies, entraîne un retour des pratiques à risque - relations sexuelles sans préservatif avec plusieurs partenaires - , particulièrement chez les homosexuels. Cela, avec d'autres causes comme les drogues "festives".

Beausoleil, Jacques (1996). Homosexualité et vieillissement. Conférence donnée au colloque Le vieillissement et la santé mentale organisé par l'Association canadienne de santé mentale - Montréal. Full Text. Translation. Il est triste de constater que les professionnels de l'intervention sociale qui se présentent comme les spécialistes de la souffrance ou de la détresse humaine, à moins d'en avoir été eux-mêmes les victimes, sont incapables de franchir les barrières du tabou et des préjugés véhiculés par la société qui les entoure. Nombre de chercheurs universitaires et d'intervenants professionnels, même gais, hésitent à s'attaquer à ce sujet de peur de rater leur carrière. Je ne puis les blâmer car l'ai vécu moi-même dans mon travail. Si une telle réalité est triste, elle demeure compréhensible. Tant gais et lesbiennes que non gai-es, nous avons tous été imprégnés durant notre enfance et notre première éducation par une culture où les symboles, les images, les dire et le non-dit, les moeurs et les lois, les valeurs et la morale sont fortement hétérosexistes...  Conclusion : une note d'espoir pour l'avenir: Je conclurai par une note d'espoir. Si les gais de ma génération ont vu leur enfance et leur adolescence puiser à la source d'une culture répressive de leur nature profonde, il y a espoir que les jeunes d'aujourd'hui connaissent une vieillesse qui comportera moins de risques de détérioration d'eux-mêmes. Je prends cet espoir dans des données que j'ai recueillies auprès d'une centaine d'universitaires des sciences humaines dont la très forte majorité a entre dix-neuf et trente an. À l'énoncé qui dit L'orientation affective et sexuelle des gais et des lesbiennes est une des expressions naturelles de la sexualité, plus de 90 % sont fortement ou totalement d'accord. C'est le fondement le plus sûr de la santé mentale des générations à venir si nous mettons nos efforts à édifier une société où tout être humain sera traité avec équité et dignité. Plus une personne vit en conformité avec sa nature profonde, plus elle est aux yeux des autres ce qu'elle veut être à ses propres yeux, plus elle a de chance de rester en santé mentale, de vivre une vieillesse sereine et adaptée socialement et de mourir peut-être avec le sentiment que les parcelles de qualité de vie qu'elle a connues sont le reflet du bonheur qui l'attend derrière la tenture qui cache l'entrée du château splendide qu'est la mort et qu'elle est invitée à visiter.

Quebec spends $500,000 to help gay seniors (2009): Gai Écoute will receive $400,000 over four years to produce an education campaign for people who work with the elderly that will include a website and an information kit. The Quebec Lesbian Network will receive $120,000 over three years to broadcast a film that portrays the lives of six lesbians in their golden age. Diane Heffernan, director of the network, spoke about the resistance she faced when she approached old age homes about airing the film.
- Plus d'un demi-million de dollars pour le bien-être des aînés gais et lesbiennes (2008, Translation, Quebec): En 2008, lors de la commission des aînés qui s’est tenue à Montréal, tant Gai Écoute que le Réseau des lesbiennes du Québec exprimaient dans leurs mémoires respectifs que, par peur de l'ostracisme ou du harcèlement, les aînés vivant en résidences pour personnes âgées cachent leur homosexualité, ce qui fait d'eux une population vulnérable à l'isolement... Pour répondre à cette préoccupation présentée par les deux organismes communautaires, la ministre responsable des Aînés, Marguerite Blais, a annoncé, le 10 mai dernier, le versement de deux enveloppes destinées à la promotion des projets de sensibilisation du personnel soignant à la réalité des aînés homosexuels. - Quebec unveils guide to care of gay elderly people (2011): "A first generation of openly homosexual persons is reaching old age and does not wish to go back in the closet," said Laurent McCutcheon, president of Fondation Emergence, an advocacy group that developed the programme with the Quebec government. "With the programme... we want to support people who are in close contact with the elderly in their desire to respect differences and to give them the tools favouring the inclusion of everyone, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity." 

La Fondation Émergence (Translation, Quebec): Le Programme (Translation): "Pour que vieillir soit gai": Un programme novateur.
La maison urbaine: Une résidence au masculin, pour que vieillir soit gai (2008, Translation, Quebec): Le concept derrière la Maison Urbaine n’est pas de créer un ghetto, mais plutôt un cadre de vie sain et accueillant pour les hommes gais âgés qui préfèrent un environnement urbain près de leur communauté. Beaucoup d’homosexuels du troisième âge sont isolés, car ils n'ont pas d'enfants. La Maison Urbaine viendra faciliter la création – ou le prolongement – d’un réseau social de voisinage, si essentiel en vieillissant. - Le Centre SAGE à New York: Contre l'isolement social vécu par beaucoup de retraités LGBT (2012, Translation): La ville de New York vient d'ouvrir un centre social pour homosexuels âgés, le premier des États-Unis, dans le but d'aider une population souvent plus seule et isolée dans son grand âge... Le Centre SAGE a été inauguré le 1er mars dernier dans le quartier de Chelsea, au coeur de Manhattan, après un accord entre la mairie et l'organisation du même nom, qui se consacre à améliorer les conditions de vie des homosexuels retraités. Ce n'est pas une maison de retraite, ni un établissement médical spécialisé, mais un lieu de rencontres et de détente pour les plus de 60 ans. «Nous pensons que c'est le premier centre de ce type qui fonctionne à plein temps pour lesbiennes, gais, bisexuels et transsexuels», explique Christopher Miller, porte-parole du département du troisième âge de la ville de New York.

Debat sur Fr. Soc. Homosexualite: l'agisme (1999, Translation, France). - Georgette et Lucienne, ensemble depuis 37 ans (2001, Translation, Quebec): Elles demeurent dans le quartier Rosemont depuis 1968, pratiquement à la même adresse, ayant eu la chance de descendre du troisième au deuxième étage, il y a 11 ans. " Une chance, parce que Lucienne est malade : diabète, asthme, elle est pris du coeur, elle est fatiguée", me dit Georgette avec compassion.   Stables, prévisibles, prévoyantes, elles vivent leur homosexualité dans le secret, l'anonymat et l'invisibilité. "Nous avons dit à nos amies que vous étiez une cousine", me dit Lucienne, non sans une certaine complicité.  - Association des Personnes Retraités Gaies. - La vieillesse rose: une réalité peu visible (2001, Translation, Quebec, Alternate Link): Cependant, l'arrivée à la retraite d'un nombre sans précédent d'hommes et de femmes d'orientation homosexuelle aura également un impact très grand, du simple fait qu'ils sont ouvertement gais. - Retraité... et gai! (2001, Translation) "Cela amène d'autres questions: quels sont les besoins des gais et des lesbiennes âgés et en quoi diffèrent-ils de ceux des hétéros?" - Mythes et réalités (2001, Translation, Quebec): En effet, puisque les études sur le vieillissement ne parlent presque jamais des gais et lesbiennes âgés, on pourrait croire que l'homosexualité n'existe pas chez les personnes âgées. Jusqu'à présent ils sont d'ailleurs ignorés par les chercheurs en gérontologie et les intervenants en santé mentale. Alors, que connaissons-nous des lesbiennes et des gais âgés? Pas grand chose. Les quelques études sur le sujet sont surtout qualitatives, américaines pour la plupart, et leur échantillon est composé principalement d'hommes blancs, issus de la classe moyenne, scolarisés, vivant en milieu urbain et fréquentant la communauté gaie; donc elles ne seront pas nécessairement représentatives de la communauté gaie et lesbienne dans toute sa diversité.

Les besoins des aînés roses (2001, Translation, Quebec): deux chercheurs de l'École de travail social de l'Université McGill, Bill Ryan et Shary Brotnam, viennent de mettre en marche  non pas une, mais deux études qualitatives qui s'étaleront sur trois ans et qui visent à recueillir de l'information à propos des expériences, premièrement, des aînés gais et lesbiennes et, deuxièmement, de celles des aidant(e)s qui les entourent." - Jeunes contre vieux? (2001, Translation, Quebec): "À 60 ans, j'ai réfléchi sur le traitement que notre communauté infligeait à ses personnes âgées et je me suis demandé pourquoi nos besoins demeurent autant ignorés par nos semblables. Si des  individus aux cheveux blancs ne sont pas acceptés et honorés par le milieu gai, comment la majorité hétérosexuelle serait-elle incitée à accepter que de  vieux couples gais âgés puissent vivre heureux ensemble?' soutient-elle." - Vieillesse et Homosexualité: (2000, Translation): Il me semble que le monde gai en général est non seulement oublieux des anciens, mais aussi carrément hostile. Il me semble bien paradoxal que la génération qui a lutté pour l'abolition des
lois sur l'homosexualité se trouve remise au placard par ceux-là même qu'elle a contribué à libérer. Je me demande franchement s'il ne serait pas temps de créer une association de "panthères grises gaies", qui réclament leur juste place sur la scène gaie.

Vieillir n'est pas un péché.... (2000, Translation): Vieillir est tabou pour les gais. On se cache pour vieillir quand on est privé de panache, de gloire ou de fortune. Vieillir est violemment tabou dans le milieu homosexuel masculin où le paraître impose une fixation physique et la répétition du même mode de vie. Comme si le temps générait à l'infini d'éternels jeunes hommes, sans enfance, sans vieillissement ! J'ai essayé maintes et maintes fois d'en discuter dans des groupes gais de notre condition, et la réponse était toujours la même : « Vieille sacoche, arrête de te prendre pour un autre, et va jouer ailleurs »... N'est-ce pas une grâce que de pouvoir vieillir ? N'est-ce pas un sort que l'on partage avec tous ? Mais est-il nécessaire de créer nous-mêmes cette terrible exclusion interne ? - Apprendre et comprendre pour vieillir heureux: Le vieillissement n'est pas une défaite (2002, Translation): On peut cesser de vivre, de croître, bien avant d'être vieux. Les gyms, les hormones de jeunesse ne sont que des illusions que le miroir détruit à la première occasion. À moins d'accepter l'inévitable, l'âme peut mourir bien avant le corps.

La personne âgée et la sexualité (2003, Translation, France, but information is mostly American):  Homosexualité et vieillissement: Il semble que, même si très peu de personnes âgées se disent homosexuelles, une proportion importante d'entre elles a déjà eu des expériences à caractère homosexuel.     Parmi les croyances populaires entourant la sexualité et le vieillissement, on trouve celle voulant que les homosexuels âgés soient seuls et inadaptés. Cette croyance concerne particulièrement les homosexuels masculins âgés (Kimmel, 1980). Selon Kelly (1977), ce n'est pas l'homosexualité qui est à l'origine des difficultés d'adaptation à la vieillesse, mais plutôt la stigmatisation de cette orientation sexuelle par la société. En effet, l'attitude négative de la société à l'égard de l'homosexualité peut se traduire de différentes façons qui sont susceptibles de nuire aux homosexuels âgés (Teitelman, 1987) : les hôpitaux et les unités de soins de longue durée n'accordent pas toujours de droits de visite au partenaire homosexuel;   les polices d'assurance-vie peuvent interdire qu'un partenaire homosexuel désigné comme bénéficiaire;  les membres de la famille d'un défunt peuvent s'opposer à ce que l'héritage aille à son partenaire homosexuel;   les homosexuels n'ont pas la même approbation sociale que les hétérosexuels pour dénoncer ouvertement leur deuil lors du décès de leur partenaire. Malgré les difficultés que rencontrent les homosexuels âgés, il ne semble pas que ces derniers présentent de problèmes d'adaptation particuliers. Les variables reliées à une bonne adaptation psychologique dans cette population sont l'intégration dans la communauté homosexuelle, l'engagement envers l'orientation homosexuelle, une faible préoccupation concernant la dissimulation de cette orientation, une relation amoureuse exclusive en cours et une satisfaction sexuelle élevée (Berger, 1980). En ce qui concerne les lesbiennes âgées, Deevey (1990) a observé que les 78 répondantes âgées qu'elle a interviewées présentaient une bonne santé mentale. Elles ont également plus de chance de trouver une partenaire à un âge avancé en raison de la plus grande proportion de femme âgées.

Maisons de retraite pour homos: et en France? (2010, Translation):Les maisons de retraite pour gays et lesbiennes font de plus en plus parler d'elles. Un concept déjà bien installé à l'étranger, et notamment aux États-Unis depuis 2002, en Suisse, aux Pays-Bas, en Allemagne et dernièrement en Espagne. En France, des projets ont commencé à faire surface en 2004 mais depuis, rien n'a évolué. Les avis divergent toujours entre "ghettoïsation" et reconnaissance d'une communauté dans la vieillesse. À l'occasion du débat sur les retraites, Yagg s'est intéressé à la situation en France en essayant de savoir si des maisons de retraite pour homos sont prévues et en interrogeant les acteurs concernés... - Maison de retraite « gay friendly » : la France en retard sur les autres pays (2011, Translation). - Vieillir gay après l’activité professionnelle : comment voyez-vous cette existence senior ? (2012, Translation): L’association L’Autre Cercle vient de lancer un sondage intitulé « Vieillir gay après l’activité professionnelle ». L’objectif de ce sondage est de savoir comment les personnes homosexuel-e-s, bi, trans se voient en tant que futurs seniors ? Quelles sont leurs préoccupations et qu’attendent-elles des associations ou des pouvoirs public ?

Age et LGBT : vieillir et accueillir sans discrimination (2013, Translation):  A l’occasion de la journée internationale de lutte contre l’homophobie et la transphobie, Michèle Delaunay, ministre déléguée chargée des Personnes âgées et de l’autonomie était à l’initiative d’une table ronde "Age et LGBT : vieillir et accueillir sans discrimination". Théau Brigand y était pour Seronet. Cette table ronde, "Age et LGBT : vieillir et accueillir sans discrimination", c’est la conjugaison de deux combats de la ministre, son travail sur l’âge qu’elle assume à plein temps depuis qu’elle est ministre, mais aussi une forme de continuation de son investissement sur les questions des droits des LGBT. Parlementaire, Michèle Delaunay avait été à l’initiative d’une proposition de loi sur le changement d’état civil pour les personnes trans... C’est Sébastien Lifshtiz, réalisateur du film "Les invisibles", qui ouvre le jeu. "Les invisibles", sorti fin 2012, c’est ce film portrait de personnes gays et lesbiennes âgées, sur leur vie, leur histoire, leur(s) amour(s), hier et aujourd’hui. Loin de tout misérabilisme, le film casse l’idée d’une vie de souffrance et de discriminations, montre les combats, la joie et l’épanouissement qui a aussi été, qui est encore aujourd’hui. Le film garde une mémoire, une trace de ces vies, des témoignages qui dépassent des représentations si sombres.

Les bonnes soeurs ne veulent pas de gays dans leur foyer (2013, Translation, Germany): Une maison de retraite allemande a sèchement rejeté la demande d'un homme pour son partenaire depuis 48 ans, gravement malade... La mésaventure, racontée par le quotidien «TZ» (repris par Queer.de), a mis en colère un conseiller municipal du parti gay Liste rose. «Il y a toujours eu des problèmes avec les homes, note Thomas Niederbühl, mais je n’avais jamais entendu parler d’un rejet aussi brutal.» Créé il y a 153 ans, l’établissement est censé être laïc depuis 1990. Mais il dépend toujours de nonnes franciscaines. Sur son site, la fondation prétend «se préoccuper, apprécier et encourager la personnalité de tous ses résidents». Pour Karl, épuisé par les soins prodigué à son ami depuis des mois, ce rejet est un rappel cruel de l’époque où l’homosexualité était illégale en Allemagne, en vertu de l’article 175 du Code pénal. Dans les années 1960, notamment, le couple avait eu les plus grandes difficultés à trouver un appartement.

Maisons de retraite: les homos débarquent! (2011, Translation, Switzerland): La première génération de gays et de lesbiennes qui a osé faire son coming out arrive à l'automne de sa vie. Enquête sur les préoccupations de ces retraités qui peinent à se faire entendre... A leur entrée en EMS, les homosexuels ont le choix entre afficher leurs préférences et risquer la méfiance voire l’hostilité, ou se taire. Coming out ou placard, les avis sont partagés. Certains en ont assez de devoir «dire qu’on est gay pour tout et n’importe quoi. On ne va quand même pas faire notre coming out tous les jours!» ... Le tableau n’est pas rose. Passer sa retraite dans un EMS gay friendly, voire réservé aux gays, est-ce une solution? «Ce qu’il faudrait, c’est une fondation dirigée par des femmes intéressées par des projets innovants concernant les lesbiennes qui vieillissent comme tout le monde et qui aient les moyens de les mener à bien», dit-elle. Pour l’instant, la société n’en est qu’au stade d’imaginer des formes de vie commune entre familles et personnes âgées. Il est probable que les homosexuels devront encore attendre. Et avoir du personnel gay en EMS? «Les employés risquent des problèmes s’ils affichent leur orientation sexuelle», objecte Eliane Blanc. - Homos sweet homes (2000, Translation, Switzerland): A Zurich, un projet de maison de retraite réservée exclusivement aux gays est à l’étude. Vision d’horreur ou refuge enchanteur? ... Ce qui semblait être un projet farfelu au début des années 80 s’est depuis longtemps concrétisé dans divers pays. En Suisse, plusieurs projets de maisons de retraite pour homosexuels sont à l’étude, dont un en ville de Zurich (pour hommes). Or, s’il y a bien une chose taboue dans le milieu, c’est la vieillesse. Epris d’hédonisme et adeptes du culte de l’apparence, bon nombre de gays refusent de se projeter dans un avenir fait de dépendance, de couches-culottes et de bouillies de carottes. Faire admettre aux gays que leur vie ne se résumera pas seulement en libations et festoiements n’est pas chose facile. Se pose donc une question: que va-t-il nous arriver lorsque, rhumatisants, nous ne pourrons plus manipuler nos fioles de poppers? Miracle de la subdivision de la société moderne, un nouveau choix se profile: aux maisons de retraite «classiques», les homosexuels pourront, dans un proche avenir, opter pour celles qui leur seront exclusivement réservées.

Paredes, Benoît (2010). Vieillir gai à Montréal et au Québec : une analyse sociopolitique de l’aînesse homosexuelle. Mémoire [dissertation], Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal. Download Page. PDF Download. Ce mémoire a pour objectif de rendre compte de l’aînesse homosexuelle à Montréal, et dans une certaine mesure au Québec, comme l’émergence d’une nouvelle identité sexuelle. Il s’attache en quelque sorte à retracer la généalogie d’un développement récent du dispositif de sexualité (Foucault,1976) dans lequel s’élaborent de nouvelles procédures de pouvoir autour de l’homosexualité ainée. Nous entendons ici la notion d’identité homosexuelle comme gouvernement libéral de son propre corps, au sens d’une expression individuelle vécue sur un mode identitaire différencié par des pratiques homosexuelles. A travers le programme Pour que vieillir soit gai développé et conduit par la Fondation Émergence, il est possible d’observer les dynamiques sociopolitiques à l’oeuvre qui médiatisent la question ainée gaie2 autour d’une institutionnalisation nouvelle et d’une mobilisation générationnelle que nous nous proposons d’analyser. C’est ce souci de soi autour d’une conception réaménagée de l’ainesse3 qui retient notre attention.

Vieillir est encore perçu comme négatif (2002, Translation, Quebec): "En effet, même si cela ne correspond pas nécessairement à la réalité, les gais âgés sont souvent perçus comme étant déprimés, seuls, rejetés de leur famille, repoussés par les jeunes gais qui les trouvent dégoûtants." - Peu de groupes gais pour les vieux (2002, Translation, Quebec): La situation des gais et lesbiennes retraités du Québec n'est pas bien différente de celle de leurs voisins du sud. Aux États-Unis, seuls quelques organismes communautaires gais offrent des services adaptés à leurs aînés et depuis peu. Plus surprenant encore, dans la patrie du lobbying, il n'existe aucune organisation ou lobby mandaté pour représenter les intérêts des gais et lesbiennes âgés.  - Ce qui nous distingue des hétéros (2002, Translation, Quebec): "Retour dans la garde-robe? "Premièrement, comment trouverons-nous à nous loger si nous ne sommes  pas accepter par les communautés de retraités traditionnelles? ...Ainsi au moment où nous faisons face au vieillissement ensemble, nous ne devrions pas trop considérer "l'âge d'or" comme une période déprimante, mais plutôt nous y préparer. Et bien que la communauté gaie tout entière ait un long chemin à parcourir, il existe des gens éclairés qui se préoccupent de notre vieillesse. Donnons-leur un coup de main!"

Peu de gens savaient que Charles Trenet était homosexuel. Adieu à un excellent membre de notre communauté! (2001, Translation) Dans ses chansons, à part la joie de vivre légendaire du chanteur, on pouvait parfois deviner sa tristesse de vieillir dans un monde homosexuel oô l'amour est lié à la jeunesse. Il aura écrit autant sur le désir d'affection que sur le triste passage des années... Dans une entrevue qu'il accordait en 1999, Trenet, encore en grande forme malgré ses 85 ans, affirmait qu'il avait réglé le probléme du vieillissement en étant resté à l'âge de 19 ans dans sa tête. Il avait réussi à le croire toute sa vie, on dit qu'il est décédé sans regrets. Qui ne voudrait pas d'un ti-jeune de 19 ans? Personne... - "Entretien" avec Joseph Hansen (1981, Translation): "Dave n'est pas un héros immuable, la création idéale et immortelle d'un auteur ; vous avez choisi de le faire vieillir et de rendre ce vieillissement sensible..." 

Science et santé gaie et lesbienne (2001, Translation): "Les thèmes discutés pour ce qui est des besoins spécifiques à la santé des hommes gais étaient : le suicide, les jeunes, l’adaptation des services sociaux et de santé pour les  hommes gais et vieillir gai... Sur le thème Vieillir gai, les participants dénoncent le peu de services disponibles actuellement à l’intention des hommes gais plus âgés. On a également souligné le manque de connaissances sur leurs besoins spécifiques en matière de santé. Par ailleurs, afin de sensibiliser les communautés à leurs besoins et à inciter les gais plus âgés à utiliser les services existants, les participants souhaitent des actions concrètes comme par exemple une campagne de marketing social sur le thème 'vieillir gai et en santé' ."



Other Countries

A home for transgender elderly in Indonesia (2013, Video): Indonesia's first home for transgender elderly people will soon be receiving government help. But discrimination, illness and poverty are still rife for the marginalised community. - World's first old people's home for the transgender (2013, YouTube): Traditionally elderly people in Indonesia are cared for their families but that's not the case for the countries more than three million strong transgender community. They are often rejected by their family who are ashamed of them. Many elderly transgenders who use to survive as prostitutes end up begging on the streets. But now perhaps the world's first old people's home for transgender is being built on the outskirts of the capital Jakarta. - World’s first home for transgender elderly (2013): As part of new moves towards acceptance, the government will in March begin supporting the home, which officially opened in November, with a basic nutrition programme while offering business seed money to 200 transgender residents in the city. However, most of the funds needed to support the home will continue to come from its founder, Yulianus Rettoblaut, a waria and prominent activist better-known as Mami Yuli, who turned her own house into the shelter last year. “We are focusing on elderly waria because NGOs usually focus on young ones,” the 51-year-old told AFP. She was inspired to take action after seeing many of her fellow ageing waria on the streets, ill, unemployed and forced to live in squalid conditions.

Elderly gay men shrug off guilt after life of denial (2013): Like the movie Beginners that tells a story about a straight son and his dying gay father, many adult children find it hard to accept a gay father who wants to do something about the feelings he had repressed for decades. Zhou Shengjian, director of a gay advocacy group in Chongqing, is trying to help... As gay and lesbian people age, they are entering into a kind of dangerous isolation. "What most of elderly gay men need is not money, but love and company," Zhou said. About 10 years ago, Zhou wanted to borrow the idea from the US to open up a nursing home for Chinese elderly gay men. It is like a "gay utopia" where elderly gay people can avoid social discrimination and pressure and get good care. Similar projects exist in Europe, especially Germany, where young and old gay people share communities. However, many elderly gay people also express concerns that they couldn't hide their sexuality any more if they moved into such a nursing home. The idea was soon abandoned as there was no official support and finances available.


To "The SEARCH Section" For The Best Search Engines & Information Directories, The Searchable Sites to Locate Papers & Abstracts... and The Sites - Some Searchable - Where "Free Papers" Are Available!
 

Stereotypes / Prejudice / Intergenerational Sex / Relationships (Mostly Male Issues)

Re-establishing our Elders to Their Rightful Place in Society (2000): "Shutting out the elderly is not only a problem in the lgbt community...Overall, I'm hoping that we come around to the notion that elderly individuals are essential for our mental and emotional well-being, and that we someday welcome their presence. If you agree, then for starters, when an older lgbt individual smiles at you as he or she is walking your way, smile back. We've rendered them invisible, and it's our job to restore them to their honorable place as our mentors and friends." - Gay Men and Aging. - Gay seniors' home (2002): Gay men and women flock to San Francisco for its progressive lifestyle, tolerant people and flourishing gay community. But when it comes time to retire, many gay seniors say San Francisco lets them loose from its warm embrace. The Bay Area is so expensive that many gay seniors have to move elsewhere and suddenly find themselves snubbed and even hated outside the city's unique sphere of tolerance. Retirement homes can be even more hostile, according to gay seniors and their advocates. Many nursing-home residents who grew up when homosexuality was considered a crime and a mental illness still look down on gay and lesbian peers. Some staff members reject and mistreat them, gay seniors say.

Elderly gays and lesbians say they encounter some old prejudices (2003):  Elderly gay and lesbian people in Massachusetts are calling for publicly subsidised housing to be built specifically for them, saying they face homophobia and are often forced to go back into the closet when they move into traditional old people's homes and nursing homes. A report released this week by a consortium of advocates for the elderly, gays and lesbians says men and women who came out in the 1970s and 1980s are finding themselves increasingly dependent and fearful of revealing their sexual identity. - Challenging Ageism [in the gay community] (2001): Gay people have the same ageist assumptions as the rest of America, but our attitudes are especially pernicious to our elders. It's bad enough that gay seniors are unwelcome in the mainstream population, but it's doubly worse that they're shunned by "their own." By isolating and stereotyping our seniors, we deprive them   of invaluable allies in their struggles for recognition and dignified treatment.

Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual elders are a strength within our community (2002): "Lesbian, gay, and bisexual elders are a strength within our community yet there are few, if any, positive images that accurately reflect their lives." - Old People are Gay Community's Most Feared Subgroup N/A: "I’d add another reason to the list of why older gay men and lesbians are so absent from our culture: If we are honest, getting old is dreaded by just about all of us. I’d even go as far to say that older gays are the most feared subgroup within gay America. That’s why we’ve collectively made them more  invisible than any other subgroup I can think of."

Prejudice (1997): "Twink. Femme. Troll. Butch. What do these words have in common? They are all disparaging slurs used against different members of the gay community. The frightening part is that they are uttered by fellow members of the gay community. We don't like each other. Gay men and lesbians don't mingle, and everybody trashes drag queens. Bisexual people are looked down upon by those who are strictly gay. The sweater types find the leather types revolting. "Lipstick lesbian" is a criticism... People complain that the young gay men ignore and despise the older gay men, but the older gay men are all after the 18 year-olds. How can we expect the 18 year-olds to want older men when the older men don't even want older men?

Gays on Grindr are ageist? No Shit (2013): I find the sheer volume of gays with phrases like "NO ONE OVER 30" on their profile to be astonishing. I know I touched on this at the start of the year with my 'Something the gays should remember' post but it's been bothering me more and more and I thought it warranted fleshing out which is why I did the experiment. I understand and respect that people have preferences, I sure as hell do. I'd just not be so harsh as to broadcast them on a place like Grindr and risk making someone feel bad, or inadequate. My only ask is that I know who I'm talking to and that doesn't belittle anyone. Then again maybe I think that I'm expecting too much from what is essentially, a hook-up app. If there are nice people that are worth getting to know I'm probably not going to find them on an app designed around blowing your load with the least amount of effort as possible!

A Letter to an Ageist (2012): I was going through online profiles one day and came across one written by a 27 year old gay man. It read in part (the italics are mine): “Looking for guys in their 20′s…. will consider guys in their 30′s… but don’t bother if you are over the age of 45 because you are already dead.” Charming. I debated if I wanted to take the time to respond to him but decided to hold off. Basically all he’s saying is that he is most interested in guys around his own age and there is certainly nothing wrong with that. We all have our preferences and choices in the men that we seek. But it was the nastiness of his decision to add on that additional dig that being over the age of 45 was considered “…already dead” that stuck in my craw. Well, today I’ve mustered up a sufficient amount of cranky to write the response I would have liked to have sent. So…

Daddy/Son and gay ageism (2012): So I’ve noticed on the gay websites(of that there are plenty) a number of older men exploring their generous nature. It bothered me as a young gay man as I wasn’t looking for a replacement father or sugar daddy. I wanted to be understood and loved and I felt the experience of someone older would assist me in getting just that. Not only would I have their experience in the bedroom but I would be able to learn how to be comfortable with being a gay man, and how to handle the judgments and hatred from those closed-minded individuals, again from those who have lived it longer than I. What I’ve noticed is the need for the elder gays to buy attention. I’ve noticed younger men playing to the crowd and accepting gifts. I’ve noticed a whole culture that does nothing unless it’s for some kind of gain; money, cars, furs, and trips.  That our culture give gay for pay a whole other meaning.

Age before beauty (2000): "I was standing in a bar somewhere, probably the Barn on a Wednesday night. You know, where all the younger guys hang out? Anyway, there I was and these two kids walked by (at my age, anyone under 30 is a "kid") and I heard one of them say, 'If I ever got that old, I'd kill myself.' ...The first is that gays are obsessed with youth in a way that straights aren't... I remember taking solitary walks in the twilight when I was 11, and crying. Why? Because I never wanted to become a homosexual. I made a promise to myself that I would never turn into a lonely, aging fag. I had a clear image of a rented room, a single lightbulb, a crust of bread and me -- alone, poor and in the dark. "- Going Gray Gayfully (2000): As the elasticity evaporates from our skin and that youthful glow gives way to deep lines, we’re each reminded that there’s no real way to avoid getting older. But until recently, being an elderly lesbian could have meant going back into the closet as you entered a nursing home or a retirement community that didn’t understand you--or at least being isolated because there were no resources to serve you. People are finally beginning to realize, however, that older lesbians--and older gay men, for that matter--need special services geared just for them. Web sites, conferences, newspapers and even retirement communities geared toward older lesbians are springing up everywhere. Coverage of this rapidly organizing sub-group within the gay and lesbian community has even seeped into the mainstream media. Lesbian and gay retirement communities have gotten big spreads in the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times. And when New York City’s Pride Senior Network, a nonprofit advocacy group for older lesbians and gays, decided to start publishing a newspaper called The Networker, it got the attention of the Associated Press.

Challenging Facts: Are There Enough of Us to Take Care of Each Other? (2000): Like the larger population, the senior lesbian and gay community is growing rapidly as a function of the influx of aging lgbt boomers and longer life expectancies. Gays and lesbians must assume the role of caregiver in order to provide the support needed for their senior community to age successfully. Several factors work against this happening:  1. our community has limited access to traditional family members as a resource for caregiving;  2. we are denied the financial support and incentives provided by government support strategies for caregiving; and  3.  massive numbers of gay men who have died from AIDS markedly reduce the number of caregivers that might be otherwise available.  Lastly, pervasive ageism in the lgbt society often seems extreme, especially in the gay male environs. The "disposability" of anyone over the age of 40, let alone seniors, is a prevalent attitude. This attitude works against expecting caregivers for our seniors to arise from the ranks of younger lgbts. Yet one remains optimistic that the lgbt community will rise to the challenge. It happened before! - Who Will Take Care of Us When We're Old? N/A

Ageism: Age Before Rage: (2000, QT Speaks with John Alan Lee, retired Sociology Professor and author of Getting Sex) "In a culture that celebrates youth and beauty, what happens to gay men when they grow old? Tips from a bestselling author on how to age and cruise with dignity...Where does the negative stereotype about being old and gay, come from in our culture?.. In particular, gay people are less valued, because the gay culture puts a tremendous emphasis on physical surfaces and beauty - everything from hair styles to clothing styles. And that includes the youthful appearance, the smooth skin, the high energy... What a fiasco! I try to do this story about how fags spend so much time trying look good and stay young, and I end up with this tale of how the gay seniors are ignored by youth culture. All I have to say is, I hope I die before I get old. Well not really. I mean, now I'm 30..."

Aging gracefully and gayfully (2001): Homophobia is not the only challenge we have had to face as older lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender adults. In addition, ageism contributes to our isolation. The combination of fearing judgment or discrimination because of our sexual orientation and fearing rejection by the gay community because of our age makes it difficult for many of us to seek the support that we may need as we grow older and to participate in many social opportunities... We are addressing those fears with Community Connections. Community Connections is a program offered by Spectrum Center for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Concerns for the North Bay's older GLBT adults.

Creating a New Gay Culture: Balancing Fidelity & Freedom  (G. Rotello) (1997): "One result is the cult of the gym. A much less healthy response is the fear that some gay men report when they contemplate growing older, sometimes resulting in a subconscious feeling that they might as well live fast and die young. What is so ironic about this is that it does not conform with what many older gay men report about their lives. Many researchers argue that older gay men tend to be happier and better adjusted than their heterosexual peers, largely because they have spent their lives learning how to be self-sufficient. But the vibrancy of gay seniors is one of the gay community's best-kept secrets -- even from itself."

Edmund White Interview (2000): "Maybe that French discretion and sexual sophistication I mentioned earlier rubbed off on my expatriate, Austin. I think that older gay men are rejected by the ordinary gay community, if not as friends at least as partners, so older men (like Austin, or me) learn to look for love in strange places, and not demand that things be ideal." - Edmund White Interview #2 (1997, Interview # 1): Several doctors have said to me that the biggest problem is convincing young people that there is life after 40. If you say you're going to be dead by 40, they say, 'So what? There's no gay life after 40, anyway.' Especially in France, but even here. You can easily be a gay in his 20s and never meet a gay over 40 because you don't see them in the bars. They don't go out, they're not part of your world, and if you do see them, you consider them pathetic."

Last Ones to the Party (1996) by (the late) Marvin Liebman: "The advances made by the lesbian and gay community in the past twenty-five years - and the resistance it has encountered in the political arena - have made it both easier and more urgent for people of all ages to affirm their sexualities. In so doing, the older folks are desperate to make up for their lost years in the closet. They want to begin to become part of our community - not so much in the bars and dance halls where they are unwelcome, and certainly not hitting on young men or women with the assurance of rejection. But, they are desperate to participate and take a stand with their brothers and sisters  and to do it together with them. Those of us interested in a truly inclusive lesbian and gay community need to think about how hospitable whatever their own part of that community really is. Older gays and lesbians are ready to come out. Each of must create a way of welcoming and nurturing and loving the older people in our midst. They can learn from the young people, and the younger members of our community can certainly learn from them. Over recent years, there has been a lot of talk about "outing" homosexuals, and many have been "outed". Let us give those who come out voluntarily a place to come out to.

Forever Young (2000): "The age of 40 is often looked at as a turning point in people's lives. To some, it's an age that kind of signals an end to youth. Well, the truth of the matter is that 40 is indeed a turning point-but a positive turning point. At least that is what Francisco Negrete, a 39-year-old gay Chicano from Los Angeles, believes. He's looking forward to turning the big 4-0 with great anticipation... What's it like to come out so late in life? Frank says that there are certainly some challenges-one of the biggest of which is finding other gay Latinos his same age. There are few places that he knows of (other than the clubs and the general gay Latino scene) where he can go to meet other men his age. Sometimes, it's frustrating for him to realize that he's "too old" to be able to attend events being held for younger gay Latinos.... Another observation Frank has made about people his age is that most of them are HIV positive. He says, "Of the men that I do know who are over 30, probably more than half have this disease."

Aging Disgracefully: The Problem With Older Gay Men (Part 1) (2002): "Older gay men and younger gay men rarely talk to each other... I went through my entire twenties without a single friendship with an older man. I felt manipulated by them.  There were only two kinds of older men, as far as I was concerned: Those who made a pass at you and those who didn’t... Now that I’m over 40, I’ve had to come face to face with my own questionable behavior with younger guys... (Part 2) There are plenty of young guys who want the sexual company of older men. But the majority don't. What they  want is friendship, guidance, advice and support. And too often, men like me use these potential gifts as a lure for sexual conquest. In gay life, the line between sex and friendship is thin, transparent and constantly moving... There is always something wrong when you sacrifice friendship for momentary pleasure. There is always something wrong with using experience and power to exploit youth and vulnerability. I had a responsibility to redefine what it means to be an older gay man and I failed miserably." - Older men, younger boys, or visa versa? (Alternate Link)"The old stereotypes of Dirty Old Man  and Exploited Youth are fast being done  away with. Here's a hard, critical look at gay intergenerational relationships.everybody knows that some older guys chase after young men. But these days, a surprising number of younger guys - of legal age ofcourse - are lusting after older - and sometimes much older - men." - The Experienced World of Young Gay Men who are Attracted to Older Men - A Phenomenological Study. (1999, Alternate link with link to complete study in Finnish.)

Gay Kids in the Real World (1997, by Steve Silberman):  "Almost every one of the boys I interviewed for my article informed me that they were regularly propositioned by older men on AOL. At first, when I asked them what they thought of that, they'd wrinkle up their noses and say things like, "Gross."  Then, often, later in the conversation, if the trust level got high enough, a teenager might admit to me that he himself had met an older boy or man online, and saw him in real life. Sometimes the two became friends. Sometimes they had sex. Sometimes meeting offline had turned out to be an uncomfortable experience, but sometimes the young man perceived it in a positive light - an introduction to a larger circle of friends, or an entree to the wider gay world. For some of these highly intelligent, articulate young men, an offline rendezvous with an older male was a risk that had turned out to be worth it... The truth is, gay teenagers and older gay men have always found ways to meet, despite every law against it. Those interactions, fraught with risk on every side, comprise a kind of initiatory process for young gay men..."

Gay City crosses The Great Age Divide in public forum (1999): "The forum revealed how often Gay men make mistaken assumptions about each other, based on our own life experiences, misinterpreting the  intentions and behaviors of other Gay men older or younger than ourselves. The discussions revealed how we often mistakenly project our own personal assumptions and stereotypes onto one another, and fail to understand the experiences of Gay men  from another generation... Gay City forum "The Great Age Divide" didn't solve the problem of intergenerational misunderstanding and conflict, or answer the questions of where we go from here... Generalizing from the trend of the comments from the audience, younger Gay men tended to view older Gay men as bitter, angry, frightened of their sexuality, and sexually exploitative of younger Gay men... On the other hand, older Gay men tended to view the younger generation of Gay men as reckless,  misinformed, superficial, sometimes cruel, and sexually exploitative... Many people expressed the desire of a Gay community where we relate to one another not as sex objects, but find some deeper ground for encountering and enjoying each other, while some folk felt that sexual objectification of Gay men was entirely appropriate and to be expected."

Young Man, Older Man: Why Intergenerational Love Works (2011): Often in the gay world, there appears to be even less acceptance and more catty criticism about such age-differing partnerships. The daddy-son complex is often mentioned. Chicken hawk, cradle robber, gold digger and grave digger are just some of the terms we use for predators young-on-old and vice-versa. But where are we -- or maybe, where should we be -- in terms of accepting that sometimes, birds of a feather don’t flock together, that like doesn’t always choose like? What if -- gasp! -- some older men and younger really do make a go of it...  Paul White also publishes a website, his called Gray Gay. It’s a place for mature gay men and their admirers. He categorizes an intergenerational relationship as "more than 25 years apart in age, since that is accepted cycle of each generation."  "I realized I was attracted to older men when I was a teenager," he relates. "I met my first partner when I was 22. He was 55 and we were together for around 18 years, but gradually the nature of our relationship changed, as I wanted to live together and he didn’t." British-born White is now 53 and living with his current partner in Australia, whom he met 16 years ago and is 79 years old.  "I knew I was gay and I knew I only liked older men, but I found it impossible to find positive impressions of such relationships," White complains. "I am firmly of the opinion that any successful relationship requires that you to have a common interest that you share, as well as allowing for your differences."  As for his opinion on age of consent, "Certainly I knew physically I was attracted to older men at the age of 14, but I am not so sure I could have dealt with it emotionally unlike I had my first experience at 18."

Young Man, Older Man: Why Intergenerational Love Works (2011): "The most important period in gay history where intergenerational relationships were concerned was undoubtedly in Germany during the early homosexual movement, before identity politics ran amok as it has in the American gay movement for the past couple of decades," he says. "No such flowering of boy-love, or pederastic groups or publications has occurred anywhere else in comparison to the first decades of the twentieth century in Germany." The subject of how low the age of consent should be is a contentious issue. Most gay rights group consider it toxic...  Most people automatically relegate any relationship with legal minors as out of bounds. But there are others -- not only the old, but the younger partner -- who consider such boundaries artificial. Whether these fall within the boundaries of acceptable behavior or not, the fact remains that younger men are often attracted to older ones; sometimes, they’re much older. Intergenerational relationships will remains for the foreseeable the stuff of snide innuendo if not outright illegality. But for those inside those relationships, what works, works.

Intergeneration Issues For Gay Asian Males: The Truth About GAM (2001): "The pursuit of a white boyfriend is so intense that many gay Asian men would sooner date a much older white male partner than another Asian.  Asian and Friends and the Long Yang Club are both social organizations with numerous chapters around the world that are designed for Asian men to meet Caucasian partners.  I had attended some of their events in cities from Sydney to New York, and all I saw were 50-something white guys with their 20-something Asian boyfriends." - Gay Asian Pride (2001): "Based on my personal experience and talking to friends, I have found that most "Asian admirers" (or "Rice Queens" as they are known in the community) are always older than their Asian "boyfriends." ...While perusing the gay bookstore, I noticed a porn magazine with only Asian male models. However, unlike Caucasian porn magazines, these Asian men obviously appeared to be in their teens with very effeminate bodies."

I Hate Older Men (2000): "As the post-Stonewall generation ages, many gay men are embracing the pederast within... Mainstream gay culture dresses up its kiddie porn in a pretense of serving teens... Not all boy chasers are predatory. Some use emotions as their bait, and offer the nurturance that the boy's parents neglected to provide. Sometimes this exchange is genuine, but often it's just another  technique. Sex is the point—and most deprived boys will provide it because it validates their existence." - Open Response Letter:  "The title of your article sets the tone, and your comment "After all, gay men want to be where the boys are" is really quite unfair. (It is especially unfair to older gay men who have been in years-long, monogamous relationships, the ranks of which you apparently wish to join. Yes, I did taste the irony at the end of your piece.) You see, from a reader's perspective, your article advances the stereotype of: "Older men who are well-to-do, and young men who aren't doing too well." I'm not saying that it doesn't happen, but it certainly represents a minor fraction of the gay population. You seem to be trying to make it the norm." - Related Commentary (2002). - Opinion: Not tolerating the intolerable (2001).

Lesbian Cougars (2008):  Lesbian cougars are more visible these days, largely because lesbians are more visible, but age-disparate relationships among women have “been going on forever,” says Savage Love sex columnist Dan Savage. “That is what Sappho was: an older lesbian attracted to a younger lesbian.” The lesbian cougar’s motivation is as age-old as the island of Lesbos itself: Being around younger women simply makes an older woman feel young. And, as Grace Moon, a 40-year-old adjunct professor in New York City and the managing editor of OurChart.com, says, “Being able to relate to someone in their 20s–and keeping a flexible attitude–is a healthy thing to do.” - Lesbian Cougars Now Have a Dating Site to Hunt for Cubs (2011):

Gay City’s Over 40’s project asks the tough questions: "The first question the panelists explored was,  'What are some of the changes that can be expected as Gay men move into their 40’s?' McKay, who just turned 60 this year, said that as he moved from his 40’s to 50’s he suffered from a fear of death, many sleepless nights, and was deeply depressed that his spiritual faith seemed to be failing him. "I was terrified of older men because of my own fear of growing old and dying," he recalled... The next question dealt with how younger Gay men often treat older Gay men: 'In our 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, we’re supposed to just go away. We’re not supposed to be at the sex clubs or bath houses. How do we approach these problems of the stereotypes that are  used against us?'"

Weston J, O'Connor P, Lockhart J (2007). Perspectives on Intergenerational Love. Gsy & Lesbian Review Worldwide, January 1, 2007. Full Text. Needed: A New Word for ‘Gerontophil’... Eager as I am to have a coinage of mine in the OED, or even a dictionary of slang—especially a dictionary of slang—I can’t seem to come up with the right word. Logically, Gerry is the right word, but it doesn’t seem to work. “Are you a gerry? A gerry-chaser?” I think not. Notice there is no gender involved, which is good, and no age, because there are old gerontophils. One place where it works is in combination with the word bar. The Gerrybar in New York is currently “Catarenas,” the Gerrybar in Chicago is “Gentry,” and the Gerrybar in L.A. is called “The Other Side.” I’m trying out a number of spelling variations—it’s my word, and I’ll spell it how I choose. Calling them Gerrybars is better that their usual names, either “The Wrinkle Room” or “God’s Waiting Room.” In London the mother house of all gerontophil bars is called “The City of Quebec,” but it’s known to its friends as “The Elephants’ Graveyard.” Australians call gerontophil bars “Old Geezer Bars,” which I find charming. ... Five Couples... INTERGENERATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS—those in which the two partners are at least twenty years apart—seem to thrive in the gay male world, greatly surpassing the corresponding rate of occurrence in the straight world. It’s a phenomenon that many people have noticed informally, though there isn’t much hard data to confirm its existence or its prevalence. Just why so many gay relationships feature a large age gap has also been the subject of speculation, with theories ranging from the psychological to the economic. My goal was simply to gather some data on five intergenerational couples that could help us understand how they live their lives. To this end, I located five couples in different parts of the U.S. and met with them in their homes, digitally recording their responses to my questions. While the discussion was open-ended, I followed a comprehensive questionnaire that asked them to talk about the circumstances of their meeting, their life together, their feelings about the relationship, their sexual relations, their interaction with family and friends, and so on. The interviews were conducted between February and June 2006... Eduardo, now 36, and Al, 69, are in the nineteenth year of their partnership...  Across the country, in Boston, Fred Mazyck, 27, and George Casper, 76, together five years, met on the Internet...  Casey Walters, 47, and Rowland Folonsbee, 81, together for 23 years, first met in Florida, where they both lived, and recently moved to Louisville, Kentucky...  Bob Carroll, 46, and Jerry LaBelle, 71, together for nineteen years, are also recent transplants, from Southern California to semi-rural Texas about forty miles northeast of Dallas...  Mike Miller, 52, and Carl Stevens, 71, met in a restaurant, didn’t see one another for two years, met again in the same restaurant, and have been partners for five years.

Ronald Nyein Zaw Tan: DEFIANCE: Defying Ageism (Photography): Reminding everyone to remain young and sexy-at-heart. I found G.'s profile and after reading his positive and youthful attitude embodied, I extended my personal invitation into DEFIANCE, I started three years ago. G. is 57 years old and is openly gay. He is a software technical training manager for one of the leading computer technology corporations (think billions in revenue) in the San Francisco bay area. I enjoyed meeting G. because when we started our photography session, he shared his background information and I enjoy learning about the subject(s) I photograph. G. and R. have been married as long as I have been alive! (I will be 32 in February 2013). WOW! I felt I was interacting with a living time capsule. G. and R. married in 2008 before Proposition 8 came into notorious prominence. I felt the photography session was intellectually engaging for me. I love to be intellectually engaged. Not only G. shared about his marriage, he told me his experiences as an out gay man, when the gay rights and the AIDS scare started before I was conceived. G. and R. have lived in San Francisco during the 1980s. It was important for me to listen to G's personal experience because I came out nearly 7 years ago and the general society was OK with gay people. I could only imaging the harsh realities and stigma G. experienced during the 1980s! I personally invited G. because I wanted to pictorially discuss and challenge the topic of "ageism" in my DEFIANCE work.

Simpson, Paul (2010). Close Relationships of Midlife Gay Men.  Based on a PhD dissertation, Manchester University. Full Text. The study is about midlife gay men and ageing based on 28 in-depth interviews with men living in Manchester and observations in the Village district. What stops gay men of different ages getting up, close andpersonal with each other is explored... Nineteen out of 27 interviewees called themselves "single" and most saw this not as a lack of something but valued it for the independence it offered. Regardless of whether they were single,coupled or whatever, the most common story was the classic small circle of close friends, mostlygay men of a similar generation (and ten years either side of their age), with a fair number of acquaintances. Twelve men referred to their circle as a "family of choice," which included ex-loversand relatives. But, this kind of family is dynamic: some people leave (they die, fall out with eachother, move away) and new family members are adopted... Most (23interviewees) expressed a preference sexually for men over 30 to about ten years older thanthemselves. But, these were often not absolutes and several men in their mid forties had been inrelationships with men in their late sixties or seventies. But, there are a range of reasons as to whywe tend to prefer closeness with men of a similar generation... However, on the negative side, relationships between younger and older gay men were generallyseen as exceptional. Generational divisions run so deep and the differences between younger andolder gay men were so embedded in people's minds that they tended to escape critical thought. Thebarriers to intergenerational intimacies/friendships simply are. They are seen as an inevitable fact of life or human nature, which indicates just how deeply ageism is entrenched within gay male culture.Many interviewees saw friendships/relationships between young and older gay men as unnaturaland undesirable for several reasons.Showing a reverse ageism, an approach from a younger man could be seen either as a "piss take" or asign that the younger man was on the make - whether this was for a few free drinks or a "sugardaddy." (Two interviewees had taken younger men home only to find themselves robbed of possessions/money the next morning). But, this reduces cross-generational relationships to a kind of prostitution where youthful looks are traded for financial reward/security. Further, men below 30  could be trivialised as scatty, self-obsessed etc and "not relationship/friendship material." Youngermen are "vessels waiting to be filled" or one might "want an equal and not to be parent." There wasa widespread worry about being "old enough to be their parent/father" (even grandfather). Whilstsome saw that they had a moral duty of care not to use their experience to exploit a younger mansocially or sexually, others spoke of the pressures to avoid being cast as a predatory "chicken hawk." This thinking was quite shocking when intimacies between younger and older men were cast almostas a form of paedophilia even when the younger object of desire is well over the age of consent.You see these guys 40, 50 on Gaydar looking for guys aged 18 - 25... I don't get it. Go foryour own age. It's not illegal but My nephew's 26, y'know, its "obscene" I went to anephew's eighteenth and thought, "Oh, my God, there's men of my age wanting to sleep with men like him!" It's just not right. (Interviewee aged 48).

Cross generational relationships (2012): I too am an older man who has fallen in love with a man who is much younger. The relationship is magnificent in all respects. He is highly independent, spiritual, communicative and affectionate  The big “bump in the road” for me is that he is just now gearing up his education and has found a career focus that he is very excited about. He also has a very demanding interest in the theater.  `So, in essence, between school, part-time job and any free time being taken up by his other interest, I fear there is little if any time left for the relationship – at a time when I am increasingly available.  And to make it worse, I feel that I cannot do anything but support his new-found focus. So I support the very things that I am certain will ultimately ruin our relationship.... 'Comment Made': The situation you’ve described in common in inter-generational relationships (older/younger)...

Jones GP (1990). The Boy is Father to the Man: A Men's Studies Exploration of Intergenerational Interaction. Men's Studies Review, 7(1): 9-13. Full Text. Intergenerational intimacy between boys and men is presented as an important issue for the Men's Studies component of Gender Studies. Man/boy social intimacy is seen as potentially facilitating the anti-sexist socialization of boys as well as providing individual psychological benefits to the participants by means of breaking down restrictive male stereotypes. Specific potential benefits from such relationships include less homophobia, experience and practice in interpersonal interaction within a relatively familiar same-sex context, and contact for the younger male with a real adult "model" instead of the media- based models that are more typical for males in contemporary society. The rationale for encouraging same-sex intergenerational relationships derives from the fact that prior to adulthood developing humans focus first on same-sex associations and role models. This developmental process is outlined in some detail. Potential problems of males socializing other males are discussed. Previous studies are reviewed and suggestions for future research are presented.

Gay Intergenerational Relationships (2012): All the reading of the facts [above] is centered on the idea that the older man "takes advantage" of the younger for sexual purposes and that the youngest cannot resist and ends up "to collapse".  This interpretive scheme is widespread, even among gays, who tend to read intergenerational relationships in this way because (as the parent) they completely lack of realistic categories to interpret it correctly.  But let's get to what emerges from interviews with gay guys. It is obviously easier to meet in chat the youngest members of the intergenerational couples, but when I am contacted by guys who live intergenerational relationships I’m never asked for help and I never hear expressions of discomfort. It never happened. I find on the contrary a desire of the guy to be accepted and to be understood without prejudices for what he is. In practice, in almost all cases, the guys realize that they could very easily get out of the intergenerational relationship, that perhaps that relationship creates more problems to their older partners than to them and that their being "a couple" is a deep disvalue in the eyes of society and also of the gays themselves.  These guys do not feel at all haunted by their partners who often tend rather to let them go because of fear of affecting their lives so heavily. In these relationships, if you look at them closely, there is no plagiarism, there is no taking advantage of the possible weakness on the part of the younger guys, who anyway know very well that entering into relationships of this type they are going sharply against the current way of seeing sexuality.  These guys do not "collapse" but are rather looking for a relationship with older people, relationship that is consciously wanted and above all has for them a profound significance not only generally affective but explicitly sexual.

Perspectives on Intergenerational Love: Five Couples (2007): This essay discusses gay male intergenerational relationships. An intergenerational relationship is defined as one in which the partners are at least twenty years apart in age. The author gathered data on gay intergenerational relationships and highlights five couples. The author states that intergenerational male relationships break two stereotypes about gay men. These stereotypes are the belief that gay men value youth and that gay men are attracted to other men who like themselves. - Intergenerational Relationships Can Work (2013). - Inter Generation Relationships Part 3: Top Five Anxieties When Entering an Intergenerational Relationship.

Toward a Feminist Defense of Cross-Generational Homosexual Male Sex (2006): My own position on cross-generational sex is without question a product of my experiences. As such, it is undocumented and un-researched. For four years, I’ve been in an intimate relationship with a man who is fourteen years my senior. This relationship has provided me with maturity, perspective and levels of intimacy that would not be possible with someone my own age, “going through the same things as me.” I have heard many gay men share similar stories of transformative cross-generational relationships. Although I was nineteen years old when we first met and became involved, I could just as easily have been sixteen or seventeen. In fact, throughout my high school years, I craved sexual contact with adult men. My mother lived in terror that as an openly gay high-schooler in Greenwich Village, I would be “taken advantage” by predatory older males. My mother, a political progressive/leftist committed to GLBT rights struggles, manifested her homophobia in this fear of cross-generational sex. As a result, I often felt greater shame because of my desire for adult men than because of my same-sex desire more generally. But the majority of the boy-loving older men I’ve met are a far cry from the voracious wolf stereotype I was taught to fear. Many are protectors and nurturers who, if anything, are left wounded by their emotionally noncommittal younger partners... How can we ever hope to deconstruct heteronormativity without also deconstructing its most powerfully disempowering labels of “otherness”? What does “pedophile” mean within specific circumstances at specific times? How can we disrupt this term’s hold over our collective dominant cultural imagination and its ability to politically marginalize whole communities? I firmly believe that the current discourse of pedophilia functions more effectively to pathologize and vilify consensual intimate relationships between adult men and adolescent boys than it does to prevent age-based violence and abuse. 

Reflections on Cross Generational Relationships (2008): When I was a young man I was always attracted to older men. They were more handsome — surface style had cohered into deeper character and their good looks had more to do with experience than the smooth beauty of youth. Theirs was a beauty framed in wisdom. But somewhere along the line while I was falling in love with older men, I became one. Now it is my turn to be that seasoned, interesting person. I don’t particularly seek out younger men, they seem to find me. What do they want from me? is my first thought. So I ask and they tell me. One answered that he always thought older men were wiser, stronger — which is, of course, flattering. There is almost as much of an archetypal masculinity in those qualities as there is in the indisputable surface physical beauties of men... So while I may find it awkward at first when young men are drawn to me, I also know that maybe it confirms that I have kept fit and have much of the physical power I had in my youth — but that is not the only draw anymore. Their attentions test my supposed wisdom, challenge my assumptions, and in some ways, keeps me young by forcing me to keep my mind agile and flexible. And in exchange I can help the younger man to sort through the thousand natural shocks the flesh is heir to. It is easy to see reflections of our younger selves in their golden faces… perhaps they can begin to see into the future in ours. There is a rich tradition of honor in these relationships — not only honorable eroticism, but a passing along of our traditions as a same-sex loving people.

View/Advice/experience on cross generational relationships? (2013): I've been seeing this older guys for 6 months now. I'm 23 and he is 48... But even in the gay community, we both have gotten harsh and disgusted looks. Im over it since I've never been happier, just want to know if anyone else has been in a cross generational relationship, or how they feel about them?

Coming of Age: A Cultural Studies Approach to Aging (2001): Many of the authors in Figuring Age are concerned with the aging body and its fetishization in Western culture as decrepit and sexless -- most recently, as riddled with osteoporosis. Some focus on cross-generational tensions among aging mothers and aging daughters. As Woodward points out, this tension is also being played out metaphorically among older and younger women in academic women's studies. Interestingly, in her suggestive study of cross-generational relationships among lesbians in France, Marie-Claude Pasquier reflects that their model for same-sex relationships is not based on a narcissistic mother-daughter relationship but, rather, on a positive older sister-younger sister combination. - Cross-generational Lesbian Relationships Before ‘the Lesbian’: Conceptualisations of Women’s Same-Sex Sexuality in 1950s Rural Finland.

Bad Boy Street (2012, Film): As he’s gotten older, has he found himself role-reversing and being attracted to younger men?  “I’m still not very mature in myself, so I can’t really help or take care of somebody younger.  I think a lot of younger guys looking for older guys want that kind of stability and maturity and I don’t have that.”  Having been in cross-generational relationships, what does he think some of the difficulties are?  “When you’re older than someone else, they haven’t gone through the same sort of cultural experiences you have, you can’t reminisce about things that happened twenty years ago because they have no idea.  There’s also the external judgments that get placed on older/younger relationships.  “It’s the same thing with straight people.  There’s this idea that, oh this older person’s taking care of that person and or they’re going through a mid-life crisis so they’re with someone younger, which isn’t necessarily always the case.  When you fall in love with someone you fall in love with someone, it really doesn’t make a difference.  The love must come first.”  Despite its provocative title and erotic content, “Bad Boy Street” is definitely a film about love coming first, despite age or the constructed identities that we hide behind.  While you’re a witness to a relationship developing, you’re not led down a garden path to easy answers.  Verow likes ambiguity and open-endedness in films.

From White Crane Journal's - ContentsSpecial Spring 1998 Feature Section: AGING & Gay Men's Relationships. - Truth and Desire: What do gay men really want? - Reflections on Cross-Generational Relationships (1998). - Confessions of a Geezer Queen (1998). Other articles: Daddy & Son? The Complex Web of Younger/Older Relationship. - Daddy... Boy. - 5 Films for Intergenerational Couples. - POZ Community Forums: Do Intergenerational relationships really work? - Bill Maher on intergenerational relationships in interview (2007).

ClubSilver: Silver Daddy Dating For Older and Younger Gay Men. - Gay2December: The UK dating site dedicated to younger older gay relationships. - Alexander’s: Opened in 1997, Alexander’s is mainly a pickup bar [in Munich] where older men meet their hustlers.


To "The SEARCH Section" For The Best Search Engines & Information Directories, The Searchable Sites to Locate Papers & Abstracts... and The Sites - Some Searchable - Where "Free Papers" Are Available! 

Internet Resources

Resources: - LGBT retirement issues (Wikipedia). Google News Article Search: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or Transgender / Transsexual Aging Articles at Global Action on Aging. - Prime Timers WorldWide. - Caffmos: Not just a gay dating site, but a gay community where 'friendship' matters! A safe, & fun community for older gay men, silverdaddies, bears, and their admirers. - GayPride Parade`s Transgender Resources. - Mount Mercy University Library (2005): Social Issues - the isms Web Resources.- Vieillir en Rose ou la Gay Retraite: Resources (Translation). - Fugues: Vieillesses Articles (Translation).

United States: - Resource Center on LGBT Aging: - A New Resource for L.G.B.T. Seniors (2010): We’ve written in The New Old Age on occasion about the particular challenges that gay men and lesbians face as they age: the financial inequities that result from federal and state governments declining to recognize same-sex marriages; the fears of discrimination in senior housing and programs; the frequent reliance, when family support is missing, on friends who are aging as well. Sage, the nation’s oldest service and advocacy group for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender seniors, last week unveiled its online National Resource Center on LGBT Aging, underwritten by several foundations and a grant from the federal Department of Health and Human Services: Resources: Aging & Ageism. For Aging Providers. For LGBT Organizations. For LGBT Older Adults. LGBT Elder Abuse. Featured Resources. New & Upcoming Events. - GayPrideParade: a blog about LGBT aging. - APA Internet Resources. - Senior Action in a Gay Environment (SAGE).

American Society on Aging (ASA) LGBT Resources.
- LGBT Aging Project: Resources. - Center For Positive Aging: Resources for Older LGBT Persons - Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender. - Center for Medical Advocacy: Lesbian, Gay Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Seniors. - Wisconsin Department of Health Services: LGBT Older Persons Resources. - University of California (2009): Resources For Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Seniors- SAGE Olympia: LGBT Resources. -  National Gay and Lesbian Task Force: Elders. - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Intersex & 2-Spirit Senior's Resources for the East Bay (Contra Costa & Alameda Counties) and the San Francisco Bay Area. - The Apollo Network: This is an information site for older gay men as well as younger gay men who like mature gay men. - Resources for New York State Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Seniors. - Senior Health Resources (SHR) (To 2003): Established to provide a full array of quality health-related services for the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) community.  SHR focuses on individuals over age 40, and their community of family and friends who reside in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. - Gay Lesbian Association of Retiring Persons (GLARP). - Gay & Lesbian Elder Housing (GLEH).

Prime Timers of the Desert. - Gray Gay: For mature gay men and their admirers. - Temenos GLBT Senior's Resources. - Bobbi's writings about bisexuality. - Three videos on gay and lesbian elders. - 2005 LGBT Audio Visual Review (The Gerontologist). - OutSmart Magazine: 2001 Special Issue on GLBT Aging.

Old Lesbians Organizing for Change (OLOC). - Golden Threads. - Classic Dykes (To 2012). - Lavender Seniors of the East Bay

TransHealth Resources; Aging. -

AZTECA Project: This project is the fruition of an eight-year vision. It provides vital support and referral services to GAY Adult Latinos/ Latinas 50+ years of age.Azteca Project of is the first of its kind in the country to recognize this neglected community and link the cities mainstream social services with the elderly gay Latino community...  This Project provides free information which is available in both English and Spanish, regarding social services available in and out of the gay community [in California]. - Lambda Legal: Resources for TGNC Seniors. - Transgender Aging Network.

APA: Aging and Human Sexuality Resource Guide (To 2007-2009).  IGAINS'S Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Aging Online Resources (To 2008). - Recommended Resources (To 2008). - Outward"s Survey of Resources on LGBT Aging (To 2001). - LGBT Aging: Steven David Web Site (To 2005). - GayLawMet Aging Issues Links. - Sage, Upstate New York: Resources for New York State Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Seniors (2008). - Mount Mercy University Library: "The Ism" Web Resources (to 2008). - Lesbian and Gay Aging Issues Network (To 2010). 


United Kingdom: - Age UK: News Articles, Reports, etc., Search Results for: LGBT, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender. - Age Concern (Now called "Age UK": Information & Advice for Older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals (To 2007)... Publications & Resources (To 2007)... Web Resources (To 2005). - Age of Diversity, For older LGBT people throughout the UK: Resource Links. - GEMS: Gay Elderly Men's Society. - OLGA: Older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Trans Association.

Age UK Camden: The Opening Doors London project: provides a range of services and activities for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) people over 50 in London. - Silver Rainbow: For older lesbians and gay men in Croydon. - Older people: Info, Groups and Services.
- Older gay and Lesbian Groups.- The Lesbian & Gay Foundation: LGBT Carers Forum.


Berkshire Older Lesbian and Gay Forum. - Gray Gay Guide- Gay2December: The UK dating site dedicated to younger older gay relationships. - Older UK Lesbians: This is group is for Lesbians over 40 and their admirers. Chat, connect, swap ideas and enjoy. - Pink Cupid: Mature Lesbian Dating in UK.

Older Lesbians’ and Gay Men’s Forum Brighton and Hove (2002 to 2005). - The Metro Project: 50+ Group is for older Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual People (2003 to 2004). - Opening Doors in Gloucestershire (2003 to 2005). - Stradivarius (2001 to 2007).

Alzheimer's Society Helpline: Support for Lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) people with dementia, and their carers, partners, friends and relatives. They face many challenges - not only the challenges that people who are not in same sex relationships experience, but possibly many more.



Australia: - Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria, Australia: Aging Resources. - Gay and Lesbian Ageing Issues in Australia: Jo Harrison's Web Page. - The ALSO Foundation: Resources (To 2011, Related Information). GRAI: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Retirement Association Incorporated.

Inter~Section Melbourne (sexual minority and gay, lesbian, transgender and HIV/AIDS ageing issues): 2006 and 2007 Updates. - Inter~Section Melbourne: Gay & Lesbian Aging Issues (To 2008, Information to 2003). - Harrison, Jo (2010). Submission to: National Safety and Quality Framework in Australian Health. PDF Download. URLs for important documents / reports are given.


Canada: - GLBT Seniors' Resources (Ontario Government). - BC's Queer Resource Centre: Older Adults. - Senior Pride Network: Resources. - Prime Timer Toronto. - Victoria Lesbian Seniors Care Society: To support lesbian health and social needs as we age by providing safe, accessible, welcoming spaces to build community through public education and social action. The society is open to lesbians of all ages. VLSCS became an official entity in 1994.

Gay Seniors (Canada). - Gay Seniors, Canada news items archive: 2005 to 2008. - Association des Personnes Retraités Gaies

Gay & Lesbian Aging Research Project (2000 to 2006, online to 2012, McGill University). - Bruce County Senior's Portal: GLBT Resources (Not Updated). - Gay Retirement Guide (To 2011): The Internet's most comprehensive guide to gay retirement and gay retirement communities for LGBT seniors. Explore our online directory of gay retirement communities, gay retirement resources, gay retirement news and articles, and more.

Pour que vieillir soit gai: Un programme novateur (Trasnslation): En partenariat avec Gai Écoute, la Fondation Émergence propose un programme d’information et de sensibilisation aux réalités gaies lesbiennes, bisexuelles et transgenres (LGBT) destiné aux personnes qui oeuvrent auprès des personnes aînées ou qui les côtoient...La Fondation Émergence propose une trousse d’information et de sensibilisation à travers une série d’outils et de jeux qui visent à favoriser la discussion et à mieux faire connaître la réalité des aînés LGBT. Les outils de la trousse :  Affiche     Autocollant  Capsules vidéos  Charte de bientraitance   Dépliant    Diaporama et guide d'animation  Fiches d'information  Filmographie (PDF)  Jeux et exercices  Napperon  Recensement des études.


The Ultimate "Planet Out" Guide to Queer Movies (Subject: Aging/Elders) (To 2009). - LGBT elders on screen: queer film festival circuit offers range of images (July, 2000). -  Elder Gays and Lesbians in Literature and Film (1997). - A Century of Lesbian Pride (Review of two 1999 documentaries about lesbian elders: "Living With Pride" and "Golden Threads.")  - The Confession: Directed by Carl Pfirman, is a short dramatic film about two elderly gay men which explores love, betrayal and grief within a 35 year long relationship (2001). - Pink Sunset Villa (2003): A Home for Gay and Lesbian Elders. A film by Tjarda Hockstra. - Silent Pioneers (1986): Gay and Lesbian Elders. A film by Pat Snyder, Lucy Winer, Harvey Marks and Paula deKoenigsberg in consultation with SAGE. - Oscar Nominated Director to Document LGBT Seniors: Colors Straight Up (2000).  - Gay and Gray in New York City (1999, Film). 

Gay Seniors: LGBT Films: "Stonewall Uprising" Directed by: Kate Davis, David Heilbroner. -  "Silent Pioneers: Gay And Lesbian Elders" Produced and Directed by: Pat Snyder, Lucy Winer, Harvey Marks and Paula deKoenigsberg. - "Gen Silent" Produced and Directed by: Stu Maddux. - "Liberty: 3 Stories About Life & Death" Produced by: New Day Films. - "88 Years In The Closet" Produced and Directed by: Peter Shafron. - "It's About Time" Produced and Directed by: IN THE LIFE- Documentary Stories From The Gay Experience. - "Edie & Thea: A Very Long Engagement" Produced and Directed by: Susan Muska, Greta Olafsdottir. - "Ten More Good Years" Directed By: Michael Jacoby Produced by: Lookout Films. - "A Place To Live" Directed by: Carolyn Coal. Produced by: Cynthia Childs. - "Word Is Out " Produced and Directed by: Peter Adair. - "Beauty Before Age" Produced by: New Day Films. Directed by: Johnny Symons. - "Living With Pride: Ruth Ellis" Directed by: Yvonne Welbon.  

 

Bibliographies & Abstracts

Bibliography of Research and Clinical Perspectives on LGBT Aging (2008, APA, by Steven David, et al.). - LGBT Aging Articles (To 2011). - Amazon's GLBT Aging Books. - Aging in Transgender People: An Annotated Bibliography. - Books on LGBT Elders & Seniors at the UCSF Library & Internet Resources. - Council on Social Work Education: Sexuality and Aging Bibliography (2009). - LGBT Elders Bibliography For Infusion in Practice, HBSE, or Cultural Diversity Curriculum (2006, Word Download). - Bibliography from lesbianinformationservice.org. - Aging and Sexual Orientation Bibliography (To 2001). - Woolf"s References and Suggested Readings (To 1994). - Outward's Book Listing (To 2001). - Classic Dykes Bibliography (To 2001). - Older Gay Men: Research References (UK, To 1999). - SIECUS: Sexuality In Middle And Later Life Bibliography (To 2001). - GLBT Aging: Suggested Reading (To 1998). - Michael Flood's Bibliography: Men, mid-life and ageing (To 2006). - Gay Widows: The Journal Literature (To 2001). - CAPS' Elderly/AIDS/HIV Bibliography (2001). - Mental Health Issues of Particular Groups: Gay and Lesbian Seniors (To 2002). - APA Bibliography on Gay/Lesbian Aging (To 1987). - The Intersections of Age, Race/Ethnicity, Gender, Social Class and Sexual Orientation (To 2002, Word 97 Download). - Lesbian Aging Bibliography (To 1997). - Disability, Sexuality and Aging (To 2002). - LGBT Aging Bibliography (T 2001, APA: Word 97 Document). -- Trans-Health.com: Aging in Transgender People: An Annotated Bibliography (To 2002). - Aging in Transgender People: An Annotated Bibliography (2002). Older Gay Men: Research References (To 1997). LGBT Elders: Books from 1985 to 2011. - Tarynn Witten’s Bibliography: Transgender Aging (To 2008). - Caring for the Older LGBT Adult Bibliography (To 2008).
 

Abstracts: - Growing Old as a Gay Man: Psychosocial Well-Being of a Sexual Minority (2013). - Queer Patients and the Health Care Professional—Regulatory Arrangements Matter (2013). - Increased Risks of Needing Long-Term Care Among Older Adults Living With Same-Sex Partners (2013). - Health Disparities Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Older Adults: Results From a Population-Based Study (2013). - Risk and Protective Factors Associated with Health-Related Quality of Life Among Older Gay and Bisexual Men Living With HIV Disease (2013). - Caring for older HIV-positive men who have sex with men (2013). - Physical and Mental Health of Transgender Older Adults: An At-Risk and Underserved Population (2013). - Psychological and social adjustment in older transsexual people (2013). - “I'm still raring to go”: Successful aging among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults (2013). - Growing Old as a Gay Man: Psychosocial Well-Being of a Sexual Minority (2013).

Abstracts: - Training, geography, and provision of aging services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults (2012). - Community involvement, perceived control, and attitudes toward aging among lesbians and gay men (2012). - The Physical and Mental Health of Lesbian, Gay Male, and Bisexual (LGB) Older Adults: The Role of Key Health Indicators and Risk and Protective Factors (2012). - Aging Gay Men: A Review of the Literature (2012). - Correlates of Loneliness in Midlife and Older Gay and Bisexual Men (2012). - An Updated Social Context for Therapy with Elder Lesbian Couples (2012). - Gay and lesbian carers: ageing in the shadow of dementia (2012). - End-of-life care for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people (2012). - Midlife and Older Gay Men Living with HIV/AIDS: The Influence of Resiliency and Psychosocial Stress Factors on Health Needs (2012). -

Abstracts: - LGBT Aging: A Question of Identity (2011). - Assessing the Needs of Older Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender People: A Service-Learning and Agency Partnership Approach (2010). - Lesbian and Gay People's Concerns about Ageing and Accessing Services (2009). - Social Work Practice with Older Lesbians and Gay Men (2009). - Gay Male Sexual Identity in the Mid-Twentieth Century: Familial Reaction - A Case Study of Three Older Gay Men (2009). - Older GLBT Family and Community Life: Contemporary Experiences, Realities, and Future Directions (2009). - Pride or Prejudice? Gay Men, Lesbians and Dementia (2008). - Stress and coping among gay men: Age and ethnic differences (2008). - The Potential Impact of Discrimination Fears of Older Gays, Lesbians, Bisexuals and Transgender Individuals Living in Small- to Moderate-Sized Cities on Long-Term Health Care (2008). - Providing aged care services for the gay and lesbian community (2007). - Developmental Issues in Lesbian and Gay Adulthood (2007).- Gay grows up:an interpretive study on aging metaphors and queer identity (2007). - Gay and lesbian perceptions of discrimination in retirement care facilities (2007). - The process of losing and regaining credibility when coming-out at midlife (2006). - Overcoming barriers for older gay men in the use of health services: A qualitative study of growing older, sexuality and health (2006). - Understanding the lives of older gay people (2006). - Caregiving and post-caregiving experiences of midlife and older gay men and lesbians (2006). - When a partner dies: lesbian widows (2006). - Configurations of informal social support among older lesbians (2006). - Coming Out to Care: Caregivers of Gay and Lesbian Seniors in Canada (2007).

Abstracts: - Gay and Lesbian Aging: Current Perspectives and Future Directions for Social Work Practice and Research (2005). - Who's afraid of growing old? Gay and lesbian perceptions of aging (2005). - Crone Songs: Voices of Lesbian Elders on Aging in a Rural Environment (2004). - Racial disparities in sexual risk behaviors and drug use among older gay/bisexual and heterosexual men living with HIV/AIDS (2004). - Sunset Pink Villa: A Home for Gay and Lesbian Elders (2004). - Resistance and Resilience: The Untold Story of Gay Men Aging with Chronic Illness (2004). - Components of Internalized Homophobia, Self-Disclosure of Sexual Orientation to Physician, and Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care Completion in Older Gay Men (2004). - The health and social service needs of gay and lesbian elders and their families in Canada (2003). - The older homosexual: current concepts of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older Americans (2003). - Triple jeopardy: Targeting older men of color who have sex with men (2003). - Perceived barriers to social support from family and friends among older adults with HIV/AIDS (2003). - Elderly women, invisible lesbians (2003). - Community building with aging and old lesbians (2003).

Abstracts: - Looking back . . . looking forward: addressing the lives of lesbians 55 and older (2002). - Bisexuals at Midlife: Commitment, Salience, and Identity (2001). - Developing Anti‐Oppressive Empowering Social Work Practice with Older Lesbian Women and Gay Men (2001). - The adult life course and homosexual identity in midlife gay men (2001). - Attitudes on end-of-life care and advance care planning in the lesbian and gay community (2001). - Becoming the Men We're Ceasing to Be: A Gay Agenda for Aging in a Youth Culture (2001). - Aspects of mental health among older lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults (2001).

Abstracts: - Issues confronting lesbian and gay elders: the challenge for health and human services providers (2000). - The cross-culturing work of gay and lesbian elderly (2000). - Potential counseling concerns of aging lebian, gay, and bisexual clients (2000). - Social Support Networks of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adults 60 Years of Age and Older (2000). - Identity work among lesbian and gay elderly (1999). - Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Aging into the Twenty-First Century: An Overview and Introduction (1997). - At risk, infected, and invisible: Older gay men and HIV/AIDS (1995). - Social Support Networks of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adults 60 Years of Age and Older (1992). - The families of older gay men and lesbians (1992). - Psychotherapy and the older gay man (1977).

Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging, 25(2): Special 2013 Issue: Spirituality and Religion Among Older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adults (Abstracts): “I'm Created in God's Image, and God Don't Create Junk”: Religious Participation and Support Among Older GLBT Adults. - Effects of Age on Spiritual Well-being and Homonegativity: Religious Identity and Practices Among LGB Persons in Portugal. - Religious Affiliation and Successful Aging Among Transgender Older Adults: Findings From the Trans MetLife Survey. - “Oh My God, I'm Home”: The Socioreligious Significance of Gay Older Women's Experiences of Women's Bars Before Stonewall. - Religiousness, Spirituality, and Existential Well-being Among HIV-Positive Gay, Bisexual, and Other MSM Age 50 and Over. - The Intersection of Spiritual, Sexual, and National Identity: A Qualitative Study of Mature Dutch Women.

The Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services: - Abstracts from a Special Issue on the Elderly Vol 6(1), 1997: Gay and Lesbian Elderly: Historical Overview and Implications for Social Work Practice. - The Wisdom of Non-Hetrosexually Based Senior Housing and Related Services. - Playing BINGO with the best of Them: Community Initiated Programs for Older Gay and Lesbian Adults. - Staff Development for Working with Lesbian and Gay Elders. - Maturing Gay Men: A Framework for Social Service Assessment and Intervention. - Realities and Hopes for Older Gay Males. - The Story of Carrie and Anne: Long-Term Care Crisis. - Jim: Coming Out at Aged Sixty-Two. - Yvonne and Helen: Finding a Way to Trust.

The Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services, Volume 9 (1). 1999. Abstracts for:  The Social Support Needs of Older Lesbians, Gay Men, and Bisexuals - The Needs of Older Lesbians and Gay Men in Chicago.

The Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services, Volume 13 (4). 2001. Abstracts for: A Call to Action ("This call to action exposes how race, gender, class, and sexuality influence the plight of the aging in the United States.") - Is Having the Luck of Growing Old in the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Community Good or Bad Luck? - Aging in the United States Today. - Being Transgender and Older: A First Person Account. - Being Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and 60 or Older in North America. - Gay Men: Aging Well! - What Are Older Gay Men Like? An Impossible Question? - Gods or Monsters: A Critique of Representations in Film and Literature of Relationships Between Older Gay Men and Younger Men. - Retirement Intentions of Same-Sex Couples. - Preliminary Study of Caregiving and Post-Caregiving Experiences of Older Gay Men and Lesbians. - Vision and Older Adults. - Responding to the Mental Health and Grief Concerns of Homeless HIV-Infected Gay Men.

Books (Abstracts / Reviews)

Books: Are You Ready? The Gay Man's Guide to Thriving at Midlife - 1999 - by Rik Isensee (Google Books) (Short Review) (Review) (Advocate Review). - Golden Men: The Power of Gay Midlife - 2000 - by Harold Kooden, with Charles Flowers  (Excerpt) (Interview with Author) (Review) (Advocate Review) (Excerpt: Tools for the Journey of Gay Aging) - Gay men and aging - 1997 - edited by Lester Brown (Abstract). - Gay Men at Midlife: Age before Beauty - 2001 - edited by Alan L. Ellis. - Men Like Us : The Gmhc Complete Guide to Gay Men's Sexual, Physical, and Emotional Well-Being - 2000 - by Daniel Wolfe (Topics related to middle and later life include ageism, AIDS and older men, and the prostate) (Press Release) (Abstract). - Reeling in the Years: Gay Men's Perspectives on Age and Ageism - 2004 - by Tim Bergling (Can older gay men really be friends with younger gay men?) (Related Information) (Related Article) (Review: PDF Download) (Review). - The Gay Man's Guide To Grown Older - 2002 - by John Lockhart (Interview With Authort, Alternate Link). - Sociological Analysis of Aging: The Gay Male Perspective - 2003 - by J. Michael Cruz. - Village Elders - by Penny Coleman. - A Gift of Age. Old Lesbian Life Stories - 2009 - by  by Arden Eversmeyer, Margaret Purcell (Review). - Gay and Lesbian Elders: History, Law, and Identity Politics in the United States - 2011 - by Nancy J. Knauer (Google Books). - Ageism and Looksism Among Gay Men (Dissertation) - 2006 - by Steven David (Google Books). - Aging with HIV: A Gay Man's Guide - 2011 - by James Masten, James Schmidtberger (Google Books) (Introduction) (Review) (Review).

Books: Quiet Fire: Memoirs of Older Gay Men - 1985 - edited by Keith Vacha (Reference made in Bob Basker: An Activist's Life: A Founding Father of the Midwest). - Cohler, B.J., & Hostetler, A. J. "Understanding intimacy in the lives of older gay men: Cohort, sexual lifeway and life-story" by BJ Cohler & AJ Hosteller. In: Challenges of the third age: Meaning and purpose in later life.- 2001 - edited by S. Weiss & S.A. Bass. - Social Services for Senior Gay Men and Lesbians (Monograph Published Simultaneously As the Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 2(1), 1997) edited by Jean K. Quam. - The Changing of the Guard: Lesbian and Gay Elders, Identity, and Social Change - 2003 - by Dana Rosenfeld: Chapter 1 - Introduction: The Distinctiveness of Lesbian and Gay Elders (PDF Download) (Amazon) (Google Books). - Gay and Lesbian Aging: Research and Future Directions - 2004 - edited by Gilbert Herdt, Brian, De Vries (Google Books) (Contents / Introduction / Chapter 1). - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Aging: Research and Clinical Perspectives - 2006 - edited by Douglas Kimmel [Full Text: Sexuality in the Lives of Aging Lesbian and Bisexual Women]. - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Aging: Challenges in Research, Practice, and Policy - 2012 - edited by Tarynn M. Witten, A. Evan Eyler (Google Books). - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Ageing: Biographical Approaches for Inclusive Care and Support - 2012 - edited by Richard Ward, Ian Rivers and Mike Sutherland (PPT Description as PDF) (Google Books) (Review). - Older GLBT family and community life - 2009 - edited by Christine A. Fruhauf, Dan Mahoney.

Books: The Beauty of Men - 1996 - by Andrew Holleran (Review) (Interview) (Interview) (Review). - Gay and Gray: The Older Homosexual Man, Second Edition - 1995 - by Raymond M. Berger (Google Books). - Quincunx - 1990 - by P.H. Colley (Review). - Gay Money: Your Personal Guide to Same-Sex Strategies for Financial Security, Strength, and Success - 1997 - by Per Larson (Review) (Review). - Village Elders - 2000 - by Penny Coleman (Review). - Midlife and Aging in Gay America: Proceedings of the SAGE Conference 2000 - 2002 - by  D. C. Kimmel & D. L. Martin (Review). - Michael Tolliver Lives: A Novel - 2007 - by Armistead Maupin (Related Article) (Related Article) (Review). - Midlife And Older LGBT Adults: Knowledge And Affirmative Practice For The Social Services - 2005 - by Ski Hunter. - Sexual Orientation and Gender Expression in Social Work Practice: Working with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender People - 2006 - edited by Deana F. Morrow and Lori Messinger (Google Books) (Review). - Growing Older: Perspectives on LGBT Aging - 2009 - by James T. Sears.

Books: The Lesbian Family Life Cycle - 1991 - by Suzanne Slater (Chapters include "The Middle Years" and "Lesbian Couples over 65") (Abstract) (Table of Contents) - Midlife Lesbian Relationships: Friends, Lovers, Children, and Parents - 2000 - edited by Marcy R. Adelman. - Long Time Passing: Lives of older lesbians - 1986 - by Marcy Adelman. - Old Dyke Tales - 1984, 1988 - Short Stories - by Lee Lynch (Related Information). - Lesbians at Midlife: The Creative Transition - 1991 - edited by Barbara Sang, Joyce Warshow, and Adrienne Smith. (One Part online: Desire Perfected: Sex After Forty) - Women Who Love Sex: An Inquiry into the Expanding Spirit of Women’s Erotic Experience - 1999 -  by Gina Ogden (Foreword). - Gay Old Girls - 1998 - by Zsa Zsa Gershick. - Dyke Life: From Growing Up To Growing Old, A Celebration Of The Lesbian Experience - 1996 - edited by Karla Jay (Google Books). - Ageism in the Lesbian Community - 1987 - by Baba Copper. - Look Me in the Eye: Old Women, Aging and Ageism - 1983 / 2001 - by Cynthia Rich, Barbara MacDonald (Excerpts).

Thompson EH (2004). Expressions of manhood: reconcilling sexualities, masculinities, and aging. The Gerontologist, 44(5): 714. PDF Download - Full Text. Review Essay of 3 books: Gay and Lesbian Aging: Research and Future Directions - 2004 - edited by Gilbert Herdt and Brian de Vries.  - Reeling in the Years: Gay Men’s Perspectives on Age and Ageism - 2004 - by Tim Bergling. - Sociological Analysis of Aging: The Gay Male Perspective - 2003 - by J. Michael Cruz. -- Being women, then lesbians, then old: Femininities, sexualities and aging. The Gerontologist (2006), 46, 300-305 (Full Text): Review Essay: Midlife and Aging in Gay America - 2002 - edited by Douglas C. Kimmel and Dawn Lundy Martin. - Midlife and Older LGBT Adults: Knowledge and Affirmative Practice for the Social Services - 2005 - by Ski Hunter. - Lives of Lesbian Elders: Looking Back, Looking Forward - 2005 - by D. Merilee Clunis, Karen I. Fredriksen-Goldsen, Pat A. Freeman, and Nancy Nystrom. - Whistling Women: A Study of the Lives of Older Lesbians - 2005 - by Cheryl Claassen.



The "SEARCH Section" For...
The Best Search Engines & Information Directories, The Searchable Sites to Locate Papers & Abstracts...
And The Sites - Some Searchable - Where "Free Papers" Are Available!

Search Engines & Directories: Google.com. - Google Scholar. - MSN Search.- Proteus Search. - Wikipedia Listing of Search Engines. - All GLBT Resource Directories. - Google's GLBT Directory. - Yahoo's Directory. - DMOZ: Open Directory. - BGLAD. - Wikipedia. - GLBTQ: The Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender & Queer Culture.

Directories for Open Access Resources: - The Directory of  Open-Access Journals. - Registry of Open Access Repositories (ROAR). - Yahoo Theses Access Directory. - Google Directory: Free Access Online Archives.

Open Access Collections From Multiple Sources: - Australian Research Online. - hal: articles en ligne (French / English Version). - Archive Ouverte INRIA. - Hispana. Directorio y recolector de recursos digitales. - Red de Revistas Científicas de América Latina y el Caribe, España y Portugal- Pacific Rim Library. - OAIster: a union catalog of available digital resources. - OpenPDF.com. - OpenJ-Gate: Open Access. findarticles.com: many free full text articles and papers. - Scribd.com

Search for Free Papers / Book Reviews: - All Papers are free at BioMed Cental (Open Access) & PubMed Central. - HighWire Press (Numerous Free Papers).  eScholarship Repository:  University of California, e-books, journals and peer-reviewed documents. - DSpace Eprints: Australian National University. - DSpace@MIT. - Virginia Tech: Digital Library / Archives. - eScholarship: U of California. - University of Southampton CiteBase. - Eprints: University of Nottingham. - T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries.  - NTUR, National Taiwan University- Allacademic: Some free papers to either read online or download as PDFs. -  UNESCO: Articles, Report, Dissertations, Films, etc. - Kyoto University Research Information Repository. - Doctoral dissertations and other publications from the University of Helsinki- E-LIS: eprints in Library & Information Services. - CogPrints: eprints. - RePEc: Research Papers in Economics. - DiVa: Scandinavian University Documents. - The International Gay & Lesbian Review (IGLR): Book Reviews & Abstracts. - InterAlia, a peer-edited scholarly journal for queer theory

Search for Free Articles, Papers or ReportsFindArticles.com - The Free Library. - France Queer Resources Directory. - Séminaire gai. - The QRD. - GLBTQ: The Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender & Queer Culture. - Human Rights Campaign. - IGLHRC: The International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission. - ILGA: The International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association. - ILGA-Europe: International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association of Europe. - Magnus Hirschfeld Archive for Sexology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. - Kinsey Institute Staff Publications. - Sexual Policy Watch Working Papers. NAZ Foundation International: Primary aim is to improve the sexual health and human rights of marginalised males who have sex with males, their partners and families in South Asia and elsewhere.  The World Health Orgazization. - The Body: The complete HIV/AIDS Resource. - POZ Magazine: Archive dates back to 1994.

Search for Papers, with Abstract Available (Some May Be Free): The National Library of Medicine (Free papera are highlighted). Abstracts from searches are available at: ERIC: The Education Resources Information Center (Many Free Documents). - Informaworld. - Oxford Journals (Some Open Access Content). - Springer Journals (Some Open Access Content). - ScienceDirect Journals. - University of California Press Journals on Caliber. - IngentaConnect. - Project Muse. - JSTOR: The Scholarly Journal Archive. - Wiley Interscience. - Cambridge Journals Online: Follow Link. - Sage Journals. - Palgrave Macmillan Journals. - Emerald E-journals. - University of Chicago Journals. - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Journals. - HeinOnline (Access Free Content, Law Papers). - SSRN: Social Science Research Network.

Search for Free Theses / Dissertations, May Include Papers: Library & Archives Canada, Electronic Free Theses Download. - Virginia Tech: Electronic Theses and Dissertations. - DSpace@MIT. - Electronic Theses & Dissertations BYU. - OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) Center & Worldwide ETD Index. - Australasian Digital Theses Program (Abstracts Given & Free Downloads). - Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (Abstracts). - PQDTOpen Dissertations (Abstracts & Free Downloads: ProQuest). DART-Europe: Free Access to European Doctoral Theses. - The British Library's EThOS service (British Doctoral Theses Abstracts). - DORAS: Free Theses,  Ireland. - TEL (thèses-en-ligne). - DiVa: Scandinavian Theses / Other Documents. - BORA: Open Archive, University of Bergen, Norway.  - Doctoral dissertations and other publications from the University of Helsinki. - LUP: Lund University Publications. - National Cheng Kung University Institutional Repository. - HKU Scholars Hub. - Biblioteca Digital de Teses e Dissertacoes (BDTD), Brazil. - OAIster: a union catalog of available digital resources. Free papers also available - OpenThesis.org.

Full Text GLBTQ Papers / Articles by/at: - Gay & Lesbian Issues and Psychology Review. -  Archive of Sexology Full Text Papers. - Hawaii AIDS Education and Training Center: AIDS Education Project. - Arlene Istar Lev. - F. Kenneth Freedman. - Margaret Nichols & IPG Staff. - Michael Shernoff. - Gary Remafedi. - Susan Cochran & Vickie Mays (and Others). - Gregory M. Herek and others. - Esther Rothblum. - First International Conference of Asian Queer Studies: Index of Papers. (Related Book) - "Queer Space: Centres and Peripheries" Conference Papers. -  Sexualities: Bodies, Desires, Practices: Project Archives: 2nd Global Conference on Sex & Sexuality Papers,  2005,  3rd Conference, 2006: Probing the Problematics: Sex and Sexuality. Papers in one PDF + More Conferences. - Intersections: Gender & Sexuality in Asia and the Pacific. - The Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review - Special Issue, 1996: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People and Education (Many Authors, abstracts, articles). - The International Journal of Transgenderism (Many Authors, Official Journal of the Harry Benjamin International Gender Dysphoria Association: HBIGDA). - Lesbigay SIGnals. - Self-Help Psychology Magazine. - Australian Humanities Review Archive Index. - Schools Out Document Resource. - All NGLTF Documents. - National Coalition for LGBT Health: Downloading Page For Full Text Papers and Reports.

Full Text Articles / Papers / Studies / Reports (and/or Abstracts):

Gay and Lesbian Issues and Psychology Review, 2(2), 2006: Special GLBTI Ageing Issues (PDF Download. Download Page.). Contents: Editorial - Articles: Coming out ready or not! Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex ageing and aged care in Australia: Reflections, contemporary developments and the road ahead. - Queer ageing. Ageing gay men’s bodies. Coming out, coming in: How do dominant discourse around aged care facilities take into account the identities and needs of ageing lesbians? - Heteronormativity amongst staff of residential aged care facilities. Commentaries: Non-technical equivalence for lesbians, gay men and transgender people in community services for seniors. - Addressing gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex ageing in Western Australia. - We are aged, we are queer, we are here. - Book Reviews: Reeling in the years: Gay men’s perspectives on age and ageing.

Hudson RB, et al (Eds) (2011). Integrating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults into Aging Policy and Practice. Public Policy & Aging Report, 21(3). Sage. PDF Download. --- Resilience and Disparities among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults. -- The Diverse Elders Coalition and LGBT Aging: Connecting Communities, Issues, and Resources in a Historic Moment. -- Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults. -- Reflections on Advancing an LGBT Aging Agenda. -- How Health Care Reform Will Help LGBT Elders. -- Safe Spaces? The Need for LGBT Cultural Competency in Aging Services. -- Bridging the Service Gap: LGBT Older Adults, Public-Private Partnerships and Program Innovation. -- The Policy Issues and Social Concerns Facing Older Adults with HIV. -- LGBT Aging: Research and Policy Directions.

Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Issues and Research Gaps and Opportunities; Board on the Health of Select Populations; Institute of Medicine (2011). The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding. The National Academic Press. Full Text & PDF Download. Full Text & PDF Download. Later Adulthood: PDF Download. PDF Download.

Aitken S, Kealey S, Adamson R (2007). LGBT Community Needs Assessment Report. Edinburgh, Scotland: LGBT Centre for Health and Wellbeing. PDF Download. Download Page.

Age Concern England (2002). Opening doors … to the needs of older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals: A one-day conference held in London in April 2002. Web Page for PDF Downloads & Related Information: - Transcripts of Presentations. - Workshops 1-10. - Workshops 11-18 N/A. - Report on Conference.

Age Concern England (2002). The Whole of Me - Resource Pack. PDF DownloadPDF Download.

Age Concern England (2002). Issues facing Older Lesbians, Gay Men and Bisexuals. PDF DownloadPDF Download

Age Concern England (2001). "Opening Doors. Working with older lesbians and gay men": "In July 2001, Age Concern England published ‘Opening Doors – A Resource Pack’, which advises organisations on how to make their services more welcoming and inclusive of older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals. Topics addressed include getting to understand your client group, awareness, language and terminology, how to get started, consultation and setting up services. More recently, ahead of its Opening Doors Conference, the organisation published a supplement to the Resource Pack, 'Opening Doors: A Literature Review'. This shows particularly how older lesbians, gay men and bisexuals have remained invisible because many organisations have failed to investigate their needs." Related Information: Some Documents available online. - PDF Download. - Opening Doors: an overview.

AGE Platform Europe and The European Region of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (2012). Equality for older lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex people in Europe. PDF Doiwnload. Download Page.

American Medical Directors Association (2012): The Care of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans-Gender Persons in The Long-Term Care Setting: White Paper: Resolution A-12. Full Text.

American Society on Aging, Edward R. Roybal Institute for Applied Gerontology, Cal State LA (2001). Live Long, Live Well: Health Promotion for Older Adults. Table of Contents: Full Text (HTML.or Word Downloads).

Anti-Discrimiation Board (----). Working Paper from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (GLBTI) Ageing and Discrimination Forum. Full Text. Archive Link.

Auldridge A, Tamar-Mattis Kennedy S, Ames E, Tobin HJ (2012). Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults; Recommendations for Policy and Practice. New York, NY: Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) and National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE). PDF Download. PDF Download. Read Online.

Baker K, Krehely J (2011). How Health Care Reform Will Help LGBT Elders. Public Policy & Aging Report, 21(3): 19-23. PDF Download.

Bamford S-M, Kneale D, Watson J (2011, International Longevity Centre - UK ). Intergenerational projects for the LGBT community; A toolkit to inspire and inform. Download Page. PDF Download.

Barrett, Catherine (2008). My People: A project exploring the experiences of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex seniors in aged-care services. Victoria, Australia: Matrix Guild Victoria Inc & Vintage Men. PDF, Download Page.

Baumgartner Jr, Thomas C (2007). Aging and sexual minorities: exploring the health and psychosocial issues of older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (lgbt) individuals. PhD Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. PDF Download

Beausoleil, Jacques (1996). Homosexualité et vieillissement. Conférence donnée au colloque Le vieillissement et la santé mentale organisé par l'Association canadienne de santé mentale - Montréal. Full Text

Benevedes JM (2006). Making Meaning of Seroconversion in Older Gay Men. Focus, 21(10): 5-6. PDF Download. PDF Download.

Bennett L, Gates GJ (2004). The Cost of Marriage Inequality to Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Seniors. A Human Rights Campaign Foundation Report.  PDF Download. Download Page. PDF Download. Download Page.

Bessin M, Blidon M (2011). Déprises sexuelles : penser le vieillissement et la sexualité [Thinking aging and sexuality]. Genre, sexualité & société, 6, Autromne. Full Text.

Bettinger, Thomas V (2007). Gay Men at Midlife and Adult Learning: An Uneasy Truce with Heteronormativity. Paper presented at the "Learning In Community: Proceedings of the joint international conference of the Adult Education Research Conference" (AERC) 48th National Conference) and ay the "Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE)/l'Association Canadienne pour l'Étude de l'Éducation des Adultes" (ACÉÉA) (26th National Conference).Edited by Laura Servage and Tara Fenwick (June 2007). PDF Download.

Bigler, Mark O (Utah AIDS Foundation, 2000). Generational Differences Among Gay Men In the Coming Out Process, Self-Esteem, and HIV Risk. PDF Download.

Birch H (2009). Dementia, Lesbians and Gay Men. Paper 15, Alzheimer’s Australia. PDF Download.

Birch H (2006). Are we there yet? Key collaborations on the pathway to quality services for GLBT seniors in Victoria. Paper presented at the 2006 Australian Association of Gerontology Conference. PDF Download. Download Page.

Birch H (2004). What about us? Positive Ageing is Also a Gay and Lesbian Issue! Paper presented at the 2004 Australian Association of Gerontology Conference, Melbourne.  PDF Download. Download Page.

Birch H, The ALSO Foundation’s Community Development Committee (2004). About Time! GLBT Seniors ALSO Matter: Strategic Plan. Full Text.

Birch H (2004). About Time!: GLBT Seniors ALSO MatterFull Text.

Blando JA (2001). Twice Hidden: Older Gay and Lesbian Couples, Friends, and Intimacy. Generations, 25(2): 87-89. PDF Download. PDF Download.

Blank TO, et al. (2009). Gay Men's Knowledge and Attitudes about the Prostate and Prostate Cancer. PPT Presentation, 30th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions, Society of Behavioral Medicine, Montreal. PDF Download.

Brotman S, Ryan B (2008). Healthy Aging for Gay and Lesbian Seniors in Canada: An Environmental Scan. McGill University, School of Social Work, Montréal QC. PDF Download.

Brotman S, Ryan B, Collins S, Chamberland L, Cormier R, Julien D, Meyer E, Peterkin A, Richard B (2007). Coming out to care: caregivers of gay and lesbian seniors in Canada. Gerontologist, 47(4): 490-503. PDF Download. PDF Download.

Brotman S, Ryan B, Cormier R (2002). Mental Health Issues of Particular Groups: Gay and Lesbian Seniors. In: "Writings in Gerontology: Mental Health and Aging (18)" (Table of Contents) Full Text. PDF. Whole Document.

Brotman S, Ryan B, Cormier R (2003). The Health and Social Service Needs of Gay and Lesbian Elders and Their Families in Canada. Gerontologist, 43: 192-202. Full Text

Brotman S, Ryan B, Cormier R (2002). Questions relatives à la santé mentale de certains groupes: Les aînés gais et lesbiennes. Dans: "Écrits en Gérontologie: Santé mentale et vieillissement (18)" (Table des Matières) Full Text. PDF. Whole Document.

Brotman S, Ryan B, Meyer E (2006). The Health and Social Service Needs of Gay and Lesbian Seniors and Their Families in Canada. Executive Summary: PDF Download. Information & Download Page. PDF Download.

Brotman S, Ryan B, Meyer E (2006).Les besoins en santé et services sociaux des aînés gais et lesbiennes et de leurs familles au Canada. Rapport Synthese: PDF Download.

Brown, Maria (2009). LGBT Aging and Rhetorical Silence. Sexuality Research & Social Policy, 6(4): 65-78. PDF Download.

Brown, Maria (2009). LGBT Aging and Rhetorical Silence. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 07. Full Text.

Burbank, Pat (2008). Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender and Queer Elders: Issues of an Invisible Population. Keynote address to the Rhode Island Foundation Equaity Action’s LGBTQ Elder Summit. Providence, RI: 2008. PPT Download.

Cahill S, South K, Spade J: NGLTF (2000). Outing Age: Public Policy Issues Affecting Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Elders. PDF Download. PDF Download. Download Page. All NGLTF Documents. (Related Article) (Related Article)

Cantor M, Brennan M, Shippy RA (2004). Caregiving among older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender New Yorkers.  New York: National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute. PDF Download. PDF Download. Home Page.

Carers UK (2003). Policy Briefing: Lesbian and Gay Carers. PDF Download.

Carr S, Ross P (2013, UK). Assessing Current and Future Housing and Support Options for Older LGB People. Joseph Roundtree Foundation. PDF Download.

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (2007). ARQ2: Asking the right questions 2: "Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, transsexual, two-spirit, intersex, and queer (LGBTTTIQ) people have specific life factors that relate to substance use and/or mental health problems. These factors include “coming out,” gender transition, societal oppression, loss of family support, isolation, and the predominance of bars in LGBTTTIQ communities. To provide effective addiction and mental health services, therapists/counsellors need to be aware of these life factors in clients. Asking the Right Questions 2 will help service providers create an environment where all clients feel comfortable talking about their sexual orientation and gender identity. See: "ARQ2: Question B6 - Body image and aging." Full Text. PDF Download.

Chamberland, Line (2010). Le  vieillissement chez les lesbiennes : y a-t-il des enjeux spécifiques ? Labrys, études féministes / estudos feministas, janvier/juin. Full Text. Translation.

Chamberland L, Paquin J (2004)Vieillir en étant soi-même, Le défi de l’adaptation des services résidentiels aux besoins des lesbiennes âgées. ARIR (Alliance de recherche entre l’Institut de recherches et d’études féministes (IREF) de l’UQAM et Relais-Femmes), UQAM, RLQ/QLN, Montréal 2004. Le condensé de  « Vieillir en étant soi-même » a été rendu possible grâce à une subvention du Réseau des Ministère de la famille et des aînés. Diane Heffernan, coordinatrice lesbiennes du Québec. Word Download. Translation.

Chamberlain C, Robinson P (2002). The Needs of Older Gay, Lesbian and Transgender People. A report prepared for the ALSO Foundation. PDF Download. Download Page PDF Download.  

Chapin R, et al. (2002). Aging and GLBT Older Person. School of Social Welfare, University of Kansas. PDF Download.

Chicago Task Force on LGBT Aging (2003). LGBT Persons in Chicago: Growing Older: A Survey of Needs and Perceptions. PDF Download.

City And County Of San Francisco Human Rights Commission and Aging And Adult Services Commission (Report, 2003). Aging In The Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Communities. Full Text: PDF Download.

Cook-Daniels L (2008). Aging as Ourselves: LGBT Aging Health Issues for Health Care Providers. PDF Download.

Cook-Daniels L (2007). Transforming Mental Health Services for Older People: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Challenges and Opportunities. A paper presented at the AARP Diversity and Aging in the 21st Century Conference. June 21, 2007. Los Angeles, California. PDF Download.

Cook-Daniels L (2004). The Future of Aging: Re-Defining Aging Services & Advocacy for LGBT Older Adults. Plenary presentation at the "No Need to Fear? No Need to Hide? Aging On Our Own Terms" 2004 SAGE Conference. PDF Download. Download Page

Cook-Daniels L (2002)Transgender Elders and SOFFAs: A Primer. Paper presented at the 2002  110th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association. PDF Download. Download Page. PDF Download.

Cook-Daniels L (1998). Lesbian, Gay Male, Bisexual and Transgendered Elders: Elder Abuse and Neglect Issues. Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect, 9(2): 35-49. Abstract. Full Text Full Text. PDF Download. PDF Download.

Coon, David (2003). Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Issues and Family Caregiving. The Family Caregiver Alliance. PDF Download.

Cooperman NA, Arnsten JH, Klein RS (2007). Current sexual activity and risky sexual behavior in older men with or at risk for HIV infection. AIDS Education and Prevention, 19(4): 321-333. Abstract. PDF Download.

Cosby, Robert (2008). "We Expect To Be Treated The Same": A qualitative study with aging same-sex couples and long-term care. Master of Social Work Dissertation, McMaster University. PDF Download. Download Page.

D'Augelli AR, Grossman AH (2001). Disclosure of sexual orientation, victimization, and mental health among lesbian, gay, and bisexual older adults. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 16, 1008-1027. PDF Download. Download Page. Sage Abstract.

D'Augelli AR, Grossman AH, Hershberger SL, O'Connell TS (2001). Aspects of mental health among older lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults. Aging and Mental Health, 5 (2), 149-158. PDF Download N/A. Download Page. Abstract.

Davidson, Darcy (2001). Issues Facing Elderly Gay Men and Lesbians. Full Text. PDF Download.

Davies A, Halliday J (2004). Elderly abuse and intersectionality - Gay and lesbian seniors: the invisible population. PDF Download. Conference Presentation. Download Page.

Davies M, Addis S, MacBride-Stewart S, Shepherd M (2005+). The Health, Social Care and Housing needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender older people: literature review. Centre for Health Science Research, Cardiff University,  PDF Download N/A. 2009 Abstract.

Davis, Lyn (2003). Community Care Inclusion Project. Victoria, B.C: Victoria Lesbian Seniors Care Society. PDF Download. Download Page.

Diehl, Brian (2013). LGBT Aging and Elder Care. Honors Dissertation, Social Work, Bridgewater State University. PDF Download.

Dinkel S (2005). Providing Culturally Competent Care to Lesbians. Kansas Nurse, 80(9): 10-12. Full Text N/A. Reference.

The Diversity Center (2004). A Summary of Findings: Survey of the Senior Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender (LGBT) Community of Santa Cruz County, California. PDF Download.

Donaldson, Weston (2012). Attitudes of Heterosexual Assisted Living Residents Toward Gay and Lesbian Peers. Master's Dissertation, Colorado State University. PDF Download.

Drumm, Kris (2004). An Examination of Group Work with Old Lesbians Struggling with a Lack of Intimacy by Using a Record of Service. Journal of Gerontological Social Work. 44(1/2: 25-52. PDF Download.

Drummond M (2006). Ageing gay men’s bodies. In: Harrison J, Riggs DW (Editors, 2006). Gay and Lesbian Issues and Psychology Review, 2(2):  60-66. PDF DownloadAlternate Link.

Edwards JE (2005). Designing for the gay seniors population: a look at Len Cotsovolos's interior-design plan for RainbowVision Santa Fe, a gay-oriented seniors community. Nursing Homes,  October.  Full Text. Nursing Homes Magazine: Table of Content.

Emlet CA (2006). "You’re Awfully Old to Have This Disease": Experiences of Stigma and Ageism in Adults 50 Years and Older Living With HIV/AIDS. The Gerontologist, 46(6): 781-790. PDF Download.

Enum Y, et al. (2009). Older People’s Mental Health Needs Assessment For Depression, Dementia and Severe Mental Illness (Draft). East London NHS Foundation and NHS Tower Hanlets. PDF Download. PDF Download.

Equality and Human Rights Commission (2011, UK). Close to Home: Inquiry into older people and human rights in home care. Equality and Human Rights Commission. PDF Download.

Fenge L-E, Hicks C (2011). Hidden lives: the importance of recognising the needs and experiences of older lesbians and gay men within healthcare practice. Diversity in Health and Care, 8: 147–154. PDF Download.

Fenge L-E, et al. (2010). Connecting Participatory Methods in a Study of Older Lesbian and Gay Citizens in Rural Areas. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 9(4): 320-333. PDF Download.

Flaxman, Nancy (2001). Isolated and Underserved: Reaching Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Seniors. Marquette Elder's Advisor, 3(1): Article 5. PDF Download.

Fredriksen-Goldsen KI, et al. (2013). Physical and Mental Health of Transgender Older Adults: An At-Risk and Underserved Population. The Gerontologist, Online First. PDF Download.

Fredriksen-Goldsen KI, Kim H-J, Emlet CA, Muraco A, Erosheva E A, Hoy-Ellis CP, Goldsen J, Petry H (2011). The Aging and Health Report: Disparities and Resilience among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults - Key Findings Fact Sheet. Seattle: Institute for Multigenerational Health. PDF Download.

Fredriksen-Goldsen K, Kim H-J, Goldsen J, Hoy-Ellis CP, Emlet CA, Erosheva EA, Muraco A (2013). LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Health, Risks, and Resilience - Findings from Caring and Aging with Pride. Report prepared for the LGBT Aging Policy Task Force, San Franciscon, CA. Seattle, Washington: Institute for Multigenerational Health, University of Washington. PDF Download.

Fredriksen-Goldsen KI, et al. (2011). The Aging and Health Report: Disparities and Resilience among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults.  PDF Download. Executive Summary: PDF Download.

Funders for Lesbian and Gay Issues (2004). Aging In Equity: LGBT Elders in America. PDF Download.

Gallanis TP (2002). Aging and the Nontraditional Family. University of Memphis Law Review, 32: 607-642. PDF Download.

Garnets L, Peplau LA (2006). Sexuality in the lives of adult lesbian and bisexual women. In D. C. Kimmel, T. Rose, & S. David (Eds.) Research and clinical perspectives on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender aging, pp. 70-90. New York: Columbia University Press. PDF Download N/A. Download Page.

Gay & Grey in Dorset (2006). Lifting the Lid on Sexuality and Ageing: A research project into the needs, wants, fears and aspirations of older lesbians and gay men. Published by Help and Care Development Ltd. PDF Download.

Global Action on Aging (2006). Alcohol and Seniors: Alcohol Dependence and Misuse among Older Gay and Lesbian People. Full Text.

GRAI: GLBTI Retirement Association Incorporated (2010). “We don’t have any of those people here.” Retirement Accommodation and Aged Care Issues for Non-Heterosexual Populations. Bentley, Western Australia: Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute WA Centre for Health Promotion Research Centre for Research on Ageing, Curtin University. PDF Download. - Best Practice Guidelines: PDF Download. - Literature Review:  PDF Download. Download Page.

GRAI (2007). Older Gay and Lesbian People: Establishing the needs. Lawly, WA: GLBTI Retirement Association Incorporated (GRAI). PDF Download.

Grant JM, et al. (2010). Outing Age 2010: Public Policy Issues Affecting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Elders. National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute. PDF Download. Download Page.

Grossman AH, D'Augelli AR, Hershberger SL (2000). Social support networks of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults 60 years of age or older. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 55B, P171-P179. PDF Download N/ADownload Page. Full Text N/A.

Grossman AH, D'Augelli AR, O’Connell TS (2001). Being Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and 60 or Older in North America. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 13(4) 23-40. PDF Download N/A

Harrison, Jo (2010). Submission to: National Safety and Quality Framework in Australian Health. PDF Download.

Harrison, Jo (2010). Submission to: Inquiry into Caring for Older Australians. Inquiry into Caring for Older Australians.